Paul F. Brissenden Collection of Research Materials for Study of Labor Injunctions in New York State

Collection Number: 5230

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library


DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

Title:
Paul F. Brissenden Collection of Research Materials for Study of Labor Injunctions in New York State,
Collection Number:
5230
Creator:
Brissenden, Paul F.
Quantity:
10 linear ft.
Forms of Material:
Broadsides (notices), case files, manuscripts (documents), scrapbooks .
Repository:
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Abstract:
This project was compiled under the direction of Paul F. Brissenden and financed through the resources of the Columbia University Council for Research in the Social Sciences. Although the project was originally scheduled to be completed in just 18 months, it was approximately eight years before the end was achieved.
Prior to 1928, the initial year of the survey, there had been much controversy over the use and effects of the labor injunction against unions in their continuous struggle for recognition and acceptance. It was felt that since almost no literature on the subject was available, a detailed examination of exactly how injunctions were applied to labor dispute cases was paramount in the interest of formulating intelligent public policy.
The primary source for the materials gathered carne from the records in the offices of the county clerks in all of the more important industrial counties of the state. The researchers hoped to gather from these files (1) the facts out of which the application for injunctive relief arose, (2) the chronology of the action, and (3) the final disposition of the case.
It is difficult to evaluate the total effect of The Labor Injunction Study of public policy. Certainly, the Norris-LaGuardia "Anti-Injunction" Act of 1932 was not the result of the Brissenden Study alone, but rather of many years of labor agitation and Congressional inquiry. The Brissenden Study did, however, provide an illuminating analysis for those legislators who sought to correct a judicial imbalance in the collective bargaining structure.
Language:
Collection material in English


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

Paul F. Brissenden was born in Benzonia, Michigan on September 21, 1885. After completing his preparatory education at the Warren Academy in 1904, he enrolled at the
University of Denver from which he graduated in 1908. He earned his Masters Degree from the University of California in 1912 and finally completed his education at Columbia where the Ph.D. Degree was conferred upon him in 1917. On September 30, 1924, Paul Brissenden was married to Margaret A. Geer. They had three children.
In 1914, Brissenden assumed the responsibilities of the position of special agent for the U.S. Commission on Industrial Relations. During the period 1915-1920, he was employed as a special agent for the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
Professor Brissenden began his academic career as an Assistant Professor of Economics at New York University in 1920. Since 1921, however, he has served as lecturer, associate professor and professor of economics at Columbia University.
He was appointed vice-chairman of the Millinery Stabilization Committee, Inc. (New York City) in 1936 and has held that position since. Also, since 1937, Prof. Brissenden has served as impartial chairman under various collective bargaining agreements.
During World War II, Paul Brissenden served as consultant and member to the Clothing Advisory Committee of the Office of Production Management and War Production Board, as special consultant to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, as mediator, arbitrator and referee for the National War Labor Board, and as vice-chairman and public member of the Regional War Labor Board for the Second Region.
Paul Brissenden also served as the chairman of the board of directors of the International Consumers League (1939-1940) and as a member of the board of directors of the International Rescue and Relief Committee beginning in 1940. As an arbitrator, he faithfully served as a member of the panel of the New York State Board of Mediation, American Arbitration Association and the U.S. Conciliation Service. He was a charter member of the National Academy of Arbitrators.
Professor Brissenden was the author of many works. Among them are: The I. W. W., A Study of American Syndicalism, 1919; Labor Turnover In Industry (with Emil Frankel), 1922; The Great Hawaiian Dock Strike, 1953; :The Labor Injunction In Hawaii, 1956 and, also, numerous reports, monographs and contributions to various economics and labor law journals.
Professor Brissenden died in 1974.
Source: Whos Who In America, 1962-63.

COLLECTION DESCRIPTION

Research project conducted from 1928 to 1936, directed by Paul F. Brissenden, professor of economics, Columbia University, assisted by Cleon O. Swayzee, and funded by the Columbia University Council for Research in the Social Sciences.
By systematically analyzing 1000 New York State court cases from 1898 to 1929 in which injunction relief was sought to settle labor disputes, researchers attempted to derive historical judicial policy on injunction usage (in contexts of industrial, socio-economic and geographical conditions) as well as its effects upon the public and parties involved. A further purpose of the study was to make recommendations for changes in public policy in light of research findings.
Administrative records of this project include grant proposals, financial records re project expenditures, interim progress reports (1929-1935) and a summary report (1937). Also correspondence with participating attorneys and with Edwin Witte (Wisconsin Free Library).
The largest part of the collection consists of six hundred and twenty case files, organized by case name, reproduced from New York State county clerk records and those of participating attorneys. Cases fall into four general categories: 1) employer vs. union; 2) union vs. employer; 3) interunion; 4) non-labor. Case files typically include trial transcripts, appeals, legal documents, notes, clippings, correspondence, and supporting documents such as responses of attorneys to questionnaires on economics, procedure and practice. Examples of acts frequently restrained include picketing, labor violence, boycotts, strikes, use of scabs, refusal to submit to labor dispute settlement by an impartial chairman, layoffs, unfair labor practices, use of individual contracts and yellow dog contracts.
Union background files cover labor unions involved in New York State injunction cases, arranged by major industrial sectors (food, clothing, shoes, and building workers and laundry drivers). Files also include a list of New York State injunction cases by major industrial union, constitutions, bylaws, broadsides, trade union publications, employment contracts, collective agreements, and clippings. There are two manuscript volumes summarizing the cases studied.
General background materials accumulated for the project include manuscripts by Albert Fribourg, International Juridical Association, and manuscript notes, pamphlets and clippings on the following subjects: use of the injunction by federal and state courts, anti-injunction law, yellow dog contracts, collective agreements, and work contracts.
Anti-injunction legislation materials include drafts of bills and correspondence re the Shipstead and Blaine Bills (Anti-Injunction Act, 1932), between Brissenden, Herman Oliphant, Felix Frankfurter, Francis Sayre, William Green, Edwin E. Witte, William D. Mitchell, President Herbert Hoover, and George W. Norris. Correspondence concerns judicial procedure and practice, legislation to define and limit jurisdiction of courts in labor disputes, trial by jury in cases of direct criminal attempts, and equity courts. Also, drafts of legislation in effect in Arizona, Illinois, North Dakota, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Wisconsin; correspondence and memoranda concerned with legislation before the New Jersey Chancery (1935) and New York State Legislature (1917-1935).
Also included are manuscripts of reports derived from the study, including studies dealing with the injunctive process, rules of procedure, and legal disposition of cases, as well as statistical tables summarizing the data gathered by Brissenden.
Also included are scrapbooks of clippings on the New Deal period concerned with the U.S. Public Works Administration, unemployment relief measures for women, artists, youth, white collar workers, strikes by Work Projects Administration employees and cooperative exchange of goods and services.
SUBJECTS

Names:
Brissenden, Paul F. (Paul Frederick), 1885-1974.
Frankfurter, Felix, 1882-1965
Fribourg, Albert
Green, William, 1872-1952
Greene, Nathan
Hoover, Herbert, 1874-1964
Mitchell, William D.
Norris, George W. (George William). 1861-1944
Oliphant, Herman, 1884-1939
Sayre, Francis
Witte, Edwin E. (Edwin Emil), 1887-1960
United States. Public Works Administration.

Subjects:
Boycotts--United States.
Labor injunctions--Arizona.
Labor injunctions--Illinois.
Labor injunctions-- New Jersey.
Labor injunctions--New York (State)
Labor injunctions--North Dakota.
Labor injunctions--Ohio.
Labor injunctions--Oregon.
Labor injunctions--Rhode Island.
Labor injunctions--United States--Statistics.
Labor injunctions--Wisconsin.
New Deal, 1933-1939.
Picketing--United States.
Public service employment--United States.
Strikebreakers--United States.
Strikes and lockouts--United States.
Unfair labor practices--United States.
Yellow dog contract.
Clothing industry. United States. Labor injunctions.
Construction industry. United States. Labor injunctions.
Food industry. United States. Labor injunctions.
Labor injunctions. Shoe industry. United States.
Labor laws and legislation. United States. Criminal provisions.
Labor violence. United States.
Laundry industry. Labor injunctions. United States.
Layoffs. United States.

Geographic Subjects:
United States. Economic policy. 1933-1945.

Form and Genre Terms:
Broadsides (notices)
Case files.
Manuscripts (documents)
Scrapbooks.


INFORMATION FOR USERS

Access Restrictions:
Access to the collections in the Kheel Center is restricted. Please contact a reference archivist for access to these materials.
Restrictions on Use:
This collection must be used in keeping with the Kheel Center Information Sheet and Procedures for Document Use.
Cite As:
Paul F. Brissenden Collection of Research Materials for Study of Labor Injunctions in New York State #5230. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.
SERIES LIST

Series I: The Injuction Inquiry
Sub-Series A: Administration of Project
Sub-Series B: Reports Derived From the Study
Series II: Background Information on the Injuction
Sub-Series A: Articles on Injunctions
Sub-Series C: State Injunction Legislation
Sub-Series D: State Injunction Cases (Other Than New York)
Sub-Series E: Federal Injunction Cases
Sub-Series F: Information on the Work Contract
Series III: Background Information on the Unions Involved in the New York Injunction Cases
Sub-Series A: List of New York Injunction Cases
Sub-Series B: Union Background Information (New York)
Series IV: New York State Injunction Cases
Series V: Collection of Newspaper Clippings During the New Deal Period

CONTAINER LIST

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