ACTWU Motion Picture Films

Collection Number: 5619 F

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library


DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

Title:
ACTWU Motion Picture Films, 1936-1985
Collection Number:
5619 F
Creator:
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers' Union (ACTWU)
Quantity:
28 linear ft.
Forms of Material:
Motion picture films.
Repository:
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Language:
Collection material in English


ACWA/ACTWU ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, the most significant union representing workers in the men's clothing industry, was founded in New York City in 1914 as a breakaway movement from the United Garment Workers. Radical and immigrant workers in the tailors' and cutters' locals were the core of the seceding group, which advocated industrial unionism and economic strikes in opposition to the UGW's craft organization, which they saw as conservative and timid. Their diverging views had come to the fore during the historic 1910 dispute at the Chicago firm Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. The opposition called the strike against the UGW leadership's advice, and reached a path-breaking agreement with management that established an arbitration system to settle disputes.
Members flocked to the new union. Around 50,000 strong at its founding, by 1920 the ACWA counted about 170,000 members. Initially composed mostly of immigrants of Jewish European descent with Socialist leanings, the ACWA quickly welcomed members of a great number of nationalities and diverse backgrounds. Like in other garment unions, most workers and many members were women, but the leadership was predominantly male, a situation that did not change for many decades. Early on the union adopted a centralized administrative structure combined with industrial unionism, with the joint boards' by-laws having precedence over those of locals.
Espousing a philosophy perhaps brought over by its early immigrant socialist members, the Amalgamated went beyond bread and butter issues and adopted a distinctive form of social unionism that was largely absent in the American labor movement. Starting in the 1920s, it provided educational opportunities and recreational facilities for its members, as well as services such as an insurance plan, banks offering personal loans at low interest rates, low-cost housing cooperatives, medical clinics, and even union-owned restaurants.
Sidney Hillman was the first president of the new union and the most important officer in its history. He applied his experience as bargaining representative in Chicago to the whole industry. Under his leadership the union made significant strides in securing better wages and working conditions for its members, and at the same time it consolidated gains and provided stability to the industry through the widespread adoption of the arbitration system tested at Hart, Schaffner, and Marx. Hillman paid close attention to industry issues, such as production, pricing, and marketing. In order to help management meet the competition of non-union firms, the union conducted studies of efficiency, work methods, and factory costs. Letters to the official publication of the union, Advance, document the controversy that ensued within the union over what was perceived to be collaboration with management.
Hillman also understood the importance of labor's involvement in national affairs and political action. In the 1920s the ACWA sent delegates to the Conference for Progressive Political Action and to the Farmer-labor party conventions. Although many members and officers were Socialists, the union stopped short of officially endorsing the party. Communist attempts at gaining influence within the union were firmly curbed. Hillman's participation in national affairs and politics became prominent during the New Deal, when he became a close advisor to Franklin D. Roosevelt on labor and economic issues. He also served on the board of the National Recovery Administration. Later, during World War II, he helped establish the Labor's Non Partisan League. He was also named associate director of the Office of Production Management, which assisted in mobilizing the nation's resources for the war effort. Hillman's prestige perhaps reflected the healthy condition of his union, which by the end of the conflict was strong and stable.
During the post World War II period the union faced a number of significant challenges. Membership continued to grow (peaking at 395,000 in 1968), but the union's political influence and visibility in national affairs declined. In their never ending pursuit of lower production costs, many firms relocated to the South, forcing the union to engage in large organizing efforts. Simultaneously, signs began to appear of changes that would lead to the almost complete demise of the domestic apparel industry and, ultimately, to the erosion of union membership. Foreign imports of cheap clothing goods steadily grew in the 1950s and 1960s, and mushroomed in the following two decades, plunging employment in the apparel sector into a steady decline. Union efforts to stem the tide included Buy American campaigns and extensive lobbying in Congress, but they were to no avail. In 1976, the ACWA merged with the Textile Workers of America to become the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. Despite successful and much publicized nationwide actions such as the Farah boycott and the J.P. Stevens corporate campaign, the woes threatening the union's existence continued unabated. The fate of the domestic industry was sealed in the late 1970s and the 1980s by the flight of firms chasing tax breaks and cheap labor abroad. By 1995, when ACTWU voted to merge with the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union, their combined membership was 350,000. The new Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees (UNITE!) seemed poised to infuse new life in a troubled union.
SUBJECTS

Names:
Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union.
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America.

Form and Genre Terms:
Motion pictures (visual works).


INFORMATION FOR USERS

Access Restrictions:
Access to the collections in the Kheel Center is restricted. Please contact a reference archivist for access to these materials.
Restrictions on Use:
This collection must be used in keeping with the Kheel Center Information Sheet and Procedures for Document Use.
Cite As:
ACTWU Motion Picture Films #5619 F. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.

RELATED MATERIALS

Related Collections:
5619: ACWA Records
5619 AV: ACTWU Audio-Visual Materials

CONTAINER LIST

Container
Description
Date
Box 1 1956
[74] -- Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America; 1956 ; 16mm; good - Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English --Adlai Stevenson Presidential Campaign, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), 1956 Presidential campaign, political action. The film is a speech by Adlai Stevenson, Democratic Candidate for President in 1956. The speech is given at a rally in New York City held by the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. It is an energizing speech where he claims that the US must be the "moral leader of free people everywhere." Adlai Stevenson Democratic Presidential Candidate in 1956, Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, 15 min. long. Film # 38., two prints; second print is in good condition -- 775 feet of film
Box 2
Box 3 1950
[73] -- United States Army ; 1950; 16mm; good condition; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Community involvement, Community service; community action through unions; Chester, PA This is a documentary narrated by Ed Orsel, a worker at the locomotive plant in Chester, PA. The narrator tells the story of how he became involved in community organizing and public service through the involvement in his union and its members. Orsel becomes a community activist in many respects and assumes the responsibility of helping others in need. The main crisis in the film is when a boy gets hit by a car while crossing the street. Orsel and other union members start a public safety campaign and petition the citizens to sign up. They presented this petition and a proposal for more street signs, stop lights, police and crossing guards, to the city council. The proposal passes and the streets are made safer. This shows the potential of community organizing and union's responsibility to mobilize its members around giving back to the community. Chester, Pennsylvania; property of Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Film Division. 15 min. long. -- 680 feet of film
Box 4
[75] -- Julian Hoffman ; Thomas Brando - Public Affairs Film Production; 16mm; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Post WW II strikes; plant shutdowns; layoffs. The film is about the struggles endured by strikers in the mid-late 1940's. The film describes the hardships of striking workers in these years and what kind of opposition and support they faced. It tells about plant shutdowns and employee layoffs as well as local stores and businesses that supported union labor. The end of the film stresses that union members must stay strong and recognize the need to organize so union's power increases. For the Record, 18 min. long. -- 800 feet of film
Box 5 1937
[44] - "Spanish Version"; American Federation of Hosiery Workers, Hosiery Styles for 1937; Education Department of American Federation of Hosiery Workers ; 16 mm ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Hosiery Sit Down Strikes of 1937, Philadelphia Hosiery Workers This is a silent film about the Hosier Workers of Philadelphia in 1937. They joined together and staged massive Sit Down strikes throughout the city of Philadelphia. The film shows how union members joined together in surviving the strike by cooking meals for each other and supporting one another. The employers started negotiating after a while, and soon the unions won. The sit down strikes of 1937 were successful union activities. Sit Down, American Federation of Hosiery Workers; 16 min. long --- 600 feet of film
Box 6 1950
[73] - United States Army 1950; 16mm ; good condition; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Community involvement, Community service; community action through unions; Chester, PA This is a documentary narrated by Ed Orsel, a worker at the locomotive plant in Chester, PA. The narrator tells the story of how he became involved in community organizing and public service through the involvement in his union and its members. Orsel becomes a community activist in many respects and assumes the responsibility of helping others in need. The main crisis in the film is when a boy gets hit by a car while crossing the street. Orsel and other union members start a public safety campaign and petition the citizens to sign up. They presented this petition and a proposal for more street signs, stop lights, police and crossing guards, to the city council. The proposal passes and the streets are made safer. This shows the potential of community organizing and union's responsibility to mobilize its members around giving back to the community. Chester, Pennsylvania; property of Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Film Division. 15 min. long. -- 700 feet of film
Box 7
[76] - American Labor Films; 16mm ; good, yet missing opening frames; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Hopelessness and unemployment, working class power; organizing. The film is the story of a homeless, unemployed gentleman who has trouble finding work in a society that is geared for the wealthy and middle class. He finds work at a plant that is on strike and is stopped at the door by the striking workers for being a "scab". One of the workers explains the cause of the strike and need for working people, like himself, to rise up and show their power against management. He stresses the need to organize and not be divided. The main character then understands the cause and walked the strike line with the workers. Title frames not present, no lead, 20 min. long. -- 650 feet of film
Box 8
[72] - AFL ; 16mm ; good (both prints); Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; California corporate farmworkers, farmworkers strike and DiGiorgio Corporation; Taft-Hartley Act; illegal immigrants. The film is the story of California Farmworkers who are denied decent wages and living conditions under employment with the DiGiorgio Corporation. The workers are forced to work long shifts under bad conditions and without federally mandated or company benefits of any kind. The workers decide to organize under the AFL and strike the employer. In response, DiGiorgio brings in "wetbacks", or illegal immigrants from Mexico to replace those workers on strike. The strike is plagued with violence and unrest. The film also makes the point that the Taft-Hartley Act of 1947 does nothing to help farmworkers and purposely keeps them out of NLRA jurisdiction. Poverty in the Valley of Plenty, 22 min. long. -- 800 feet of film
Box 9 1958
[71] - Nicholas Read; Washington Video Production ; c. 1957-58; 16mm ; good condition ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive ; English; Strike of O'Sullivan Rubber Corporation Strike at Winchester, Virginia by Local 511 of the United Rubber Workers in 1956 and 1957, decertification The film tells the story of the United Rubber Workers Local 511 and their strike of the O'Sullivan Rubber Corporation in Winchester, Virginia. There were three major battles fought in Winchester in both the Revolutionary and Civil Wars and this film tells the story of the "Fourth Battle". After being on strike for 17 months, the strikebreakers voted to de-certify Local 511 and strand the striking workers on the picket lines without a job or a union. The film is a good documentary of the costs and work that go into a strike and the vulnerability of strikers to both their employer, and other workers who disagree with the cause. The Fourth Battle, United Rubber Workers of America. 16 min. long. -- 700 feet of film
Box 10
[57] - 1940s; 16 mm ; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive ; English; Vermont state CIO marching in a parade with High School graduates. "Bizarre footage from the 1940's" -- 600 feet of film
Box 11
[85] - Morton Parker; National Film Board of Canada - Guy Grover; 16 mm ; good ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Shop Steward training, Canada, Steelworkers. This film is the story about a worker in a Canadian steelworker plant. The worker is elected to be shop steward and quickly learns the responsibilities of the job. The film shows how the shop steward got someone's job back after they were fired for unjust reasons. The film stresses the importance of a good shop steward and the work that goes into being one. The Shop Steward, Kodak Safety Film, 22 min. long. -- 1000 feet of film
Box 12
[60] - Nor wood Studios, Washington D.C. 16 mm; good; Black and White; On Reel ; Positive; English; Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union; textiles; health and safety. This film is about the industry that has developed around synthetic fiber as opposed to natural fibers such as cotton, wool and silk. The film talks about the process of creating synthetic fiber from wood and the hazards and technology associated with it. The film emphasizes that a well educated union membership along with an "enlightened management" will lead to minimal health and safety accidents. Americans at Work; Kodak Safety Film; 13 min. long. -- 600 feet of film
Box 13
[90] - Sheila Page and Susan Zig Ellen Wernick - Coalition of Labor Union Women; 16mm ; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; Coalition of Labor Union Women, Women in the labor movement. This film is about women in the labor movement. It is a series of interviews with labor women ranging from President of a local union to staff organizers who have moved their way off the shop floor and into the union office. It stresses the need to organize unorganized women in the work force. It also stresses the need for women to assume responsibility for their working conditions and help mobilize their co-workers and get involved in politics. The film also speaks about the need to address women's issues through union activity. There is a more detailed description in the shipping container. All in Favor, 17 min. long. --- 600 feet of film
Box 14 1977
[48] - Speech at 1977 AFL-CIO Convention; Al Barked; Maurer, Fleisher, Zon and Anderson, Inc.; 1977; 16 mm ; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; Hubert H. Humphrey, 1977 AFL-CIO Convention, Legislation, This is a speech given by Hubert H. Humphrey in one of his last public appearances. He calls for the labor movement to examine its roots and rekindle the flame of years past. He cites the improvements unions have won in people's lives, i.e. Medicare, pensions, eta He pushes the "Humphrey-Hawkins Bill", which holds government responsible for enacting legislation for the purpose of economic advancement through full employment. He urges the union members to never give up their battle and take the lead as a strengthening economic and social movement to confront the problem of unemployment and push government toward progressive legislation. Hubert H. Humphrey; 20 min. long. Kodak Safety Film; good condition -- 800 feet of film
Box 15
[101] - 1955 ; 16mm; good, both prints; Black and White ; On Reel; Positive; English; Panel Discussion, Textile Workers Union of America, New England Textile Mills, negotiations. The film is a panel discussion by various local leaders of the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA) from the New England Area. They talk about efficiency and the high profits of New England textile mills and their ability to provide a decent living wage to workers. The panel is upset over negotiations at one of the mills where the employer is offering virtually nothing and the employees plan to strike. Textile Workers Panel Discussion, 16 min. long. -- 600 feet of film
Box 16
[65] - Bernard Devlin; James Beveridge; 16 mm ; fair, short lead, a little choppy at the beginning, no title frames; Black and White ; On Reel; Positive; English; Canadian trade unions, organizing. This is a film about a factory in Canada that organized when one of the workers was fired unjustly. It is narrated by the union organizer that was sent in by the Local 100 to organize the workers there who were looking for representation. The film follows the progression of the campaign up until the first contract is agreed upon. Local 100, 31 min. long, Kodak Safety film, no title frames present -- 1000 feet of film
Box 17
[20] -- 400 feet of film
Box 18 1938
[5a] - AQUA 1938; 16 mm ; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Atlantic City, New Jersey, Sidney Hillman. This is a series of reels from the ACWA Convention (1938). 1) (film 5A) This film opens with the beginning of the convention. Delegates are seen strolling along the boardwalk and getting to know one another. The second half of this film shows delegates frolicking in a park, possibly rehearsing skits.
Box 19 1941
[10] -- 275 feet of film
Box 20
[8] -- 350 feet of film
Box 21
-- 300 feet of film
Box 22 1937
[14] -- 350 feet of film
Box 23
[11] -- 450 feet of film
Box 24
[187] -- Chambersburg, Pa. Family picnic 7" reel -- 400 feet of film
Box 25
[36] - AQUA; 16 mm ; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English ; Harry Truman accepts the Sidney Hillman Award This film is made by the ACWA and shows the acceptance speech made by Harry Truman upon receiving the 5th Annual Sidney Hillman Award for public service and social welfare. Truman speaks about the need to have new ideas to fix things in our country, we have to be innovative and aim higher. He said we should all do this in the spirit of Sidney Hillman and his efforts to "promote the general welfare" To Promote the General Welfare, 12 min. long. Safety film -- 150 feet of film
Box 26
[25] -- 2 feet of film
Box 27
[39] -- 275 feet of film
Box 28
[17] -- 300 feet of film
Box 29
[35] -- 350 feet of film
Box 30
[26] -- 325 feet of film
Box 31 1948
[6] - 200 feet of film
Box 32
[28] -- 350 feet of film
Box 33 1950
[73] - United States Army, 1950; 16mm; good condition ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Community involvement, Community service; community action through unions; Chester, PA This is a documentary narrated by Ed Orsel, a worker at the locomotive plant in Chester, PA. The narrator tells the story of how he became involved in community organizing and public service through the involvement in his union and its members. Orsel becomes a community activist in many respects and assumes the responsibility of helping others in need. The main crisis in the film is when a boy gets hit by a car while crossing the street. Orsel and other union members start a public safety campaign and petition the citizens to sign up. They presented this petition and a proposal for more street signs, stop lights, police and crossing guards, to the city council. The proposal passes and the streets are made safer. This shows the potential of community organizing and union's responsibility to mobilize its members around giving back to the community. Chester, Pennsylvania; property of Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Film Division. 15 min. long. -- 325 feet of film
Box 34
Track for Roll #3-N/A ; Track for Roll #4-N/A ; TRK ; SYNC -- roll #4-225 feet of film ; roll #3-75 feet of film
Box 35
[1a,b,d] - 1936; 16 mm ; good, all 4 reels; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; 1936 ACWA Convention in Cleveland, OH; Parade; speech; Sidney Hillman; Joseph Scholssberg; Franklin Roosevelt; Canada. This film is a compilation of silent footage from the 1936 convention. The film uses subtitles provided between frames Film 1A: This is the opening of the convention. The films shows delegates on the train arriving in Cleveland and a parade welcoming the members to the convention. The opening session is seen and presided over by General President Sidney Hillman. Hillman introduces General Secretary-Treasurer Joseph Schlossberg. Film 1B: It shows various key union speakers telling their stories and extending their praises to the members of the ACWA including Franklin Roosevelt. The film also shows members voting on various resolutions that were brought up during the convention. Film 1C: This reel begins with the ACWA's Canadian Delegation and their involvement in the convention, also the CIO Chairman speaks and thanks the ACWA for their help in a recent strike. Speakers here discuss the need for new legislation to be passed and a push for union political action. Film 1D: This reel is comprised of the different union committees giving their reports on the status of the union and the goals for that year. The film also covers the Grand Ball which is held before the last day of the convention. The final session includes President Hillman and Vice President Schlossberg being reelected to their positions as well as selecting Atlantic City as the site for their next convention. The film ends with the words: "Glory, Glory, Amalgamated". 1936 ACWA Convention, safety film, subtitles between frames, Films # 1A, (11 min. long. ) 1B (2 copies) (12 min. long. ), 1C (10 min. long) and 1D (11 min. long), Box 4 Union Label Out-takes 1950; 16 mm ; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Out-takes, footage of clothing workers This is a series of outs from the film "Union Label". It is a short compilation of cuts showing employees in the clothing industry doing their job tasks. Union Label -Outs, 5 min. long. Footage edited out of the film "Union Label" -- 400 feet of film (x2)
Box 36 1940
[16] - inside says TWUA 1938 Picnic -- 110 feet of film
Box 37 1946
[3] - Public Affairs Films Inc. 1946; 16 mm ; good ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive ; English; Death of Sidney Hillman, founder of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America, This is a short film documenting the death of Sidney Hillman. It discusses the funeral and mourning ceremonies for this popular labor leader. It also discusses a bit about his life and times. It is a tribute film put out by the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America to their founder and President. We Mourn our Loss, 10 min. long. Safety film -- 300 feet of film
Box 38
[17] -- 150 feet of film
Box 39
[108] - 350 feet of film
Box 40
[19] - 16 mm ; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; ILGWU Strike at Tex-son Clothing Company, San Antonio, Texas; Union Label. This film is a short film by the ILGWU informing viewers about the strike at the Tex-son Company in San Antonio, Texas by ILGWU members. The film talks about why the workers are on strike, the strikebreakers, and urges the audience to buy only clothing with the ILGWU label on it. Mother is on Strike, 5 min. long. Safety film -- 225 feet fof film
Box 41
[18] - CIO Dept. of Education and Research; 16 mm; good (both prints); Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; CIO efforts to repeal Taft-Hartley This film is comprised of a series of still pictures and drawings. It is a film put out by the CIO in an effort to gain support for its campaign to repeal the Taft-Hartley Act. The film urges the audience to vote democratic and write to their representatives to let them know how they feel about Taft-Hartley. It also asks that support be given to the Lesinki Bill, which would reverse Taft-Hartley's negative affects on unions. How To Bury the Taft-Hartley Act, 11 min. long -- 400 feet film
Box 42
[40] - 225 feet of film
Box 43 1939
[22] - January 14, 1939, Netherland Plaza -- 250 feet of film
Box 44
[27] -- 300 feet of film
Box 45
[33] -- 400 feet of film
Box 46
[23] - 1976 ; 16 mm; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; Strike, ACTWU, New York, 1976, factory. This film is a series of clips from a strike in New York City in 1976. The film shows the strikers walking the line outside the factory as well as shots from inside the sweatshop, where no work is being done. ACTWU on Strike in New York City, 10 min. long, safety film, Film 23, Box 5 ACWA Chicago Joint Board Office ACWA; 16 mm; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; ACWA Chicago This film is a silent projection of scenes from inside the office of the ACWA Chicago Joint Board. There are also clips from inside various offices in the building including the Secretary-Treasurer of the Board and other officials. ACWA Chicago Joint Board Office, 10 min. long, safety film -- 325 feet of film
Box 47
[24] - ACWA 1970's; 16 mm ; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; ACWA, boycott , Macy's, New York City, Farah, picketing, leafletting. This film is comprised of footage taken at a boycott picket of Farah Clothing Products in front of Macy's New York. The films shows members of the ACWA walking the picket line, holding signs, and leafletting pedestrians. ACWA Boycott Picket in New York City, 12 min. long. Safety film -- 375 feet of film
Box 48
[13] - 16 mm; good; Black and White; On Reel ; Positive; English ; Keynee Company strike; Cleveland, Ohio, pickets This is a short silent film that shows the strike at the Keynee Company in Cleveland, OH. Most of the scenes are of strikers walking the line and cheering. No other information is given on the film. Keynee Company Strike, 8 min. film -- 250 feet of film
Box 49
[15] - 16 mm; good; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Clothing Workers, parade This is a film that shows the events of Shirtmaker's Day including learning sessions, a dinner reception, and a parade to celebrate the event. Shirtmaker's Day, 12 min. long. -- 400 feet of film
Box 50
[7] -- 250 feet of film
Box 51
[88] - Harold Mayer Production; 16 mm ; good (both prints); Color; On Reel; Positive; English; ACWA, Phillips Van-Heusen Boycott; plant closing. This is a short promotional film put out by the ACWA to encourage consumers to boycott the Phillips Van-Heusen Clothing Company. The company closed numerous plants in Pennsylvania, Alabama, and Arkansas, before moving the operations to Asia. The motivation behind these closings is assumed to be labor costs associated with both union and non-union workforces in the United States. The film urges consumers not to purchase the products made by Phillips Van-Heusen. It's Been Good to Know You, 13 min. long, safety film -- 350 feet of film
Box 52 1976
moved to 5619F from 5619 AV box 6 -- 500 feet of film
Box 53 1975
[87] - TWUA 1975, revised 1987; 16 mm ; very poor, sprocket holes are damaged or missing early in the film ; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; Contracts, Oneita Knitting Mill, strikes, Textile Workers *film is damaged and not viewable; summary taken from "Films and Video Tapes for Labor" Film Division, AFL-CIO Department of Education, Revised March 1987.* Bayard Rustin narrates this story of the long struggle of Oneita Knitting Mill workers who fought for a contract 14 months after they won a representation election at the South Carolina textile plant. Workers tell what the union means to them in terms of human dignity, job security, wages and fringe benefits and what they learned when black and white workers joined together to fight for a union. Contract, Contract; film is damaged and in poor condition, sprocket holes are missing, film does not project properly -- 1000 feet of film
Box 54
[51] -- 1000 feet of film
Box 55
[54] -- 1200 feet of film
Box 56
450 feet of film
Box 57
[42] -- 850 feet of film
Box 58
[106] -- 1100 feet of film on 2 reels
Box 59
F13 - moved from 5619 AV, box 7 -- approx. 1200 feet of film
Box 60
F11 - moved from 5619 AV, box 7 -- 1000 feet of film
Box 61
F61 - moved from 5619 AV, box 7 -- 1000 feet of film
Box 62
moved from 5619 AV, box 25 -- 900 feet of film
Box 63
[101] - 1955; 16mm ; good, both prints; Black and White; On Reel; Positive ; English ; Panel Discussion, Textile Workers Union of America, New England Textile Mills, negotiations. The film is a panel discussion by various local leaders of the Textile Workers Union of America (TWUA) from the New England Area. They talk about efficiency and the high profits of New England textile mills and their ability to provide a decent living wage to workers. The panel is upset over negotiations at one of the mills where the employer is offering virtually nothing and the employees plan to strike. Textile Workers Panel Discussion, 16 min. long -- 600 feet of film
Box 64 1954
700 feet of film
Box 65
[91] - Pt. 1 of 2 - Morton Parker Arthur Mokier Productions; 16 mm ; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; Grievance procedure, seniority rights and promotions, arbitration, IUE. This film tells the story of Technical Engineer, Michael Blais. Blais was passed over for a promotion he felt he should have received. Blais has performed well on the job for 19 years while an employee who has only been there 2 months was promoted (Barbara Parsons). Blais, along with his shop steward (IUE), file a grievance and proceed from there. The film follows the course of the grievance through the first 3 steps and then on to arbitration. It shows the different union and management people who handle each step and what role they play. During arbitrations, both Blais and Parsons are called to testify. The arbitrator decides in favor of the union citing that no legitimate reasoning was used when promoting Parsons and not Blais. The Case of Barbara Parsons, 52 min. long. Safety Film -- 1000 feet of film
Box 66 1972
F3- moved from 5619 AV, box 5 -- 125 feet of film
Box 67
[24] - moved from 5619 AV, box 5 -- 175 feet of film
Box 68
F5 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 150 feet of film
Box 69 1974
F7 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 400 feet of film
Box 70
moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 300 feet of film
Box 71
F1 - moved from 5619 AV, box 4 -- approx. 125 feet of film - on a core
Box 72
F2 - moved from 5619 AV, box 5 -- 200 feet of film
Box 73
F4 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 350 feet of film
Box 74
F8 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 350 feet of film
Box 75
F9 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 300 feet of film
Box 76
F10 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 550 feet of film
Box 77
F6 - moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 125 feet of film
Box 78
moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 574 feet of film
Box 79
F14 - moved from 5619 AV, box 10 -- 1000 feet of film
Box 80
moved from 5619 AV, box 25 -- 900 feet of film
Box 81
[95] - Release Print -- 1000 feet of film - 2 reels
Box 82
9 reels - removed from box 18 during reorganization of this collection --- 1300 feet of film (collectively) on cores
Box 83 1985
(text continued from title) - Press Conference #5 ; Rally for Justice (ACTWU) (#6) // ACTWU - 06708 - Trims -- June 1985 -- 6 Reels -- removed from box 18 during reorganization of this collection -- 1360 feet of film (collectively)
Box 84
3 reels -- removed from box 18 during reorganization of this collection -- 1180 feet of film (collectively)
Box 85
4 reels -- removed from box 14 during reorganization of this collection -- 1625 feet of film (collectively) on cores -- one reel is unlabeled
Box 86
10 reels -- removed from box 13 during reorganization of this collection -- 705 feet of film (collectively) on cores
Box 87
Col. Pos. Print - I/W & W/P -- 4 reels -- removed from box 14 during reorganization of this collection -- 1300 feet of film (collectively)
Box 88
5 reels -- removed from box 14 during the reorganization of this collection -- 1910 feet of film (collectively)
Box 89
4 reels - - 1315 feet of film, 3 on cores, 1 film strip ; removed from box 14 during the reorganization of this collection
Box 90
Removed from box 8 during the reorganization of this collection -- aprox. 600 feet of film on 2 cores
Box 91
8 reels -- removed from box 14 during reorganization of this collection -- 975 feet of film on cores -- untitled reels #116, 117, 118
Box 92
13 Reels -- approx. 500 feet of film on 3 cores
Box 93
Removed from box 8 during reorganization of this collection -- approx. 350 feet of film on a core
Box 94
1 reel -- Roll #13 - N/A ; Golf, Parades, Building -- FF/0000-1190 -- Removed from box 11 during the reorganization of this collection -- 490 feet of film
Box 95
Track and Film ; 4 reels -- Removed from box 4 during the reorganization of this collection -- 1320 feet of film on cores
Box 96
N/A - Rolls #1 and #2 -- approx. 550 feet of film
Box 97
Rolls #5 and #6 -- MOS/Color --- 650 feet of film
Box 98
MOS/Color/NP #13 -- 650 feet of film
Box 99
Reel #1 -- 400 feet of film
Box 100
"Not Used", Archival -- removed from 5619 F, box 18 -- approx. 600 feet of film
Box 101
Reel 9 -- approx. 825 feet of film on a core
Box 102
Rolls #13 and #14 -- MOS ; Color -- moved from 5619 F, box 5 -- approx. 550 feet of film on a core
Box 103
Reel 5 -- moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 300 feet of film on a core
Box 104
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- box 1 - approx. 750 feet of film on 5 cores
Box 105
W/P ; Color ; Reel 3 ; moved from 5619 F, box 18 -- approx. 375 feet of film on 4 cores
Box 106
B S/+ ; Reel 10 ; moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- 650 feet of film
Box 107
[2 of 2] --Roll 1 and 3 ; Reel 16 ; W/P ; Color ; moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- aprox. 500 feet of film on a core
Box 108
Original film - Reel #2, Roll #1 ; W/P ; Track ; moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- approx. 400 feet of film on a core -- TKG: ACTWU - 06708-
Box 109
Finn/Mix ; 16 Mag Safety Reel -- 1000 feet of film
Box 110
Roll C-HH/0005-0984 ; Berkshire Strike // Roll D-AB/00074166 ; Strikes Demo, 1979 -- moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 490 feet of film on a core -- TKG: ACTWU -06708 - Demonstration
Box 111
Roll 7A ; Roll 7 is on Roll 9 ; Roll 8 and 10 ; GJ/0369-0818 - L. Grey's original ; B/W -- 575 feet of film
Box 112
moved from 5619 F, box 13 -- approx. 275 feet of film on a core
Box 113
Reel #2 -- MOX ; Color ; W/P -- approx. 1200 feet of film on cores
Box 114
Roll 16 - Cutting, Stitching, Millwork -- TKG: ACTWU-06708 - Inheritance -- MOS ; Color ; W/P -- 225 feet of film
Box 115
R-1A ; 1B ; 2A ; 2B -- approx. 450 feet of film on a core
Box 116
R-3A -- moved from 5619 F, Box 14 -- approx. 450 feet of film on a core
Box 117
#71 -- moved from 5619 F, box 14 -- 800 feet of film
Box 118
Reel 7 ; moved from 5619 F, box 14 -- approx. 350 feet of film on a core
Box 119
approx. 650 feet of film on 3 cores
Box 120
Reel 8 --Sewing, Cutting, Pressing, Dyeing, Millwork, Pres. Nixon, Shoe making, Fireworks, ACTWU Logo, Close-Ups -- moved from 5619 F, box 18 -- approx. 650 feet of film on a core
Box 121
ACTWU -- B/W -- Reel 4 -- approx. 275 feet of film
Box 122
Cut W/P+ ; (2/28/1985) ; moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- 650 feet of film
Box 123
moved from 5619 F, box 18 -- 450 feet of film
Box 124
Rolls 17 and 18 -- TKG: ACTWU-06708--Inheritance -- MOS ; Color ; W/P -- #18-Shoes, Sewing Shoes -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- 400 feet of film
Box 125
Roll 5 ; B/W -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- 275 feet of film on a core -- 2 rolls, one is unlabeled, may be roll 6 that is referenced on notes in box with rolls
Box 126
Roll 4 ; D/N ; B/W ; N/A -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- approx. 210 feel of film on a core
Box 127
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- 2 films one on a core and one film stip -- approx. 875 feet of film
Box 128
CR# 101, 102 ; SR# 101 ; WP ; Track ; EE000-0696 -- moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 625 feet of film on a core
Box 129
A and B original cut outs -- 2/28/1986 -- moved from 5619 F, box 15 -- 375 feet of film
Box 130
Roll 3 - Ext, NYC -- moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 400 feet of film
Box 131
MOS ; Color : W/P ; Roll #8- -- moved from 5619 F, box 13 -- approx 275 feet of film on a core
Box 132
Music Demo - moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 650 feet of film on a core
Box 133
Roll "E" - JJ/0001-0595 ; Baseball, Voter Lines ; B/W ; W/P - moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- approx. 750 feet of film on two cores
Box 134
moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- box 1-750 feet of film
Box 135
B/W ; Scenic ; Immigrants -- moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 325 feet of film on two cores
Box 136
B/W ; W/P -- moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 800 feet of film on a core
Box 137
moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 190 feet of film on a core
Box 138
W/P ; Track ; Outs ; Original Film -- moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- 1200 feet of film on a core
Box 139
Reel 3 -- moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- 300 feet of film
Box 140
A/P ; W/Mix ; moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 141
I/N -- Reel 8 -- moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- 875 feet of film on a core
Box 142
Reel 2 -- moved from 5619 F, box 15 -- approx. 1000 feet of film on a core
Box 143
Color ; Original ; moved from 5619 F, box 15 -- 375 feet of film
Box 144
moved from 5619 F, box 15 -- 1000 feet of film
Box 145
loose film, no way to measure, in pieces
Box 146
Reel 4 -- approx. 400 feet of film on a core
Box 147
Film, Tracks, CTU, Ftg -- approx. 600 feet of film on 5 cores
Box 148
approx. 200 feet of film
Box 149
WLHFP , Archive -- R-149-156, 158-164 ; Reel 5 ; moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- approx. 600 feet of film on 4 cores
Box 150
Roll #15 -- W/P ; Color ; moved from 5619 F, box 16 --approx. 450 feet of film on a core
Box 151
moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 250 feet of film
Box 152
moved from 5619 AV, box 6 -- 100 feet of film
Box 153
Box 154
Box 155
Box 156 1938
5B -- Reel #2 - no other information available
Box 157 1938
2) (film 5C) . This film shows union officers posing for pictures outside the convention. It also shows Sidney Hillman in discussion groups. The film then cuts to a baseball game where delegates are the spectators. The end of the film shows ballots being cast in an election. Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America - 1938 Convention -- 325 feet of film
Box 158
multiple small rolls of film, hard to determine exact amount, some on cores, some not.
Box 159
400 feet of film
Box 160
[41] -- 400 feet of film
Box 161 1936
Reel #2 [1a,b,d] - 1936; 16 mm ; good, all 4 reels; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; 1936 ACWA Convention in Cleveland, OH; Parade; speech; Sidney Hillman; Joseph Scholssberg; Franklin Roosevelt; Canada. This film is a compilation of silent footage from the 1936 convention. The film uses subtitles provided between frames Film 1B: It shows various key union speakers telling their stories and extending their praises to the members of the ACWA including Franklin Roosevelt. The film also shows members voting on various resolutions that were brought up during the convention. 1B (12 min. long. ) 400 feet of film
Box 162 1936
reel #3 -- [1a,b,d] - 1936; 16 mm ; good, all 4 reels; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; 1936 ACWA Convention in Cleveland, OH; Parade; speech; Sidney Hillman; Joseph Scholssberg; Franklin Roosevelt; Canada. This film is a compilation of silent footage from the 1936 convention. The film uses subtitles provided between frames Film 1C: This reel begins with the ACWA's Canadian Delegation and their involvement in the convention, also the CIO Chairman speaks and thanks the ACWA for their help in a recent strike. Speakers here discuss the need for new legislation to be passed and a push for union political action. 1C (10 min. long) -- 400 feet of film
Box 163 1936
reel #4 -- [1a,b,d] - 1936; 16 mm ; good, all 4 reels; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; 1936 ACWA Convention in Cleveland, OH; Parade; speech; Sidney Hillman; Joseph Scholssberg; Franklin Roosevelt; Canada. This film is a compilation of silent footage from the 1936 convention. The film uses subtitles provided between frames Film 1D: This reel is comprised of the different union committees giving their reports on the status of the union and the goals for that year. The film also covers the Grand Ball which is held before the last day of the convention. The final session includes President Hillman and Vice President Schlossberg being reelected to their positions as well as selecting Atlantic City as the site for their next convention. 1D (11 min. long), -- 400 feet of film
Box 164 1936
reel #4 -- [1a,b,d] - 1936; 16 mm ; good, all 4 reels; Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; 1936 ACWA Convention in Cleveland, OH; Parade; speech; Sidney Hillman; Joseph Scholssberg; Franklin Roosevelt; Canada. This film is a compilation of silent footage from the 1936 convention. The film uses subtitles provided between frames Film 1D: This reel is comprised of the different union committees giving their reports on the status of the union and the goals for that year. The film also covers the Grand Ball which is held before the last day of the convention. The final session includes President Hillman and Vice President Schlossberg being reelected to their positions as well as selecting Atlantic City as the site for their next convention. 1D (11 min. long), -- 400 feet of film
Box 165
400 feet of film
Box 166
400 feet of film
Box 167
[18] - CIO Dept. of Education and Research; 16 mm; good (both prints); Black and White; On Reel; Positive; English; CIO efforts to repeal Taft-Hartley This film is comprised of a series of still pictures and drawings. It is a film put out by the CIO in an effort to gain support for its campaign to repeal the Taft-Hartley Act. The film urges the audience to vote democratic and write to their representatives to let them know how they feel about Taft-Hartley. It also asks that support be given to the Lesinki Bill, which would reverse Taft-Hartley's negative affects on unions. How To Bury the Taft-Hartley Act, 11 min. long -- 400 feet film
Box 168
[51] -- 1000 feet of film
Box 169
[88] - Harold Mayer Production; 16 mm ; good (both prints); Color; On Reel; Positive; English; ACWA, Phillips Van- Heusen Boycott; plant closing. This is a short promotional film put out by the ACWA to encourage consumers to boycott the Phillips Van-Heusen Clothing Company. The company closed numerous plants in Pennsylvania, Alabama, and Arkansas, before moving the operations to Asia. The motivation behind these closings is assumed to be labor costs associated with both union and non-union workforces in the United States. The film urges consumers not to purchase the products made by Phillips Van-Heusen. It's Been Good to Know You, 13 min. long, safety film -- 350 feet of film
Box 170
[95] - Release Print -- 1000 feet of film - 2 reels
Box 171
[F14] - - moved from 5619 AV, box 10 -- 1000 feet of film
Box 172
[91] - Pt. 2 of 2 -- Morton Parker Arthur Mokier Productions; 16 mm ; good; Color; On Reel; Positive; English; Grievance procedure, seniority rights and promotions, arbitration, IUE. This film tells the story of Technical Engineer, Michael Blais. Blais was passed over for a promotion he felt he should have received. Blais has performed well on the job for 19 years while an employee who has only been there 2 months was promoted (Barbara Parsons). Blais, along with his shop steward (IUE), file a grievance and proceed from there. The film follows the course of the grievance through the first 3 steps and then on to arbitration. It shows the different union and management people who handle each step and what role they play. During arbitrations, both Blais and Parsons are called to testify. The arbitrator decides in favor of the union citing that no legitimate reasoning was used when promoting Parsons and not Blais. The Case of Barbara Parsons, 52 min. long. Safety Film -- 1000 feet of film
Box 173
[4 rolls on cores] -- approx. 660 feet of film -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- one roll is only labeled #14A
Box 174
moved from 5619 F box 8 during reorganization -- approx. 350 feet of film on a core
Box 175
moved from 5619 F box 8 during reorganization - approx. 900 feet of film on a core
Box 176
removed from 5619 F box 8 during reorganization - approx. 750 feet of film on a core
Box 177
8 reels - approx. 850 feet of film on 7 cores and one film strip roll
Box 178
[F13] -- approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 179
approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 180
approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 181
approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 182
approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 183
approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 184
approx. 900 feet of film
Box 185
moved from 5619 AV, Box 4 -- approx. 500 feet of film
Box 186
moved from 5619 AV, box 4 -- approx. 700 feet of film
Box 187
moved from 5619 AV, box 4 -- approx. 700 feet of film
Box 188
removed from 5619 F, box 18 -- 2 cores - 400 and 200 feet of film
Box 189
reel 9 -- approx. 650 feet of film on a core
Box 190
rolls #13 and #14 -- moved from 5619 AV, box 5 -- approx. 600 feet of film on a core
Box 191
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 525 feet of film on 3 cores
Box 192
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 300 feet of film on 2 cores
Box 193
reel 3 -- moved from 5619 F, box 18 -- approx. 300 feet of film on a core
Box 194
reel 6 -- Roll 1 and 3 -- approx. 1000 feet of film on a core
Box 195
roll #1 -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- approx. 325 feet of film on a core --
Box 196 1979
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 375 feet of film on a core -- TKG: ACTWU -06708 - Demonstration
Box 197
moved from 5619 F, box 13 -- approx. 400 feet of film on a core
Box 198 1985
approx. 550 feet of film on 2 cores and then one short filmstrip roll
Box 199
R 3B -- moved from 5619 F, box 14 -- approx. 400 feet of film on a core
Box 200
moved from 5619, box 14 -- approx. 450 feet of film on a core
Box 201
approx. 675 feet of film on 7 core and 2 film strips
Box 202
Black and White stills (drawings) - 1800's ; Black and White Photos - 1900-1960's - Roll #3 -- moved from 5619 F, box 11 -- approx. 610 feet of film on a core
Box 203
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- 2 films, one on a core and one filmstrip -- approx. 800 feet of film
Box 204
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- one film on a core -- approx. 625 feet of film
Box 205
roll #7 -- ACTWU- Current Member - -moved from 5619 F, box 13 -- approx. 590 feet of film on a core
Box 206
moved from 5619 F, box 12 -- approx. 300 feet of film
Box 207
moved from 5619 G, box 15 -- approx. 1000 feet of film
Box 208
moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 975 feet of film
Box 209
moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- approx. 775 feet of film
Box 210
approx. 775 feet of film on two cores
Box 211
approx. 700 feet of film on three cores -- one film labeled 'Original Farmer' and one is labeled 'Master Pos'
Box 212
moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- approx. 800 feet of film on 5 cores
Box 213
moved from 5619 F, box 17 -- approx. 1925 feet of film in total of 6 cores
Box 214
approx. 800 feet of film on 3 cores
Box 215
Film, Tracks, CTU -- approx. 800 feet of film on 5 cores
Box 216
Film, Tracks, CTU -- 910 feet of film on 8 film cores and 1 film strip
Box 217
film #18 -- moved from 5619 F, box 16 -- approx. 250 feet of film on 1 core
Box 218
ACTWU - B/W - Reel 4 -- approx. 350 feet of film
Box 219
Box 220
Box 221
Box 222
Box 223
Box 224
Box 225
Box 226
Box 227
Box 228
Box 229
Box 230
Box 231
Box 232
Box 233
Box 234
Box 235
Box 236
Box 237
Box 238
Box 239
Box 240
Box 241
Box 242
Box 243
Box 244
Box 245
Box 246
Box 247
Box 248
Box 249
Box 250
Box 251
Box 252
Box 253