Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman vs. The U.S. Records of the U.S. Supreme Court Appellate Case No. 2619 Transcript on Microfilm

Collection Number: 5694 mf

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library


DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

Title:
Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman vs. The U.S. Records of the U.S. Supreme Court Appellate Case No. 2619 Transcript on Microfilm, 1917
Collection Number:
5694 mf
Creator:
Supreme Court of the United States
Quantity:
1 microfilm reel
Forms of Material:
Transcripts, microfilm.
Repository:
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Abstract:
Microfilm copy of the transcript of Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman vs. The U.S. Records of the U.S. Supreme Court Appellate Case No. 2619.
Language:
Collection material in English


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

Emma Goldman (1869-1940)
Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches.
She was born in the Russian Empire, and emigrated to the U.S. in 1885, she lived in New York City, where she joined the burgeoning anarchist movement in 1889. She became a writer and a renowned lecturer on anarchist philosophy, women's rights, and social issues.
Goldman and her lover Alexander Berkman (also an anarchist writer), planned to assissinate industrialist and financier Henry Clay Frick as an act of propaganda of the deed. Frick survived the attempt on his life, Berkman was sentenced to 22 years in prison. Goldman was imprisoned several times in the following years for 'inciting to riot'.
In 1917, Goldman and Berkman were sentenced to two years in jail for conspiring to "induce persons not to register" for the newly instated draft. After their release they were arrested with hundreds of others and deported back to Russia.
She supported the Bolshevik revolution at first, but soon after the Kronstadt rebellion, reversed her opinion and denounced the Soviet Union.
She published a book about her experiences, "My Disillusionment in Russia", in 1923. She wrote an autobiography called "Living My Life" while she was living in England, Canada, and France. After the start of the Spanish Civil War, she traveled to Spain to support the anarchist revolution there.
Emma Goldman died in Toronto on May 14, 1940 at age 70.
SUBJECTS

Names:
Berkman, Alexander.
Golman, Emma.
United States. Supreme Court.

Form and Genre Terms:
Transcripts.
Microfilm.


INFORMATION FOR USERS

Access Restrictions:
Access to the collections in the Kheel Center is restricted. Please contact a reference archivist for access to these materials.
Restrictions on Use:
This collection must be used in keeping with the Kheel Center Information Sheet and Procedures for Document Use.
Cite As:
Emma Goldman and Alexander Berkman vs. The U.S. Records of the U.S. Supreme Court Appellate Case No. 2619 Transcript on Microfilm #5694 mf. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.

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CONTAINER LIST

Container
Description
Reel 1 Item 1