U.S. President's Railroad Commission Photographs

Collection Number: 5003 P

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library

This collection was processed with the help of generous funding from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC).
DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

Title:
U.S. President's Railroad Commission Photographs, 1960-1961
Collection Number:
5003 P
Creator:
U.S. President's Railroad Commission;
Anderson, Donald H.;
Anderson, Leo R.;
Bartley, Edward J.;
DuBose, L. A.;
Dunn, Walter R.;
Franklin, Henry H.;
Golden, James L., Jr.;
Guinea, Edgar R.;
Guthrie, Clifton ;
Harp, Autry A.;
Howell, Fred D.;
LaRue, M. H. ;
Mahoney, Barney J.;
Neupert, Raymond A.;
Pippy, Herman D.;
Plock, Henry G.;
Redmond, James B.;
Ritchie, Joseph H.;
Shimel, Walter;
Spencer, Harold;
Stanley, Roy T.;
Stemrich, James;
Strommen, Arnold M.;
Vawter, Howard M. ;
Vick, Simeon G.;
Vickers, Sanford ;
Whitworth, T. A.;
Zumwikle, V. S.
Quantity:
4.5 linear ft.
Forms of Material:
Photographs.
Repository:
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Abstract:
Photographs of railroad workers, yards, trains, buildings, hearings and cardboard exhibit materials.
Language:
Collection material in English


ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY

The U.S. Presidential Railroad Commission was established by Executive Order No. 10891 of November 1, 1960, to consider a controversy between carriers represented by the Eastern, Western, and Southeastern Carriers' Conference Committees and the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers, the Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen, the Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen, the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, and the Switchmen's Union of North America.
Specifically, the controversy surrounded the assertion by the carriers that firemen were not needed on diesel locomotives and that their positions should be eliminated. The unions, on the other hand, maintained that modern diesel locomotives were much too complex to be operated by one engineer and that firemen were necessary to ensure safety. Seventy-nine witnesses appeared before the Commission and statements were filed on behalf of one hundred and fifty-five additional witnesses.
On February 28, 1962, the Commission filed its final report, recommending substantial changes in many of the railroad's work rules. It agreed with the carriers' position that 40,000 firemen helpers who served on freight trains were no longer needed. It also recommended that the railroads "should have an unlimited right to technological change."
See Cornell University Library's catalog entry for the final Report here.

COLLECTION DESCRIPTION

Inclusive date range: 1960-1962
Bulk dates: 1960
This collection consists of 1,656 images (8 film negatives and 1,648 photographs) that were taken on behalf of the railroad labor organizations to support the testimony of their members before the U.S. President's Railroad Commission regarding the crew consist dispute and their assertions regarding the necessity of the fireman position.
The railroad labor unions asked their members who worked for various carriers across the country to document their workplaces, such as train yards, stations and terminals, railroad tracks in urban and rural settings, industry sidings, industrial facilities, and locomotive engines. These photographs document the railroad facilities and equipment of 48 carriers across the United States, and were taken by more than 30 railroad employees, the majority of whom were employed as firemen and engineers.
A number of the photographs were entered into evidence by the unions, but not all of them were used in evidentiary proceedings before the Commission. Both evidentiary photographs and those not used in the proceedings are located in this collection.
The photographs are arranged into 34 Series. The series each contain photographs documenting a specific carrier in a unique location, taken by an employee or employees of that carrier on behalf of their union. Where possible, the photographs have been identifed by their exhibit number as referred to in testimony or, where that is lacking, internal numbering written on the versos of the photographs. Descriptions of the images are taken from the testimony of the photographers. For those photographs that were not included as exhibits, descriptions have been assembled from contemporaneous notes, geographical clues found in the images, and other information found in other exhibits submitted by the Organizations to the Commision.
SUBJECTS

Names:
Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe Railway Company
Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Company
Baltimore and Ohio Chicago Terminal Railroad Company
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Birmingham Southern Railroad Company
Boston and Maine Railroad
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers (U.S.) (BLE)
Brotherhood of Locomotive Firemen and Enginemen (BLFandE)
Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen (BRT)
Central of Georgia Railway
Central Railroad of New Jersey
Chicago and North Western Transportation Company
Chicago Great Western Railway Company (1892-1909)
Chicago River and Indiana Railroad Company
Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad Company
Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul, and Pacific Railroad Company
Chicago, Rock Island, and Pacific Railroad Company (1866-1880)
Colorado and Southern Railway
Delaware and Hudson Railway Company
Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company
Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad Company
Duluth, Missabe, and Iron Range Railway
Erie Railroad Company
Erie-Lackawanna Railroad Company
Express Service
Florida East Coast Railway
Great Northern Railway Company (U.S.)
Illinois Central Railroad Company
Kansas City Terminal Railway
Lehigh Valley Railroad Company
Long Island Rail Road
Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company
Minneapolis, St. Paul and Sault Ste. Marie Railway Company
Missouri Pacific Railroad Company
New York Central Railroad Company
New York, Chicago and St. Louis Railroad
New York, New Haven, and Hartford Railroad Company
Norfolk and Portsmouth Belt Line Railroad Company
Norfolk and Western Railway
Northern Pacific Railroad Company610
Order of Railway Conductors and Brakemen (ORC)
Pacific Coast Railroad Company
Panhandle and Santa Fe Railway Company
President's Railroad Commission (U.S.)
Reading Company
Seaboard Air Line Railway Company. Virginia Division
Southern Pacific Railroad Company
Southern Railway (U.S.)
Spokane, Portland, and Seattle Railway
St. Louis Terminal Railroad Association
St. Louis-San Francisco Railway Company
Switchmen's Union of North America (SUNA)
Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis
Texas & Pacific Railway
Union Pacific Railroad Company
Virginian Railway
Wabash Railroad
Washington Terminal Company
Western Maryland Railway Company
Western Pacific Railroad Company
30th Street Yard -- Alabama -- Birmingham
7th Street Terminal -- California -- San Francisco
Alfalfa Yard -- Texas -- El Paso
Argo Yard -- Washington -- Seattle
Atlanta Terminal Station -- Georgia -- Atlanta
Atlanta Union Station -- Georgia -- Atlanta
Bayshore Yard -- California -- San Francisco
Bayside Yard -- Washington -- Everett
Belle Dock Yard -- Connecticut -- New Haven
Bessemer Yard -- Alabama -- Bessemer
Birmingham Terminal Station-- Alabama -- Birmingham
Boston Terminal Yards -- Massachusetts -- Cambridge
Boyles Yard -- Alabama -- Birmingham
Bridgeport Yards -- Connecticut -- Bridgeport
Brooklyn Yards -- Oregon -- Portland
Burlington Railroad Yard -- Missouri -- St. Joseph
Burnham Yards -- Colorado -- Denver
Butte Street Yard -- California -- Los Angeles
Buttonwood Yards -- New Jersey -- Hanover Township
Cedar Hill Yard -- Connecticut -- New Haven
Chicago and North Western Passenger Terminal -- Illinois -- Chicago
Clarksdale Station -- Missouri -- Clarksdale
Collinwood Yard -- Ohio -- Cleveland
Delaware Avenue-- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Denver Union Station -- Colorado -- Denver
East Bridgeport Yard -- Connecticut -- East Bridgeport
East Thomas Yard -- Alabama -- Birmingham
Elmhurst Depot -- Illinois -- Elmhurst
Enola Yards -- Pennsylvania -- Harrisburg
Ensley Yard-- Alabama -- Birmingham
Everett Passenger Depot -- Washington -- Everett
Fairhill Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
First Street Yard -- Massachusetts -- Boston
Girard Point Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Grand Central Terminal -- New York State -- New York
Gray's Ferry Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Great Northern Depot -- Washington -- Spokane
Guild's Lake Yard -- Oregon -- Portland
Halstead Street Yard -- Illinois -- Chicago
Harlem River Yard -- New York -- New York State
Harrisburg Penn Station -- Pennsylvania -- Harrisburg
Harrisburg Yards -- Pennsylvania -- Harrisburg
Hudson Rail Yards -- New York -- New York State
Inman Yards -- Georgia -- Atlanta
Interbay Yard -- Washington -- Seattle
Ivy City Car Shop -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Kansas City Terminal -- Missouri -- Kansas City
Kansas City Terminal Yards -- Kansas -- Kansas City
Kansas City Union Station -- Missouri -- Kansas City
King Street Station -- Washington -- Seattle
Lambert's Point Yard -- Norfolk, VA
Lincoln Street Terminal -- Illinois -- Chicago
Melrose Park Depot -- Illinois -- Melrose Park
Memphis Terminal Yard -- Tennessee -- Memphis
Midvale Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Minneapolis Junction -- Minnesota -- Minneapolis
Mission Bay Yards -- California -- San Francisco
New Haven Union Station -- Connecticut -- New Haven
Oak Park Depot -- Illinois -- Oak Park
Oakland Yard -- California -- Oakland
Penn Coach Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Pocatello Passenger Depot -- Idaho -- Pocatello
Pocatello Yards -- Idaho -- Pocatello
Portland Union Station -- Oregon -- Portland
Portland Union Station Yard --- Oregon -- Portland
Portlock Yard -- Virginia -- Norfolk
Potomac Yards --Virginia -- Alexandria
Proviso Yards -- Illinois -- Chicago
River Street Yard -- Connecticut -- New Haven
Rutherford Yards -- Pennsylvania -- Harrisburg
Seaboard Yard -- Alabama -- Birmingham
Seattle House Yard -- Washington -- Seattle
Sewell's Point Yard -- Virginia -- Norfolk
Southern Pacific Yards -- California -- Los Angeles
Stamford Passenger and Freight Y-- Texas -- El Paso
Tidewater Yard -- Pennsylvania -- Philadelphia
Topeka Terminal -- Kansas --Topeka
U.S. Army Base -- New York State -- Bay Ridge
Union Station -- Missouri -- St. Louis
Union Stock Yardsds -- Illinois -- Chicago
Union Yard -- Minnesota -- Minneapolis
Uptown Yard -- Texas -- El Paso
Washington DC Union Station -- District of Columbia -- Washington
Water Street Yard -- Connecticut -- New Haven
West Oakland Diesel Shop -- California -- Oakland
Wilkes Barre Yards -- Wilkes Barre, PA

Subjects:
Wood Street Yards Illinois -- Chicago
Bridges
Industries
Mines and mineral resources
Locomotive engineers
Locomotive firemen
Locomotives
Railroad cars
Railroad crossings
Railroad passenger cars
Railroad stations
Railroad stations -- California
Railroad stations -- Alabama
Railroad stations -- Texas
Railroad stations -- Washington
Railroad stations -- Georgia
Railroad stations -- Connecticut
Railroad stations -- Massachusetts
Railroad stations -- Oregon
Railroad stations -- Missouri
Railroad stations -- Colorado
Railroad stations -- New Jersey
Railroad stations -- New York State
Railroad stations -- Illinois
Railroad stations -- Pennsylvania
Railroad stations -- District of Columbia
Railroad stations -- Kansas
Railroad stations -- Virginia
Railroad stations -- Tennessee
Railroad stations -- Minnesota
Railroad stations -- Idaho
Railroad switches
Railroad terminals
Railroad tracks
Railroad yards
Railroads--Buildings and structures
Railroads--Employees
Railroads--Equipment and supplies
Railroads--Freight
Railroads--Maintenance and repair
Railroads--Signaling
Shipping
Steamboats
Tugboats

Form and Genre Terms:
Photographs


INFORMATION FOR USERS

Access Restrictions:
Access to the collections in the Kheel Center is restricted. Please contact a reference archivist for access to these materials.
Restrictions on Use:
This collection must be used in keeping with the Kheel Center Information Sheet and Procedures for Document Use.
Cite As:
U.S. President's Railroad Commission Photographs #5003 P. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.

RELATED MATERIALS

Related Collections:
5003: U.S. President's Railroad Commission Records
5003 MB: U.S. President's Railroad Commission Memorabilia
6040 P: Railroad Collection Photographs
SERIES LIST

Series I: Birmingham Southern Railroad: Industries and Yards
Series II: Boston and Maine Railroad (B&M): Boston Terminal Yards
Series III: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad (B&O): Chicago Division
Series IV: Central Railroad of New Jersey: Buttonwood Yards and Wilkes-Barre Interchange
Series V: Chicago & North Western Railway: Chicago Terminal Division, Proviso Yards
Series VI: Chicago River and Indiana Railroad: Chicago Industries and Union Stock Yards
Series VII: Denver's Burnham Yards: The Rio Grande (DRGW), Colorado & Southern, and Santa Fe Railway (ATSF) facilities
Series VIII: Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway: mining and shipping operations
Series IX: Great Northern Railway: Everett and Seattle, Washington
Series X: Great Northern Railway: Minneapolis Junction
Series XI: Illinois Central Railroad: Memphis Division
Series XII: Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific Railroad: Missouri/Kansas Division, Kansas City Terminal and Yards
Series XIII: Long Island Railroad (LIRR): Car Float operations at Long Island City and Hudson River Railyards
Series XIV: Louisville and Nashville Railroad (L&N): Birmingham Division, yards, passenger terminals, and industries
Series XV: Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad (The Milwaukee Road): locomotives and rolling stock
Series XVI: New York Central Railroad (NYCRR) Cleveland Division Collinwood Yards
Series XVII: Northern Pacific Railroad and Great Northern Railway: facilities in Spokane, Washington
Series XVIII: Norfolk and Western Railroad: Norfolk Terminal and Yards
Series XIX: New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad: Yards and Tracks from New York City to Boston, Massachusetts
Series XX: U.S. President's Railroad Commission
Series XXI: Pennsylvania Railroad: Enola Yards, Rutherford Yards, Harrisburg Penn Station
Series XXII: Pennsylvania Railroad: Philadelphia Division
Series XXIII: Reading Railroad: Rutherford Yards and Steelton Industries
Series XXIV: Southern Railway: Inman Yards and Atlanta Terminal
Series XXV: Southern Pacific Railroad: Los Angeles SoPac Yards
Series XXVI: Southern Pacific Railroad: Western Division, West Oakland Yards
Series XXVII: Southern Pacific Railroad: Pacific Division, El Paso Yards
Series XXVIII: Southern Pacific Railroad: Brooklyn Yards (Portland, Oregon)
Series XXIX: Southern Pacific Railroad: Coast Division, San Francisco
Series XXX: Texas and Pacific Railway: El Paso Yards
Series XXXI: Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis: St. Louis Union Station and surrounding yards
Series XXXII: Union Pacific Railroad: Denver Union Terminal and Freight Houses
Series XXXIII: Union Pacific Railroad: Pocatello, Idaho passenger depot and freight yards
Series XXXIV: Washington Terminal Co. Railroad: Washington D.C. Union Station and Potomac Yards

CONTAINER LIST

Container
Description
Date
This series consists of photographs of the Birmingham Southern Railroad, which were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 36, are referred to by the letter I in testimony, and were taken by James L. Golden, Jr. Mr. Golden worked as a fireman and engineer for Birmingham Southern and was the general chairman of the local BLF&E. The Birmingham Southern Railroad was a subsidiary of the U.S. Steel Corporation. It was a terminal switching and road haul carrier, operating a main line between Birmingham and Bessemer, Alabama. The photographs in this series depict the various industries served by this carrier as well as the train yards in Ensley and Birmingham, Alabama.
Box 54 Folder 2 1960
This yard is located south of the steel mills seen in photo, and north of 34th Street. There are 28 classifications tracks on the west side (to left of photo), and 4 leads from the main line on the east side of the yard. This is a kick yard. The building to the right is the yard office. Crews report for duty at the yard office and cross over to pick up their engines. The yard is also an interchange with Southern, L&N, and SLSF railroads.
Box 54 Folder 2
Box 54 Folder 3 1960
Located just south of U.S. Steel works at Ensley. BS has trackage rights and delivers cars to TC&I Railroad at Pratt Railroad Yard (just south of photo's location). The tracks in the photo run north and south. The TC&I hauls hot metal while the BS hauls coal and ore. Close clearance between tracks requires extra vigilance from engineer and fireman. Note cross walks and road way next to and crossing tracks.
Box 54 Folder 3
Box 54 Folder 4 1960
The tracks run north and south. The five unit diesel is on the inbound main line; to the left of the units is the outbound main line. This is a hump yard; crews work from both ends of the yard. The yard is always congested with yard and road crews from various railroads. Interchanges and deliveries between BS, the SL&SF, the IC, and Central of Georgia Railroads occur in this facility.
Box 54 Folder 4
Box 54 Folder 5 1960
Same movement as in photo I-3; shows progress of train into yard.
Box 54 Folder 5
Box 54 Folder 6 1960
Same movement as in photo I-3; shows progress of train and "S" curve train makes going into the yard.
Box 54 Folder 6
Box 54 Folder 7 1960
Industry is U.S. Pipe Shop.
Box 54 Folder 7
This series consists of photographs of the B&M Railroad's facilities in Boston, Massachusetts. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 21, are referred to by the letter C in testimony, and were taken by Walter P. Dunn. Mr. Dunn was employed as an engineman in the B&M's switching operations in the Boston Terminal Yards. The B&M was a class I railroad operating in northern New England, offering both passenger and freight service. The photographs document the switching operations performed by the B&M in freight yards located in north Boston and Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Box 53 Folder 21 1960
Heavily traveled crossing over which all switching is done. The truck is crossing the tracks even though a train is approaching from the upper yards.
Box 53 Folder 21
Box 54 Folder 8 1960
Yard 7 (North Station) Water Street crossing, looking west. Fireman observes crossing and other safety features. Crossing is inside the switching yard.
Box 54 Folder 8
Box 54 Folder 9 1960
Piggybacking in center-left of frame. Track curvature to left and right. Overhead bridge, no personnel on top of cars allowed. Cannot ride on side of car. Tracks at right of at picture used by workers as exit from A House.
Box 54 Folder 9
Box 54 Folder 10 1960
A House and B House tracks. Yard office in center of photo, behind semi-truck crossing tracks on Water Street.
Box 54 Folder 10
Box 54 Folder 11 1960
A and B House tracks. Engines work headed west. Most tracks have left and right curvature with unprotected crossing on left side of engine. Yard office in center of picture, behind Water Street crossing.
Box 54 Folder 11
Box 54 Folder 12 1960
A House and B House tracks. Yard office in center of photo behind Water Street crossing.
Box 54 Folder 12
Box 54 Folder 13 1960
Yard 7 (North Station) Water Street crossing, looking west. Fireman observes crossing and other safety features. Crossing is inside the switching yard.
Box 54 Folder 13
Box 54 Folder 14 1960
Looking East. Ground crew at west end with cars. Fireman observing crossing and unknown factors in easterly direction. Piggyback trailer on car being moved by B&M Unit #1209
Box 54 Folder 14
Box 54 Folder 15 1960
Curvature to left and right. Note low clearance above and to the side. Platforms and dollies fouling platform on fireman's side.
Box 54 Folder 15
Box 54 Folder 16 1960
Looking East. B&M Unit #1209 no longer has piggyback trailer.
Box 54 Folder 16
Box 54 Folder 17 1960
Looking out into yard from freight house. Unprotected crossing heavily traveled by crews after piggybacks are delivered and dispatched. Clearance makes working on top of or on the sides of cars impossible. All work here performed through motions to man on left side of engine.
Box 54 Folder 17
Box 54 Folder 18 1960
Looking west, back of Yard Office in center of picture.
Box 54 Folder 18
Box 54 Folder 19 1960
Curvature to left, no clearance on top or on sides of cars. Note platforms between cars. Work performed on right side of engine, which depends on the fireman to protect on left side for workmen safety.
Box 54 Folder 19
Box 54 Folder 20 1960
Curvature to left, no clearance on top or on sides of cars. Note platforms between cars. Work performed on right side of engine, which depends on the fireman to protect on left side for workmen safety.
Box 54 Folder 20
Box 54 Folder 21 1960
Looking east. Curvature to left, no clearance on top or on sides of cars. Work performed on right side of engine, which depends on the fireman to protect on left side for workmen safety.
Box 54 Folder 21
Box 54 Folder 22 1960
Looking east. Curvature to left, no clearance on top or on sides of cars. Work performed on right side of engine, which depends on the fireman to protect on left side for workmen safety.
Box 54 Folder 22
Box 54 Folder 23 1960
Eastward curvature, tracks crossover. Gates in front of crossing in "Up" position. Second unprotected crossing in front of yard office.
Box 54 Folder 23
Box 54 Folder 24 1960
Eastward curvature, tracks crossover. Gates in front of Water Street crossing in "Up" position. Second unprotected crossing in front of yard office.
Box 54 Folder 24
Box 54 Folder 25 1960
"C" House tracks. Left and right curvature. No clearance on top of or on sides of cars. Work by ground crews done on both sides of engine. Crossing flagged during daylight hours. No protection at night. Heavy traffic day and night.
Box 54 Folder 25
Box 54 Folder 26 1960
"C" House tracks. Left and right curvature. No clearance on top of or on sides of cars. Work by ground crews done on both sides of engine. Crossing flagged during daylight hours. No protection at night. Heavy traffic day and night.
Box 54 Folder 26
Box 54 Folder 27 1960
"A" House and "B" House tracks. Facing east. Note cars fueling on left side of engine to the right of picture. Riding on top of cars prohibited. Close clearance to left and right side.
Box 54 Folder 27
Box 54 Folder 28 1960
"A" House and "B" House tracks. Facing east. Note cars fueling on left side of engine to the right of picture. Riding on top of cars prohibited. Close clearance to left and right side.
Box 54 Folder 28
Box 54 Folder 29 1960
General view from Tower 5, which controls all power switches in the area. New Hampshire Division main line is on the left, which divides Yard 9 from Yard 8, making an operation on a huge "U" curve necessary, and where a fireman is a vital no matter which direction a move is made due to curves and congestion and short switch circuits where moves may be brought to a halt by Tower 5.
Box 54 Folder 29
Box 54 Folder 30 1960
Lower Yard 9 as seen from Tower 5, a controlling tower for all power operated switches in unsignalled territory
Box 54 Folder 30
Box 54 Folder 31 1960
This photograph shows: curve operations on tracks (from left to right) 21 to 35; switchback ground curving the opposite way in a congested area; partially signaled; entire main line behind tower "C" (with white roof in right background); to enter and cross main lines without air brakes; and with up to 40 cars by B&M rail. Fireman a constant lookout in both directions as above. Carefully note B&M Locomotive #1203 in background (in front of Boston Paper Board C. sign) on which a failure has occurred, and fireman checking engine room on left side to locate same.
Box 54 Folder 31
Box 54 Folder 32 1960
General view showing curvature in the entire yard where the engineer is entirely dependent on signals relayed by fireman. Tracks in foreground (right to left): caboose spur, tracks 1 to 35, with Yard 10 lead on extreme left.
Box 54 Folder 32
Box 54 Folder 33 1960
Photograph showing lower end of Yard 8, end of curvature, and convergence into four connecting tracks to Yard 9. View from engineer's side on all outbound trains and drafts to Portland division, tracks, and other signals.
Box 54 Folder 33
This series consists of photographs of the B&O Railroad's facilities in Chicago, Illinois. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 12, are referred to by the letter G in testimony, and were taken by James B. Redmond. Mr. Redmond was employed as a fireman and engineman in the B&O's Chicago Division, operating both freight and passenger trains from Garrett, Indiana westward to Chicago, Illinois and eastward to Willard, Ohio. The B&O was a class I railroad in the United States, linking Baltimore with the eastern seaboard, port cities on the Great Lakes, and the Midwest with terminals in both St. Louis and Chicago. The photographs in this series document Chicago's Robey Street Yards, Wood Street Yards, the Lincoln Passenger Terminal, and the industries served in the Cicero Switching District.
Box 53 Folder 20 1960
Picture shows a close view of the scrap car, where the debris lays alongside of the car. This constitutes a safety hazard because debris can cause train derailments. Also, the close clearance the of the building means that the signal passing happens on the fireman's side.
Box 53 Folder 20
Box 55 Folder 76 1960
A more precise view of the ready track and the Pullman Yards. (Robey Street is now Damen Avenue).
Box 55 Folder 76
Box 55 Folder 79 1960
Notice tracks 14-18: these tracks wind around to curve to the right and then around to curve to the right and again to the left. The personnel that services the box cars and rolling stock are walking up and down the tracks.
Box 55 Folder 79
Box 56 Folder 60 1960
A general view of the Robey Street Yards looking from the top of a freight car, which is on one of the switching leads into the classification yard. On the far left of the picture is a lead that goes to an industry serviced by the BOCT. The classification yards are in the left center of the photograph, and the Northwestern middle yard tracks are on the right.
Box 56 Folder 60
Box 56 Folder 62 1960
Opposite view from exhibit G-9, from across the street. It shows the gondola scrap car from other side. Notice debris on tracks and close clearance.
Box 56 Folder 62
Box 56 Folder 63 1960
Another view of the industrial switching at Cicero, IL by the BOCT. Switching is done across a public street; notice the car on the right fouling the tracks. Notice how the track continues into the building.
Box 56 Folder 63
Box 56 Folder 65 1960
A closer view of entrance to Cicero Industrial yards, looking at the grade crossing from the east (like G-12). Two streets which are intersected by an industrial track.The industrial track is protected only by a cross-arm sign (in extreme left of photograph). Heavy truck and automobile traffic.
Box 56 Folder 65
Box 56 Folder 67 1960
A picture of one of the Hotpoint Plants that is serviced by the BOCT. The gate to the plant must be opened by plant employees. Notice the "S" curve leading into plant. Fence divides BOCT industry track from CBQ tracks in left of photograph.
Box 56 Folder 67
Box 56 Folder 121 1960
Another view of the industrial switching at Cicero, IL by the BOCT. Switching is done across a public street; notice the car on the right fouling the tracks. Notice how the track continues into the building.
Box 56 Folder 121
Box 56 Folder 122 1960
Looking at the grade crossing from the east. Two streets which are intersected by an industrial track.The industrial track is protected only by a cross-arm sign (in extreme left of photograph). Heavy truck and automobile traffic.
Box 56 Folder 122
Box 56 Folder 124 1960
This industry has gates that are held shut by a barrel that must be removed before switching operations can be made. Note that the automobile is parked adjacent to the tracks. This switching is done on fireman's side because of a tangent curve to the left, so it's up to the fireman to relay signals to the engineer. Also the fireman must keep a look-out for the general public because it is a public thoroughfare.
Box 56 Folder 124
Box 63 Folder 107 1960
Picture is taken from the top of a car located on the Wood Street industrial track. The tracks in the center and in the left of the picture are part of the Chicago Northwestern middle yard; B&O yard crewsalso work in the middle yard when interchanging cars with Chicago Northwestern. The Color Position Light (CPL) signal in the center of the picture is used for main track movements. To the right of the signal is no. 1 and no. 2 main tracks (the two tracks that have ballast under the ties). Then further to right we have the yard tracks 1 through18. The yard tracks are parallel to the main tracks.
Box 63 Folder 107
Box 63 Folder 108 1960
This is a view looking across the yard from the top of a car located on the Wood Street industrial track. Here we see a clear view of the Pullman Yards where the passenger cars pass. Mainline passenger trains are made up here. This yard is located from a straight switching lead to a tangent curve to the right. Yard is also used by Soo Line and C&O railroads.
Box 63 Folder 108
Box 63 Folder 109 1960
This picture is of the general view of the Wood Street and Robey Street (Robey Street is now Damen Avenue) yard area. The first two tracks are for main line movement. The first in the picture is the inbound, the second outbound. The remaining tracks are used for yard switching. Notice the reverse curve in the construction of the yard. This consists from a straight track to a tangent curve to the left and straight track and a tangent left. The tracks to the right of the curve typically are for engine house use for outbound engines, with the exception of the one to the right of the second diesel. That one is used for incoming engines. To the extreme left is the Northwestern middle yards.
Box 63 Folder 109
This series consists of photographs of the Central Railroad Company of New Jersey's and other carriers' facilities in and around Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 49, are referred to by the letter Z in testimony, and were taken by James Stemrich. Mr. Stemrich was a qualified fireman and engineer for the CNJ and worked in yard service. The CNJ was a class I railroad that operated primarily in New Jersey with branches that extended into Pennsylvania in association with the Reading Railroad. The photographs in this series document the various interchanges between, facilities of, and industries served by the CNJ, the Lehigh Valley Railroad, the Delaware and Hudson Railroad, and the Pennsylvania Railroad. These include the Buttonwood Yards, Hazard Wire Works, and the Pit Tracks of the CNJ.
Box 53 Folder 9 1960
To the extreme right is the building where clerical staff is housed; the smaller building in the center houses the teletype clerk. Between the two buildings is the interchange track, and the pit track runs in front of the larger building. This is where CNJ interchanges cars with the PRR. The upper yard is in the center background of the photograph. The tracks leading from the center of the photograph to the lower left leads to the lower yard where inbound trains are switched for interchange and local delivery. To the extreme left is the D&H interchange. There are many public crossings.
Box 53 Folder 9
Box 53 Folder 10 1960
This shows the interchange between the PRR and the CNJ (also pictured in exhibit Z-1), looking northwest. There are no crossing gates, lights, bells, or other warnings for the public. The track in the foreground is the D&H interchange into Buttonwood Yard. The tracks in the background are leads to and from the the lower and upper yards where switch engines are workinf 24 hours a day. Parked automobiles create close clearance for railroad cars.
Box 53 Folder 10
Box 53 Folder 11 1960
Photograph shows foggy condition that occurs frequently in Wyoming Valley area. This weather condition can slow down yard movement because of low visibility.
Box 53 Folder 11
Box 53 Folder 12 1960
Track to the left are Pit Tracks, where engines are fueled, serviced, and stored. The fumes from the diesel engines can be hazardous to yard crews. Next tracks to right of Pit Track are called "The Flats." This is where yard crews switch the inbound trains in the lower yard. On occasion, yard crews have had been overcome by diesel fumes and have had to evacuate the yard.
Box 53 Folder 12
Box 53 Folder 13 1960
This is the PRR track at Hazard Wire Works used for industrial switching. This track is known as the Old Main, connecting Buttonwood Yard with the Wilkes-Barre Yard.The tracks running from left to right are the D&H Academy Street branch.
Box 53 Folder 13
Box 53 Folder 14 1960
Photograph taken facing north. This track is used to place cars at industries in the area. Many unprotected public crossings (partial view of crossing from exhibit Z-5). Parked automobiles foul tracks and create hazards.
Box 53 Folder 14
Box 53 Folder 15 1960
Photo taken facing south (opposite view to exhibit Z-6). This track is used to place cars at industries in the area. Many unprotected public crossings. This track leads to the Lehigh Valley main line. Parked automobiles foul tracks and create hazards.
Box 53 Folder 15
Box 53 Folder 16 1960
Track on left, called No. 2, leads to the Lehigh Valley Station and PRR Freight House. The PRR uses these tracks to place cars in the Wiles-barre produce markets. The tracks next to the Freight House lead to Buttonwood Yard. The signal in the middle of the photograph is for the LVRR main track movement through this area. To the right of the signal are the LVRR yard tracks, where switching is performed for movement of cars to Coxton Yard. Industrial switching performed in this yard.
Box 53 Folder 16
Box 53 Folder 17 1960
Photograph taken looking north. First three track from left are PRR yard tracks and the east and west bound LVRR main tracks. Cars on right are on leader ready for movement over the road. Freight cars are interchanged between PRR, LVRR, CNJ, D&H and local delivery services.
Box 53 Folder 17
Box 53 Folder 18 1960
The track on the left is the Old Main track on the PRR which leads into the freight house. The track on the right is the No. 2 track, which also has a lead into the freight house.
Box 53 Folder 18
Box 53 Folder 19 1960
This is a picture of the Lehigh Valley Yard at Wilkes Barre where the Jersey Central Lines and Pennsylvania railroad interchange. The track to the left is the PRR lead to Buttonwood Yard. The next tracks are PRR yard tracks two, three, and four. Further to the right are the LVRR east and west bound main tracks and the LVRR transfer yard. In the background behind the whistle board, located in the center of the picture, are the tracks used for interchanges between CNJ and LVRR.
Box 53 Folder 19
Box 53 Folder 33 1960
Photo taken facing south (opposite view to exhibit Z-6). This track is used to place cars at industries in the area. Many unprotected public crossings. This track leads to the Lehigh Valley main line. Parked automobiles foul tracks and create hazards.
Box 53 Folder 33
Box 53 Folder 35 1960
Photograph shows foggy condition that occurs frequently in Wyoming Valley area. This weather condition can slow down yard movement because of low visibility.
Box 53 Folder 35
Box 53 Folder 92 1960
From left to right: Old Main, tracks 2 and 4. Automobiles frequently block the tracks. This is where switching is performer for the industry. These is debris on the tracks, and close clearance for the cars.
Box 53 Folder 92
Box 53 Folder 93 1960
Another view of hazard Wire Works lead. Track 4 (track curving between the two buildings) is partially blocked by a parked automobile. Switches are submerged in standing water, creating work hazard. Weeds and debris also cover the tracks.
Box 53 Folder 93
Box 53 Folder 98 1960
Storage track on the PRR for Hazard Wire Works. Track on right is the oil siding; track on left with car on it is storage track. Notice the condition of the ties and the water and oil between the tracks. This results from lack of care for the tracks and creates a hazardous working environment.
Box 53 Folder 98
Box 58 Folder 147 1960
Same crossing as shown in exhibit Z-6.
Box 58 Folder 147
Box 58 Folder 148 1960
Same crossing as shown in exhibit Z-6.
Box 58 Folder 148
Box 58 Folder 151 1960
Manufacturer: ALCO Model: RS11. This is a picture of Buttonwood interchange between the Penn RR and Jersey Central Lines at Buttonwood.
Box 58 Folder 151
This series consists of photographs of the Chicago & North Western's facilities in Chicago, Illinois. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 22, are referred to by the letter E in testimony, and were taken by Henry G. Plock. Mr. Plock was employed by the C&NW in the Chicago Terminal Division as an engineer in switching and transfer service in the Proviso Yards and deliveries to foreign yards. The C&NW was a class I railroad operating in the Midwestern United States, operating as far west as Wyoming. The photographs in this series document both passenger and freight service by the C&NW including run westward out of Chicago through passenger stations, passenger trains in the Chicago terminal, the intricacies of tracks crossings and junctions in Chicago, the Wood Street Yard, and some of the Proviso Yards including the Hump Yard.
Box 53 Folder 2 1960
Pulling a passenger train. Manufacturer: EMD, Model GP 7
Box 53 Folder 2
Box 53 Folder 24 1960
CNW main line westbound to right, PRR to left. Approaching Western Avenue Interlocking Plant.
Box 53 Folder 24
Box 53 Folder 87 1960
Cars were burned here and the smoke would obscure the vision of train operators (same location as exhibit E-24). IHB is the reporting mark for Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad.
Box 53 Folder 87
Box 60 Folder 3 1960
Passenger train standing within the confines of the North Western passenger terminal. The engine is an EMD GP-7, it is pulling a passenger train. This passenger terminal as 16 tracks controlled by an interlocking plant at Clinton and Lake Streets.
Box 60 Folder 3
Box 60 Folder 4 1960
Pulling a passenger train. Manufacturer: EMD, Model GP 7. Same train as exhibit E-1 from the opposite side. Note here the platform with passengers and employees standing in the extreme right hand corner of the picture toward the center.
Box 60 Folder 4
Box 60 Folder 5 1960
Portion of main line between Western Avenue and the Kedzie Interlocking plant. The right is CNW's coach yard. Note the pile of ties and also lengths of rails extending along the right of way here.
Box 60 Folder 5
Box 60 Folder 6 1960
Shows a portion of the Kedzie Avenue interlocking plant and shows the various types of interlocking plant and he various types of interlocking switches. Covered wagon type locomotive in the center of the picture is standing at the interlocking dwarf signal preparatory to passing into or through the Kedzie Avenue interlocking plant. This signal is on the left hand side and must be observed by the fireman.
Box 60 Folder 6
Box 60 Folder 7 1960
Main line through Chicago suburb, picture is of a North Western main line near Oak Park, Illinois. Note the loose rails and ties on the right side of the picture where workmen are laying a new track. Constant lookout here is necessary for workmen.
Box 60 Folder 7
Box 60 Folder 8 1960
Passenger train headed west, pulling out of the station. The picture itself is looking east. The train is on the 19th Avenue crossing, one of the main streets in Melrose Park.
Box 60 Folder 8
Box 60 Folder 9 1960
Passenger train on westbound CNW main line approaching an interlocking signal which is on the left side of the engine. This signal governs all westbound main line movements through this interlocking plant, regardless of whether the movement be passenger train, or yard movement destined for the Proviso yards. In this situation, with the cab of the engine forward, the signal will pass from the view of the engineer when it is within 30 feet or so of the engine. Without a fireman on the left looking out from his side of the engine, the engineer can never be certain that a signal has not changed after it has passed from his view.
Box 60 Folder 9
Box 60 Folder 10 1960
North Western main line track and the Maywood lead track, which a section crew is working on with a Burro Crane. Industry in in upper left hand corner is National Malleable and Steel Castings Corporation. Constant lookout is necessary here because of workmen in the area and debris scattered long the right of way and the lead, including scraps of rail, ties, and other impediments. High speed passenger trains as well as freight service operate on the same tracks and because of the impediments and debris along the way, extreme vigilance must be maintained in lookout out for workmen and trespassers, who are on and about the tracks.
Box 60 Folder 10
Box 60 Folder 11 1960
Passenger train operating westward along the main line approaching the east end of Elmhurst, Illinois; the Poplar Avenue crossing is down the track, where an automobile is driving across the tracks. The train has just moved around a slight curve. Note the tail end of the curve towards the middle of the picture. In the center of the picture in the distance is an overhead signal marking the Poplar Avenue crossing. Note also in the left of the picture the housing and play equipment for children and the dense bushes and shrubs along the right of way.
Box 60 Folder 11
Box 60 Folder 12 1960
Looking east of the Cottage Hill Avenue crossing, showing the three main line tracks of the North Western. The track in the center of the picture is the westbound main line track, the track to the left of it, or the center track, is used in either direction, and the track on the extreme left is the eastbound main line track. The road freight train here is moving through one of the most heavily trafficked crossings in Elmhurst. The North Western itself has very heavy passenger traffic out of this station.
Box 60 Folder 12
Box 60 Folder 13 1960
The yard has 29 tracks plus three main line tracks (Nos. 19, 20, and 30). This is the point of origin of the humping operations in Proviso. Various industries are served here, including General Foods Corporation.
Box 60 Folder 13
Box 60 Folder 14 1960
CNW Unit #1649, EMD GP-7. Shows the south end of Yard 9 and indicates the curvatures of all tracks as well as gives some indication of the number of workmen in the area. Note also the rocks, stones, pieces of wood, and scrap metal that are scattered throughout the yard, which make it easier for men on the ground. Also shows the 20 main and 19 main lines.
Box 60 Folder 14
Box 60 Folder 15 1960
Another view of south end of Yard 9 at the junction of the hump leads. Shows the 20 main and 19 main lines.
Box 60 Folder 15
Box 60 Folder 16 1960
Shows the curves and main line tracks 19 and 20. Taken in the same general area as E-15, but shows more clearly the curves and main line tracks 19 and 20. Switchman signalling with arms extended.
Box 60 Folder 16
Box 60 Folder 17 1960
CNW Unit #1776 pushing a train southward over the hump. The train is moving away from the photographer.
Box 60 Folder 17
Box 60 Folder 18 1960
CNW loco #1776 pushing a train southward over the hump, showing curve of track. Another view of the operation shown in exhibits E-16 and E-17. Here the track curvatures and hump leads going down and around to the left of the picture which is toward the south here are more clearly shown. Also shows the maze of switches that join here and the cross-overs through the area. These conditions exist generally throughout the yard and accidents caused by derailments and sideswipes have been frequent in Yard 9. Switchman to the right of the picture is giving a signal to the road train that is hidden by the cars in the photograph.
Box 60 Folder 18
Box 60 Folder 19 1960
Shows cars being pushed over the crest of the hump at Proviso Yard. The building in the center is the general yardmaster's station. There are various hump signals that extend all he way to North Avenue. Two of these signals are shown just to the left of the yardmaster's station. In the foreground are tracks 24, 25, and 26 (26 is barely discernible). Note the broken ties along the right-hand side of the picture, and various trees and weeds which obscure positions of the track. Constant lookout is imperative at all times.
Box 60 Folder 19
Box 60 Folder 20 1960
Taken at the crest of the hump. Building shown at right is the yardmaster's office, and pole in the center is mast of one of the hump signals. The tank car in the center of the picture is entering the first of a series of retarders which run along the length of the lead into the classification tracks in the yard proper. The B & O gondola is just progressing over the hump. There is a tremendous congestion and movement in this hump area. The fireman is definitely necessary in hump operations to maintain constant lookout. When the engine is within view of the crest of the hump, only the fireman could see the brakemen or other employees standing between the two hump leads at the crest.
Box 60 Folder 20
Box 60 Folder 21 1960
Shows the lower level hump in operation and gives a picture of the classification tracks in the yard. Large number of tracks in the background of the photograph. There are 62 classification tracks.
Box 60 Folder 21
Box 60 Folder 22 1960
Taken at the east end of Yard No. 2 at Proviso Yard. It shows the close clearances on all of the tracks here. Cars are badly damages and headed for the scrap heap.
Box 60 Folder 22
Box 60 Folder 23 1960
Shows the east end of Yard No. 4 and a portion of Yard No. 2, which has materials stored for use by section crews. The tracks in the foreground are main lines used by the Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad (IHB) operations and also for servicing, through the cross-over lead into Yard 4, the various industries around Melrose Park, including National Malleable and Steel Casting Company and American Can Company. The third track looking at the picture from right to left, is the cross-over from 19 main line leading into Yard No. 4. The road and crossing are used by cement trucks, other construction equipment, and men in the area.
Box 60 Folder 23
Box 60 Folder 24 1960
Cars were burned here and the smoke would obscure the vision of train operators. Photograph shows the junk yard with some burning freight cars. When cars are burning here in the junk yard, the smoke can impede the view of the tracks, making a most vigilant lookout necessary. IHB is the reporting mark for Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad.
Box 60 Folder 24
Box 60 Folder 25 1960
Yard No. 4 is in the foreground. This picture is looking westward from the crest of the Manheim Road Bridge. In the background to the left is Yard No. 2. Tracks 17 to 21 in Yard 4 are extended into Yard 2. The track curvature in the yard is apparent. Because of the curves, it is also necessary at times to pass signals on the fireman's side. This yard operates 24 hours a day, yet has no flood lights within its confines besides the lights shown in the center of the picture in the background, which is the east end of Yard No. 5. Note also the debris between all of these tracks in the foreground.
Box 60 Folder 25
Box 60 Folder 26 1960
Showing part of Yard No. 2. This yard operates 24 hours a day, yet has no flood lights within its confines
Box 60 Folder 26
Box 60 Folder 27 1960
Southeasterly view of the railroad crossing at Taylor and Rockwell Streets in Chicago. The tracks in the immediate foreground belong to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Tracks on the extreme left are the Chicago and North Western tracks leading to its Wood Street Yard. The tracks bisecting the foregoing tracks running left to right across the picture are those of the B & O, Soo Line, and Chicago Great Western Railroads. Cross-over movements here are frequent and a lookout must be maintained at all times on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 60 Folder 27
Box 60 Folder 28 1960
Northwesterly view of the Taylor and Rockwell Streets area. Note the extreme curvature of the B & O tracks here, which makes it necessary for the firemen to maintain a lookout.
Box 60 Folder 28
Box 60 Folder 29 1960
Orderly view of the Taylor and Rockwell Streets area, with the Taylor Street viaduct in the center of the picture. Various industries are served along the tracks here on the left by the North Western, and on the right by the Pennsylvania Railroad. Signals must frequently be passed on fireman's side because of close clearances. Industries are Wheeling Corrugating Industry and a foundry (located toward the edge of the picture). Close clearance on the viaduct, indicated by the black and white strips painted on the girders along the entire length of the trackage. The three Chicago and North Western tracks on the left of the picture branch into or cross the Pennsylvania tracks in the right foreground. The Wood Street yard in Chicago Junction Railroad tracks are in the right center of the picture.
Box 60 Folder 29
Box 60 Folder 30 1960
Taken at a point just to the right of where exhibit E-29 was taken. Shows more clearly the close clearances. Track in the foreground is Track No. 1 and leads to the Wood Street yards.
Box 60 Folder 30
Box 60 Folder 31 1960
Easterly view of the Chicago and North Western's Wood Street yard. The tracks in the lower left hand portion of the picture, where you can see the roof of a boxcar, are the switch leads for the B&O Robey Street Yard (see B&O Chicago photographs by J.B. Redmond). The two tracks further to the right are the B&O main lines. In the center of the picture is the Chicago and North Western yard, which used to be called the Bull Run. Note the reverse ladder tracks here which mean that regardless of which way an engine in headed, signals at one time or another will have to be given on the fireman's side. Note also the curvature of the tracks in the right center background of the picture.
Box 60 Folder 31
Box 60 Folder 116 1960
CNW Unit #1057 Fairbanks Morse shoving three cars into the yard. Same general area as E-31 but looking to the west instead of the east. At the extreme upper left corner of the picture is a Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy passenger train. In the left corner of the picture is a Northwestern Fairbanks-Morse locomotive shoving three cars into the Northwestern Wood Street yard. Across the top of the cars being shoved is a portion of the Northwestern's potato yard, and beyond that is the Midland warehouse and other buildings which run along Western Avenue. To the right of these tracks, switches along the yard lead to the Chicago and Northwestern main lines running through the Wood Street district. The automatic block signal in the center of the picture shows the B & O main line tracks which come in at the extreme lower right-hand portion of the picture. The boxcar in the foreground from the roof of which this picture was taken is spotted on the B & O track at Robey Street, now called Damon Avenue. The curvatures on the Northwestern tracks are apparent. (This photograph was taken in the same location as Exhibit G-2 in the B&O Chicago photographs by J. B. Redmond).
Box 60 Folder 116
Box 62 Folder 2 1960
Shows a portion of the Kedzie Avenue interlocking plant (see Exhibit E-5 for a closer view).
Box 62 Folder 2
Box 62 Folder 3 1960
The yard has 29 tracks plus three main line tracks (Nos. 19, 20, and 30). This is the point of origin of the humping operations in Proviso. Various industries are served here, including General Foods Corporation.
Box 62 Folder 3
Box 62 Folder 4 1960
CNW Unit #1649, EMD GP-7. Shows the south end of Yard 9 and indicates the curvatures of all tracks as well as gives some indication of the number of workmen in the area. Note also the rocks, stones, pieces of wood, and scrap metal that are scattered throughout the yard, which make it easier for men on the ground. Also shows the 20 main and 19 main lines.
Box 62 Folder 4
Box 62 Folder 5 1960
Shows the lower level hump in operation and gives a picture of the classification tracks in the yard. Large number of tracks in the background of the photograph. There are 62 classification tracks.
Box 62 Folder 5
Box 62 Folder 6 1960
CNW Unit #4101-A
Box 62 Folder 6
Box 62 Folder 7 1960
C&NW Unit #4101-A
Box 62 Folder 7
Box 62 Folder 8 1960
Cars were burned here and the smoke would obscure the vision of train operators. Photograph shows the junk yard with some burning freight cars. When cars are burning here in the junk yard, the smoke can impede the view of the tracks, making a most vigilant lookout necessary. IHB is the reporting mark for Indiana Harbor Belt Railroad.
Box 62 Folder 8
Box 62 Folder 9 1960
Southeasterly view of the railroad crossing at Taylor and Rockwell Streets in Chicago. The tracks in the immediate foreground belong to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Tracks on the extreme left are the Chicago and North Western tracks leading to its Wood Street Yard. The tracks bisecting the foregoing tracks running left to right across the picture are those of the B & O, Soo Line, and Chicago Great Western Railroads. Cross-over movements here are frequent and a lookout must be maintained at all times on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 62 Folder 9
Box 62 Folder 10 1960
Southeasterly view of the railroad crossing at Taylor and Rockwell Streets in Chicago. The tracks in the immediate foreground belong to the Pennsylvania Railroad. Tracks on the extreme left are the Chicago and North Western tracks leading to its Wood Street Yard. The tracks bisecting the foregoing tracks running left to right across the picture are those of the B & O, Soo Line, and Chicago Great Western Railroads. Cross-over movements here are frequent and a lookout must be maintained at all times on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 62 Folder 10
Box 62 Folder 11 1960
Close up of track crossovers and diamond crossings.
Box 62 Folder 11
Box 62 Folder 12 1960
Looking east from 14th Street and Damen (formerly Robey Street) Avenue. B&O main lines are in the center of the photograph, with ballast under the ties. St Adalbert's Catholic Church is in the background.
Box 62 Folder 12
Box 62 Folder 13 1960
CNW Unit with three cars; fireman spotting movement. St Adalbert's Catholic Church is in the background.
Box 62 Folder 13
Box 63 Folder 145 1960
Pulling a passenger train. Manufacturer: EMD, Model GP 7
Box 63 Folder 145
This series consists of photographs of the Chicago River and Indiana Railroad's facilities in Chicago, Illinois. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 45, are referred to by the letter K in testimony, and were taken by Donald H. Anderson. Mr. Anderson was employed by the Chicago River and Indiana as an engineer and was a member of the BLF&E. The Chicago River and Indiana operated a belt, switching, and terminal railroad in the metropolitan Chicago area serving approximately 400 industries; the railroad grew out of the need to link the Union Stockyards with the other carriers entering Chicago. The photographs in this series document the movements made by trains on this line through industries and city streets. The Chicago Hygrade Meat Packing Plant and its operations are also extensively documented, as are the surrounding streets. One picture in this series (box 56, folder 143) has been tentatively included based on the appearance that it was taken in the Union Stockyards; this identification may be incorrect.
Box 56 Folder 131 1960
Shows cars being shoved into warehouse No. 3 at 4000 South Wallace Street. The signals are passed on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 131
Box 56 Folder 132 1960
Shows cars being shoved into warehouse No. 3 at 4000 South Wallace Street. The signals are passed on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 132
Box 56 Folder 133 1960
Shows the Globe Plant at 40th and Stewart and indicates how vital it is to have a fireman on the engine. Observe the equipment lying on the ground, the little group of employees standing off in the center of the picture and the close clearances throughout. Because of the S curve, only the fireman on the left can see these men, cars, and equipment.
Box 56 Folder 133
Box 56 Folder 134 1960
Shows cars being shoved through the Globe Steel Company building to service other plants over a public crossing. Notice the very close clearances on both sides of the track which make it imperative to maintain a watch on both sides. Since the track curves to the left, only the fireman can see ahead.
Box 56 Folder 134
Box 56 Folder 135 1960
Shows cars being shoved through the Globe Steel Company building to service other plants over a public crossing. Notice the very close clearances on both sides of the track which make it imperative to maintain a watch on both sides. Since the track curves to the left, only the fireman can see ahead.
Box 56 Folder 135
Box 56 Folder 136 1960
Hump yard located at 4100 South Damen Avenue. It has 12 receiving tracks and 25 classification tracks. Same engine and cut of cars as exhibit K-1. The engine is now backed up to a point past the repeater board where the engineer is unable to see the signals. Only the fireman has the signals on this repeater board in view.
Box 56 Folder 136
Box 56 Folder 137 1960
Shows a hump yard located at 4100 South Damen Avenue. It has 12 receiving tracks and 25 classification tracks. In this picture we see a hump engine backing out of a receiving yard with a cut of cars. Signals are taken by the fireman as he watches the board on his side. Because of the curvature of the track and the car itself, the engineer cannot see the signal board. As the train continues to back up, a repeater board comes into view which displays the signals on both sides. After passing this board, again the engineer cannot see the board so that the signals are on the fireman's side only.
Box 56 Folder 137
Box 56 Folder 138 1960
Shows a hump yard located at 4100 South Damen Avenue. It has 12 receiving tracks and 25 classification tracks. In this picture we see a hump engine backing out of a receiving yard with a cut of cars. Signals are taken by the fireman as he watches the board on his side. Because of the curvature of the track and the car itself, the engineer cannot see the signal board. As the train continues to back up, a repeater board comes into view which displays the signals on both sides. After passing this board, again the engineer cannot see the board so that the signals are on the fireman's side only.
Box 56 Folder 138
Box 56 Folder 139 1960
Hump yard at 4100 South Damen Avenue. The fireman is watching the signal board as neither he nor the engineer is able to see the repeater board.
Box 56 Folder 139
Box 56 Folder 140 1960
Hump yard at 4100 South Damen Avenue. Taken in an easterly direction into the receiving yard. The engine is just past the repeater board. The fireman is looking back at the board and the engineer has to look forward in the direction the train is going. He is unable to see any signals which were given on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 140
Box 56 Folder 141 1960
CR&I RR Unit #8407. Taken on the Western Avenue Bridge at 3900 South Western Avenue. The fireman is giving the engineer a signal to go ahead. The engineer can't see the signal board because the signals are on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 141
Box 56 Folder 142 1960
CR&I RR Unit #8407. 3900 South Western Avenue, on Western Avenue Bridge. Photograph shows an engine humping cars in an eastward direction. The view shown is a view on the engineer's side of the engine. The signals shown are not for the tracks on which the engine is located, but are the signal boards of the Baltimore and Ohio main line tracks (at right of picture). There are no signals in view from the engineer's side. All of the signals are located on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 142
Box 56 Folder 143 1960
Tentatively identified as part of the CRI Railroad photographs. Location most likely an industrial siding in the Union Stock Yards in Chicago, which is now the New City neighborhood of Chicago.
Box 56 Folder 143
Box 56 Folder 144 1960
Shows an engine shoving into a classification track. The picture is taken on the left side of the engine. As you can see, the fireman has a good view of what is ahead of him and keeps the engineer informed as to where he is going. Since the engineer is on a curve at this point, he is unable to see the tracks leading into the yard.
Box 56 Folder 144
Box 56 Folder 145 1960
Shows, on the left, a cut of cars being shoved from the Halsted Street yard. You can see the fireman's head sticking out of the locomotive in the center background. He is the lookout for clearances, position of switches and oncoming traffic while crossing over two main lines to perform work on the south side of the railroad.
Box 56 Folder 145
Box 56 Folder 146 1960
Note employee riding on the side of the boxcar.
Box 56 Folder 146
Box 56 Folder 147 1960
Shows the shoving of cars at 48th and Emerald Avenue in the Halstead Street car yard, which is on a curve. The fireman is observing the distance the engine has to go before coupling onto cars in the yard. A hard coupling may cause considerable shock and damage.
Box 56 Folder 147
Box 56 Folder 148 1960
Close clearance on both sides.
Box 56 Folder 148
Box 56 Folder 149 1960
Close clearance on both sides.
Box 56 Folder 149
Box 56 Folder 150 1960
Close clearance on both sides.
Box 56 Folder 150
Box 56 Folder 151 1960
Shows the loading platform of the Hygrade Plant. A switch is being made by men working on the fireman's side. Signals cannot be passed on the engineer's side because of the inventory hanging on the platform. Observe how important it is to keep a very close watch at this point because of the Hygrade personnel working right next to the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 151
Box 56 Folder 152 1960
Shows the loading platform of the Hygrade Plant. A switch is being made by men working on the fireman's side. Signals cannot be passed on the engineer's side because of the inventory hanging on the platform. Observe how important it is to keep a very close watch at this point because of the Hygrade personnel working right next to the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 152
Box 56 Folder 153 1960
Close clearance, on Emerald Avenue by Hygrade Plant.
Box 56 Folder 153
Box 56 Folder 154 1960
Shows the Manhattan Brewery on the right. When cars are shoved in on this track only the fireman would see any automobiles parked on the track, the engineer being unable to see them because of the track curvature.
Box 56 Folder 154
Box 56 Folder 155 1960
CRI Unit #9811. Photograph shows an engine coming out of the New Century Plant just east of the Manhattan Brewery. The fireman is observing a private crossing and switches ahead, which the engineer cannot see because of the curvature.
Box 56 Folder 155
Box 56 Folder 156 1960
Industry siding of the New Century Plant, just east of the Manhattan Brewery.
Box 56 Folder 156
Box 56 Folder 157 1960
CRI Unit #9811. Photograph shows an engine coming out of the New Century Plant just east of the Manhattan Brewery. The fireman is observing a private crossing and switches ahead, which the engineer cannot see because of the curvature.
Box 56 Folder 157
Box 56 Folder 158 1960
CRI Unit #9811. Photograph shows an engine coming out of the New Century Plant just east of the Manhattan Brewery. The fireman is observing a private crossing and switches ahead, which the engineer cannot see because of the curvature.
Box 56 Folder 158
Box 56 Folder 159 1960
CRI Unit #9811. An engine is pulling cars out of the Manhattan Brewery. The fireman is watching out for trucks and automobiles which use the private crossing shown in the picture. The fireman is also looking out for the position of the switch at the top of the hill. Frequently employees walk across these tracks. The engineer is unable to see them due to the curvature of the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 159
Box 56 Folder 160 1960
CRI Unit #9811. An engine is pulling cars out of the Manhattan Brewery. The fireman is watching out for trucks and automobiles which use the private crossing shown in the picture. The fireman is also looking out for the position of the switch at the top of the hill. Frequently employees walk across these tracks. The engineer is unable to see them due to the curvature of the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 160
Box 56 Folder 161 1960
Shows switching movements at the Hygrade Packing Plant at 3900 South Emerald Avenue. As you can see from the picture, Emerald Avenue is a through street and traffic is very heavy. All signals are on the fireman's side. Notice in the picture how close the automobile traffic moves to the train.
Box 56 Folder 161
Box 56 Folder 162 1960
Shows switching movements at the Hygrade Packing Plant at 3900 South Emerald Avenue. As you can see from the picture, Emerald Avenue is a through street and traffic is very heavy. All signals are on the fireman's side. Notice in the picture how close the automobile traffic moves to the train.
Box 56 Folder 162
Box 56 Folder 163 1960
Taken in and around the Hygrade Plant. It shows a switching operation at the plant. The signals are passed on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 163
Box 56 Folder 164 1960
Taken in and around the Hygrade Plant. It shows a switching operation at the plant. The signals are passed on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 164
Box 56 Folder 165 1960
Shows a switch being made at the inside track of the Hygrade Plant. Observe how the brakeman is working on the left side of the engine and will have to give the signal to the fireman. Note also the automobile parked between the two tracks. Over on the right are two automobiles are sandwiched between the boxer and the tank-car in the rear. Notice also in the rear of the picture the automobile which is crossing the tracks just behind the car which is being coupled.
Box 56 Folder 165
Box 56 Folder 166 1960
Switching operation at Hygrade Plant on South Emerald Avenue, fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 166
Box 56 Folder 167 1960
Shows another view around the Hygrade Plant. Again notice how the tracks cross the public street, the pedestrian traffic in and around the plant and the passenger cars, which pass very close to the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 167
Box 56 Folder 168a 1960
Switching operation at Hygrade Plant on South Emerald Avenue, fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 168a
Box 56 Folder 168b 1960
Shows the switching operation in progress at the Hygrade Packing Plant. notice how the tracks head across the public streets. Notice also the very heavy volume of traffic and the large number of pedestrians working around the tracks on both sides of the street.
Box 56 Folder 168b
Box 56 Folder 169 1960
Shows another view around the Hygrade Plant. Again notice how the tracks cross the public street, the pedestrian traffic in and around the plant and the passenger cars, which pass very close to the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 169
Box 56 Folder 170 1960
Switching operation at plant. Notice how close tracks are to public street. Wider view of clearance at same curve as seen in exhibit K-10.
Box 56 Folder 170
Box 56 Folder 171 1960
The train is coming out of the Hygrade Plant. Traffic is going south on a one-way street. Again, due to curvature of the track, the traffic, going south on the street, can be viewed only by the fireman as the engineer's view is cut off.
Box 56 Folder 171
Box 56 Folder 172 1960
Shows Hygrade Plant on the right and Manhattan Brewing on the left. Signals are taken on fireman's side at both locations. Because of close clearances and parked automobiles, sharp lookout must be maintained on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 56 Folder 172
Box 56 Folder 173 1960
Shows a car being set out near the Hygrade Plant. The brakeman is working on the fireman's side of the engine. Notice how he is giving the signal.
Box 56 Folder 173
Box 56 Folder 174 1960
CRI Unit #9811. Shows an overall view of the Hygrade Plant and the surrounding streets. An automobile in the foreground is parked close to the tracks. There is also a heavy volume of traffic on the street. The traffic shown in the picture can only be seen by the fireman. Notice also the congestion around the tracks shown over to the right where the jeep is working right on the tracks. Also notice how the signals are being given on the fireman's side. It is impossible to give signals on the engineer's side due to the curvature of the track. There is no protection at this crossing other than the cross-arm sign.
Box 56 Folder 174
Box 56 Folder 175 1960
Taken out of the back window of the cab of the locomotive and shows the fireman taking signals at the 40th and Wallace crossing over two main line tracks. It is apparent from the picture that the engineer would be unable to see the man giving the signals.
Box 56 Folder 175
Box 56 Folder 176 1960
Taken out back window of locomotive. Another view at the 40th and Normal Avenue crossing. The fireman is watching for the clearance of cars and is also watching out for the safety of any pedestrians who might be in the area.
Box 56 Folder 176
Box 56 Folder 177 1960
We see the fireman taking signals at the 40th and Wallace crossing while the switchman is throwing the switch. Again it is obvious, form the curvature of the track, that the engineer would be unable to see the switchman.
Box 56 Folder 177
This series consists of photographs of the facilities in Denver, Colorado's Burnham Yards. These photographs were not submitted to the Commission and as such do not have identifying exhibit numbers. These photographs document railroad facilities in and around Denver, Colorado. This includes industries around Cherry Creek, the Rio Grande's Car Shops and Freight Yards, AT&SF Yards, Denver Union Station and its passenger Yards, and grade crossings in industrial areas. Because these photographs were not used before the Commission, there is limited descriptive data for some of the images. As the Burnham Shops and Yards were the hub of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad, it is likely that these photographs were taken by one of its employees. The D&RGW was a class I railroad operating in the western United States between Colorado and California.
Box 60 Folder 37 1960
Car shop and passenger cars on tracks.
Box 60 Folder 37
Box 63 Folder 116 1960
Freight cars, gondolas and tank car in picture as well.
Box 63 Folder 116
Box 63 Folder 117 1960
1500 block of Wykoop Street, downtown Denver. Railroad tracks running next to loading platforms and loading docks.
Box 63 Folder 117
Box 63 Folder 118 1960
Freight cars on tracks next to loading platforms.
Box 63 Folder 118
Box 63 Folder 119 1960
Freight houses to right of frame.
Box 63 Folder 119
Box 63 Folder 120 1960
Bridge over Cherry Creek, downtown Denver, between 14th and 16th Streets.
Box 63 Folder 120
Box 63 Folder 146 1960
D&RGW Unit #5651; D&RGW Unit #74. Tracks leading to car shop and turntable
Box 63 Folder 146
Box 63 Folder 147 1960
These are tracks of the Denver Rio Grande Western Railroad at Burnam Yard in Denver.
Box 63 Folder 147
Box 63 Folder 148 1960
Box 63 Folder 148
Box 63 Folder 149 1960
Box 63 Folder 149
Box 63 Folder 150 1960
Box 63 Folder 150
Box 63 Folder 151 1960
Car shop and passenger cars on tracks.
Box 63 Folder 151
Box 63 Folder 152 1960
Location in downtown Denver.
Box 63 Folder 152
Box 63 Folder 153 1960
Tank cars in foreground are not on tracks.
Box 63 Folder 153
Box 63 Folder 154 1960
Box 63 Folder 154
Box 63 Folder 155 1960
Corner of Market and 21st Street, in downtown Denver.
Box 63 Folder 155
Box 63 Folder 156 1960
Corner of Market and 21st Street, in downtown Denver.
Box 63 Folder 156
Box 63 Folder 157 1960
Bridge over Cherry Creek, downtown Denver
Box 63 Folder 157
Box 63 Folder 158 1960
Bridge over Cherry Creek, downtown Denver, between 14th and 16th Streets.
Box 63 Folder 158
Box 63 Folder 159 1960
Bridge over Cherry Creek, downtown Denver, between 14th and 16th Streets.
Box 63 Folder 159
Box 63 Folder 160 1960
1500 block of Wykoop Street, downtown Denver. Railroad tracks running next to loading platforms and loading docks.
Box 63 Folder 160
Box 63 Folder 161 1960
Location probably in downtown Denver.
Box 63 Folder 161
Box 63 Folder 162 1960
Looking at freight cars, tank cars, and hopper cars on tracks towards Union Station. Passenger cars are in the background.
Box 63 Folder 162
Box 63 Folder 163 1960
DRGW Unit #5651; Burnham Yard Shops and turntable.
Box 63 Folder 163
Box 63 Folder 164 1960
Empire Gas and Electric Equipment industry in right of photograph.
Box 63 Folder 164
Box 63 Folder 165 1960
Box 63 Folder 165
Box 63 Folder 166 1960
Empire Gas and Electric Equipment industry in right of photograph.
Box 63 Folder 166
This series consists of photographs of the Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway's facilities in Minnesota. These photographs were not submitted to the Commission and as such do not have identifying exhibit numbers. The Duluth, Missabe and Iron Range Railway is a railroad operating in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin that hauled iron ore and later taconite to the Great Lakes ports of Duluth and Two Harbors, Minnesota. The photographs document the trackage, viaducts, ore docks, ships, coal yards, and carrier facilities as well as extensive documentation from inside the locomotive cab of a DM&IR train hauling coal hoppers. The viaducts and ore docks are located in either Duluth or Two Harbors, Minnesota The train yards are most likely in Proctor, Minnesota; other locations are unidentified. Because these photographs were not used before the Commission, there is limited descriptive data for some of the images.
Box 59 Folder 97
DMIR Unit #1204
Box 59 Folder 97
Box 59 Folder 98
DMIR Units 1204 and 1206
Box 59 Folder 98
Box 59 Folder 99
DMIR Unit 1202
Box 59 Folder 99
Box 59 Folder 100
Box 59 Folder 100
Box 59 Folder 101
Box 59 Folder 101
Box 59 Folder 102
Box 59 Folder 102
Box 59 Folder 103
DMIR Unit 1205
Box 59 Folder 103
Box 59 Folder 104
DMIR Units 1204 and 1206
Box 59 Folder 104
Box 59 Folder 105
Box 59 Folder 105
Box 59 Folder 106
DMIR Ore Cars 33060 and 27072. Ore train and slug in background.
Box 59 Folder 106
Box 59 Folder 107
On viaduct to loading docks and container ships.
Box 59 Folder 107
Box 59 Folder 108
On viaduct to loading docks and container ships. Cab view from engineer's side on approach to the ore dock
Box 59 Folder 108
Box 59 Folder 109
DMIR Unit 180 (manufacturer: EMD model: SD 18) with ship, the U.S.S. Elbert H. Gary.
Box 59 Folder 109
Box 59 Folder 110
On viaduct to loading docks and container ships. Cab view from fireman's side on approach to the ore dock.
Box 59 Folder 110
Box 59 Folder 111
On viaduct. View from fireman's side of the cab.
Box 59 Folder 111
Box 59 Folder 112
On viaduct to loading docks and container ships. Cab view from fireman's side on approach to the ore dock.
Box 59 Folder 112
Box 59 Folder 113
Box 59 Folder 113
Box 59 Folder 114
DMIR caboose.
Box 59 Folder 114
Box 59 Folder 115
Box 59 Folder 115
Box 59 Folder 116
DMIR caboose.
Box 59 Folder 116
Box 59 Folder 117
Box 59 Folder 117
Box 59 Folder 118
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 59 Folder 118
Box 59 Folder 119
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 59 Folder 119
Box 59 Folder 120
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 59 Folder 120
Box 59 Folder 121
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 59 Folder 121
Box 59 Folder 122
Box 59 Folder 122
Box 59 Folder 123
Box 59 Folder 123
Box 59 Folder 124
Box 59 Folder 124
Box 59 Folder 125
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 9
Box 59 Folder 125
Box 59 Folder 126
Box 59 Folder 126
Box 59 Folder 127
Box 59 Folder 127
Box 59 Folder 128
Box 59 Folder 128
Box 59 Folder 129
View out of fireman's side of cab. Photograph labeled "End of Block."
Box 59 Folder 129
Box 59 Folder 130
Box 59 Folder 130
Box 59 Folder 132
Box 59 Folder 132
Box 59 Folder 133
Box 59 Folder 133
Box 59 Folder 134
Box 59 Folder 134
Box 59 Folder 135
Box 59 Folder 135
Box 59 Folder 136
DMIR Unit 180, Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 18, with ore cars.
Box 59 Folder 136
Box 59 Folder 137
DMIR Unit 180, Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 18, with ore cars.
Box 59 Folder 137
Box 59 Folder 138
Box 59 Folder 138
Box 59 Folder 139
Box 59 Folder 139
Box 59 Folder 140
Box 59 Folder 140
Box 59 Folder 141
DMIR Unit 180, Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 18, with ore cars.
Box 59 Folder 141
Box 59 Folder 142
Box 59 Folder 142
Box 59 Folder 143
Box 59 Folder 143
Box 59 Folder 144
Box 59 Folder 144
Box 59 Folder 145
Box 59 Folder 145
Box 59 Folder 146
Box 59 Folder 146
Box 59 Folder 147
Box 59 Folder 147
Box 59 Folder 148
Box 59 Folder 148
Box 59 Folder 149
View from fireman's side of locomotive.
Box 59 Folder 149
Box 59 Folder 150
Box 59 Folder 150
Box 59 Folder 151
Box 59 Folder 151
Box 59 Folder 152
Unknown Locomotive.
Box 59 Folder 152
Box 59 Folder 153
Box 59 Folder 153
Box 59 Folder 154
Box 59 Folder 154
Box 60 Folder 38
Duluth RR (see box 59, f 114)
Box 60 Folder 38
Box 60 Folder 39
Full ore cars in background.
Box 60 Folder 39
Box 60 Folder 40
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 60 Folder 40
Box 60 Folder 41
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 60 Folder 41
Box 60 Folder 42
Box 60 Folder 42
Box 60 Folder 43
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 18
Box 60 Folder 43
Box 60 Folder 44
Box 60 Folder 44
Box 60 Folder 45
Approaching viaduct and ore docks. DMIR Caboose C-161.
Box 60 Folder 45
Box 60 Folder 46
Box 60 Folder 46
Box 60 Folder 47
Unknown Locomotive.
Box 60 Folder 47
Box 60 Folder 48
Box 60 Folder 48
Box 60 Folder 49
View from fireman's side of locomotive.
Box 60 Folder 49
Box 60 Folder 50
Box 60 Folder 50
Box 60 Folder 51
Box 60 Folder 51
Box 60 Folder 52
Big container ships at ore dock.
Box 60 Folder 52
Box 60 Folder 53
DM&IR Unit 123 pulling a caboose with employees riding on the back.
Box 60 Folder 53
Box 60 Folder 54
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 18
Box 60 Folder 54
Box 60 Folder 55
Box 60 Folder 55
Box 60 Folder 56
DMIR Ore Cars 33060 and 27072. Ore train and slug in background.
Box 60 Folder 56
Box 60 Folder 57
Box 60 Folder 57
Box 60 Folder 58
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 9
Box 60 Folder 58
Box 60 Folder 59
Box 60 Folder 59
Box 60 Folder 60
Box 60 Folder 60
Box 60 Folder 61
Box 60 Folder 61
Box 60 Folder 62
Box 60 Folder 62
Box 60 Folder 63
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 60 Folder 63
Box 60 Folder 64
Box 60 Folder 64
Box 60 Folder 65
Box 60 Folder 65
Box 60 Folder 66
Box 60 Folder 66
Box 60 Folder 67
Box 60 Folder 67
Box 60 Folder 68
Box 60 Folder 68
Box 60 Folder 69
Box 60 Folder 69
Box 60 Folder 70
Box 60 Folder 70
Box 60 Folder 71
Box 60 Folder 71
Box 60 Folder 72
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SD 9.
Box 60 Folder 72
Box 60 Folder 73
Maintenance of Way employee.
Box 60 Folder 73
Box 60 Folder 74
Box 60 Folder 74
Box 60 Folder 75
Box 60 Folder 75
Box 60 Folder 76
Taken from cab of DMIR Unit 180.
Box 60 Folder 76
Box 60 Folder 77
Box 60 Folder 77
Box 60 Folder 78
Box 60 Folder 78
Box 60 Folder 79
Box 60 Folder 79
Box 60 Folder 80
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 60 Folder 80
Box 60 Folder 81
Box 60 Folder 81
Box 60 Folder 82
Box 60 Folder 82
Box 60 Folder 83
Box 60 Folder 83
Box 60 Folder 84
Box 60 Folder 84
Box 60 Folder 85
Box 60 Folder 85
Box 60 Folder 86
Box 60 Folder 86
Box 60 Folder 87
Box 60 Folder 87
Box 60 Folder 88
Box 60 Folder 88
Box 60 Folder 89
Box 60 Folder 89
Box 60 Folder 90
Box 60 Folder 90
Box 60 Folder 91
Box 60 Folder 91
Box 60 Folder 92
Box 60 Folder 92
Box 60 Folder 93
Box 60 Folder 93
Box 60 Folder 94
Box 60 Folder 94
Box 60 Folder 95
Box 60 Folder 95
Box 60 Folder 96
Container ships at ore dock.
Box 60 Folder 96
Box 60 Folder 97
Box 60 Folder 97
Box 60 Folder 98
Box 60 Folder 98
Box 60 Folder 100
Engineer's side of cab. DM&IR RR
Box 60 Folder 100
Box 60 Folder 101
Maintenance of Way worker.
Box 60 Folder 101
Box 60 Folder 102
Box 60 Folder 102
Box 60 Folder 103
DM&IR Unit 123 pulling a caboose with employees riding on the back.
Box 60 Folder 103
Box 60 Folder 104
Box 60 Folder 104
Box 60 Folder 105
Unknown location; tentatively identified as Proctor Yards in Minnesota.
Box 60 Folder 105
Box 60 Folder 106
Box 60 Folder 106
Box 60 Folder 107a
Fuel pumps in background.
Box 60 Folder 107a
Box 60 Folder 107b
Box 60 Folder 107b
Box 60 Folder 108a
Box 60 Folder 108a
Box 60 Folder 108b
Box 60 Folder 108b
Box 60 Folder 109a
Box 60 Folder 109a
Box 60 Folder 109b
Box 60 Folder 109b
Box 60 Folder 110
Box 60 Folder 110
Box 60 Folder 111
Box 60 Folder 111
Box 60 Folder 112
Box 60 Folder 112
Box 60 Folder 113
Box 60 Folder 113
Box 60 Folder 114
Box 60 Folder 114
Box 60 Folder 115
Box 60 Folder 115
Box 63 Folder 168
Box 63 Folder 168
This series consists of photographs of the Great Northern Railway's facilities in Everett and Seattle, Washington. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 23, are referred to by the letter J in testimony, and were taken by V.S. "Bud" Zumwinkle. Mr. Zumwinkle was employed as an engineer in both road and yard service for the Great Northern and was local chairman of Lodge 501 of the BLF&E. The Great Northern Railway was a class I railroad, operating from Saint Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington. The Great Northern's (GN) route was the northernmost transcontinental railroad route in the United States. The photographs in this series depict the GN's facilities in Seattle and Everett, Washington as a well as trackage in downtown Seattle used by the GN and other carriers such as the Milwaukee Road. Also depicted in this series are numerous industries, including the Scott Paper Mill and Washington Iron Works. Included in this series are six photographs of GN locomotives 159 and 220; their inclusion in this series is a tentative identification, and these photographs might have been taken in another location.
Box 53 Folder 121
GN Unit #220. Manufacturer: ALCO Type: RS3
Box 53 Folder 121
Box 53 Folder 122
GN Unit #220. Manufacturer: ALCO Type: RS3
Box 53 Folder 122
Box 53 Folder 123
GN Unit #220. Manufacturer: ALCO Type: RS3
Box 53 Folder 123
Box 53 Folder 124
GN 159 Manufacturer: EMD Type: NW2
Box 53 Folder 124
Box 53 Folder 125
GN 159 Manufacturer: EMD Type: NW2
Box 53 Folder 125
Box 53 Folder 126
GN 159 Manufacturer: EMD Type: NW2
Box 53 Folder 126
Box 53 Folder 127
GN 159 Manufacturer: EMD Type: NW2
Box 53 Folder 127
Box 53 Folder 128
GN 159 Manufacturer: EMD Type: NW2
Box 53 Folder 128
Box 57 Folder 66
East side track, just south of crossover where GN shoves across.
Box 57 Folder 66
Box 59 Folder 2 1960
Taken south of Seattle House Yard, looking directly into downtown Seattle. Track to extreme right is used by Great Northern crews in switching in the yard, and also for set out and pick up of cars being transferred to and from the Interbay Yard. Track shown in the center of the picture is Northern Pacific westbound mainline track, which curves to the right of the picture and runs into King Street Station. Other tracks to the left are Northern Pacific eastbound main line, an Northern Pacific yard tracks. The grade crossing is Holgate Street, extremely busy during certain parts of the day. Track to extreme right (behind white building) is designated as Mud Track and used by GN crews in switching.
Box 59 Folder 2
Box 59 Folder 3 1960
Taken south of Seattle House Yard, looking directly into downtown Seattle. Track to extreme right is used by Great Northern crews in switching in the yard, and also for set out and pick up of cars being transferred to and from the Interbay Yard. Track shown in the center of the picture is Northern Pacific westbound mainline track, which curves to the right of the picture and runs into King Street Station. Other tracks to the left are Northern Pacific eastbound main line, an Northern Pacific yard tracks. The grade crossing is Holgate Street, extremely busy during certain parts of the day. Track to extreme right (behind white building) is designated as Mud Track and used by GN crews in switching.
Box 59 Folder 3
Box 59 Folder 4 1960
Different view of Everett Mill industry siding. Shows the dual track that is entered directly from the north end of the New Yard as shown in J-45. The train car is an open car that is hauling a wood product called chips. The engines can be headed in either direction. The signals are all passed on the left side.
Box 59 Folder 4
Box 59 Folder 5 1960
Tracks underneath the truck are used by NP and Pacific Coast and run to the waterfront (just out of frame to left of photograph). The other tracks, parallel to the Viaduct, run north to south. They are running and switching tracks used by the NP, Pacific Coast, and GN Yard Crews. Engines head in either direction while using the running tracks.
Box 59 Folder 5
Box 59 Folder 6 1960
Tracks underneath the truck are used by NP and Pacific Coast and run to the waterfront (just out of frame to left of photograph). The other tracks, parallel to the Viaduct, run north to south. They are running and switching tracks used by the NP, Pacific Coast, and GN Yard Crews. Engines head in either direction while using the running tracks.
Box 59 Folder 6
Box 59 Folder 7 1960
Taken in the vicinity of King Street Station. To the extreme right is northbound Northern Pacific main line, and the adjacent track is southbound Northern Pacific main line. Tracks to the left are terminal tracks and Seattle house yard tracks. All the tracks are used by Great Northern yard engines heading in either direction. Signals are generally passed on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 7
Box 59 Folder 8 1960
Signals are taken on both right and left side of engine; signals also received on either side of engine when working the other tracks shown in this picture because of the curvature. Tracks are referred to as Seventh Avenue. Great Northern trains must move over Northern Pacific and Milwaukee Road main lines. Engines are generally headed north in this area. Because of the close clearance it is also necessary sometimes to pass signals on the fireman's side. Note also the curvature of the tracks. The street crossing is not readily seen, but is used extensively. There is also a great deal of industrial work that goes on in this area.
Box 59 Folder 8
Box 59 Folder 9 1960
Engine generally headed north in this movement while shoving cars; the curve is on the fireman's side. Shows the track used in moving to the Seventh Avenue switching operation described in the previous photograph (Exhibit J-5). This picture is looking west to the curve from which point the tracks curve to the north. The other crossing in J-5 is approximately two blocks from this location. Engines moving here are generally headed north. This crossing is not protected by flashing light signals or gates, and the view of the crossing is impaired by the adjacent buildings. The engine is headed north and the sharp curve of the track seen in the background is on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 9
Box 59 Folder 10 1960
Shows the track adjacent to the building in Exhibit J-6 and gives some idea of the sharpness of the curve and the close clearance. This is a short sub-track. Only two cars are spotted here at a time. The curve is on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 10
Box 59 Folder 11 1960
Stock yard track is on the extreme left. Switchmen generally give signals on the fireman's side when spotting stock cars. This is a subtrack that spots five cars.
Box 59 Folder 11
Box 59 Folder 12 1960
Shows the tracks located under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. The street seen is Spokane Street. The tracks crossing in the center of the picture are used in common by the Northern Pacific, the Union Pacific, the Milwaukee Railroad, the Pacific Coast and the Great Northern. Note the extensive track curvature, as well as the tracks running along both sides of the the viaduct. Visibility is poor due to the curvature and the concrete pillars supporting the viaduct. All operations are controlled by hand signals. The level junction shown in picture are with the NP tracks.
Box 59 Folder 12
Box 59 Folder 13 1960
Taken in the same general area as Exhibit J-12. To the right of the picture under the viaduct are the crossovers seen in J-12. The tracks on the left are used by the Milwaukee Road and Union Pacific and are now occupied by two Milwaukee Road movements headed toward each other on adjacent tracks. This operation is a 24 hour a day operation. The street crossing in the foreground is Atlantic Street, and is very busy at certain times of the day. Note spotters standing on top of the box cars being shoved by engine in background of photograph.
Box 59 Folder 13
Box 59 Folder 14 1960
Shows in the center background a Great Northern yard engine on a curve over the Milwaukee and Union Pacific main lines en route to the Fourth and Fifth Avenue switching gears. The street crossing the foreground is Spokane Street, which is heavily traveled in the mornings and late afternoons. The railroad tracks run north to south. Note that in the left-center portion of the photograph there is another industry switching operation which has a very close clearance. Switchmen are not permitted to work on the top of cars in this area on account of electric trolley wires overhead.
Box 59 Folder 14
Box 59 Folder 15 1960
Used by several railroads, an NP engine is in the foreground (out of frame). Shows yard tracks located under and adjacent to the Alaskan Way Viaduct. These tracks are on the right-hand side of the viaduct. Crossovers can be seen in the left-center of the picture and near the center of the picture. Thick pillars obstruct the vision of the firemen or enginemen in this area.
Box 59 Folder 15
Box 59 Folder 16 1960
Engines are generally headed north; cars are shoved in either one or both directions over street crossing shown in foreground. Fifth Avenue switching job in the Fifth Avenue area. Shows some of the industries serviced on this Fifth Avenue job. There is a track proceeding over the crossing. The view of the busy crossing is impaired by the building itself. Also note the sign that reads "Danger, Not Sufficient Clearance." Signals must be passed frequently on the fireman's side while serving the industries. One of the serviced industries is Stack Steel.
Box 59 Folder 16
Box 59 Folder 17 1960
Servicing and spotting requires constant lookout on both sides of engines due to close clearances, street crossings, parked automobiles and vehicular traffic. Engines are generally headed north. Shows the south end of Occidental Avenue in downtown Seattle. The picture is taken facing north. Cars are always shoved behind the engine when serving industries. Most spotting is done along this one track. This track services roughly 25 to 30 different industries.
Box 59 Folder 17
Box 59 Folder 18 1960
NP crossover leading off Occidental Avenue to NP Yard.
Box 59 Folder 18
Box 59 Folder 19 1960
Taken on Occidental Avenue. Note the automobiles and trucks parked on the track directly behind the train car. Because of the heavy automobile and truck traffic here, it is important to maintain a lookout at all times on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 59 Folder 19
Box 59 Folder 20 1960
Taken in the downtown industrial area on Occidental Avenue. There is a considerable amount of truck traffic here and the engine crew must keep a lookout for moving traffic. Generally work is done at times before the parked cars appear. Switchman is unable to pass signals on the left side of the box car.
Box 59 Folder 20
Box 59 Folder 21 1960
Note condition of rails, debris scattered around, close clearances, all of which require constant lookout.
Box 59 Folder 21
Box 59 Folder 22 1960
Another location along Occidental Avenue. This photo gives an idea of the spotting that is done in the buildings that re located on the right of the picture. Notice the parked cars, lumber, and other debris along the tracks. There is extremely close clearance between the tracks and the building for the spotting of the boxcars. There is a "No Parking" sign, but automobile drivers do not pay much attention to these signs.
Box 59 Folder 22
Box 59 Folder 23 1960
Shows the Washington Iron Works. There are four or five industries that are only accessible by going through the Washington Iron Works Building. Notice the curvature of the track as it goes through the building, as well as the presence of employees of the Iron Works in and about the tracks. Note the signals on the fireman's side. In the foreground of the picture there is a street crossing that is in the downtown Seattle area, and it has heavy traffic at all times.
Box 59 Folder 23
Box 59 Folder 24 1960
Shows the track leading into the Washington Iron Works. Note the sharp curve near the center of the picture. The truck on the left-hand corner of the photograph is parked on the track directly in front of the Washington Iron Works Building. The view of the crossing is almost completely obstructed by buildings on both sides, and the crossing is protected only by a cross-sign without flashing lights, gates, or bells. The crossing is entirely governed by signals; the engineers are unable to see the crossing. Service is done sometimes on the fireman's side and sometimes on the engineer's side.
Box 59 Folder 24
Box 59 Folder 25 1960
Shows the gate to the Washington Iron Works in a closed position. Proceeding through this area, a lookout must be maintained by all members of the crew because of the iron works employees and the cars parked in the area because of the close clearances which are noted by the sign on the picture "Restricted Side Clearance." There are many instances of close clearance throughout.
Box 59 Folder 25
Box 59 Folder 26 1960
Shows some of the industry that is served on the other side of the Washington Iron Works building. This is north from area shown in Exhibit J-25. In the extreme background in the center of the picture is a plasterboard car which has been spotted for unloading. The plasterboard car is shoved over street crossing for spotting signals given on either side, generally on left side in spotting car or cars at this location. That is the end of the track. There are three industries located in that immediate vicinity and the spots are all very close. To reach that point, it is necessary to cross another street crossing that is just this side of that car. There are close clearances that can be observed in relation to the box car in the center of the picture. Switching signals are generally passed here on the left. The tracks curving off to the right lead into different areas of the Washington Iron Works.
Box 59 Folder 26
Box 59 Folder 27 1960
Shows the Washington Iron Works from the other side of the gate shown in Exhibit J-24. The engine is generally headed north in this curvature around to the left and signals are passed on the fireman's side. Because of the number of employees in the iron works it is necessary to maintain a lookout on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 59 Folder 27
Box 59 Folder 28 1960
Taken in downtown Seattle area. The track to the extreme right is used by Great Northern in servicing the Seattle Plumbing Supply Company and five or six other industries in the area. The center track, which curves to the left, is the Great Northern's track running to the waterfront and also serves other industries along the way. Since the same engine will service industries on both tracks, you are bound to have one of the tracks curving on the fireman's side regardless of which way the engine may be headed. This is a 24/7 operation.
Box 59 Folder 28
Box 59 Folder 29 1960
Shows a portion of the north end of the Interbay Yard and its roundhouse, storage tracks, and main line track. There is a single main line through this area, indicated by the block signal. That is the one main line track. The main line curves to the left rather than to the right. Therefore, it is essential to have a fireman serving as a lookout on the left-hand side of the cab. Work in this yard is seven days per week.
Box 59 Folder 29
Box 59 Folder 30 1960
Shows the north end of the Interbay Yard. To the right of the picture is the roundhouse and the main line. All the tracks in this area, excepting the rip (repair-in-place) tracks, have the same marked degree of curvature. The rip tracks are in the extreme upper left-hand portion of the picture and are comparatively straight. The curvatures of the tracks again make it necessary for firemen to maintain a lookout from their side of the cab. The engines that work the lead in the north end of the yard are headed south, so the signals are mostly passed on the engineer's side because the curve is on his side. The extreme right track goes into three Western Food Express tracks, and curves in both directions, so the signals are given on either side of the locomotive. Also, the old main line and Government Tracks Nos. 1, 2, and 3 are also in this area and curve in both directions.
Box 59 Folder 30
Box 59 Folder 31 1960
Taken at the south end of the Interbay Yard about one mile south of the preceding exhibits (J-34). The north end is visible in the distance. The smokestack and warehouse buildings, including the roundhouse, are in that area. The curvature of the tracks running off from the lead track is clearly shown here. All of the curvatures from these leads are on the left side of the locomotive and signals are sometimes passed on the fireman's side in this area. They are passed here again generally on the engineer's side whenever possible. The engines are headed south in this area and we are looking from south to north. There are typically two (sometimes three or four) crews working in this area.
Box 59 Folder 31
Box 59 Folder 32 1960
Looking north, showing curvature of track, and crossover between No. 12 and No. 13 tracks.
Box 59 Folder 32
Box 59 Folder 33 1960
Photograph taken from Dravus Street Bridge.
Box 59 Folder 33
Box 59 Folder 34 1960
Taken from the Dravus Bridge, which is located midway between the north and south end of the yard. On the extreme left are the tracks of the Northern Pacific with whom we interchange cars at that point. The first track running off the bottom of the left portion of the picture is the Great Northern main line. There is a crossover between A track and B track. One crossover leads form A to the main line, and another (not shown) leads from B to A. A lookout must be maintained here at all times from both sides of the cab for yard crews which number from 1 to 5, depending on the time of day, and road crews that move in and out of here. Note also the men walking along the tracks in the extreme left portion of the picture. Those are Northern Pacific Tracks. Twenty to twenty-four trains may run through here in a 24 hour period.
Box 59 Folder 34
Box 59 Folder 35 1960
Note tracks curve sharply to the left coming onto the lead, which makes the curve to the fireman's side, engines are headed south (photograph taken facing north). Taken in the same area as J-37. Three members of the ground crew are spread out along the track on the engineer's side. The man at the far left standing with one foot on the switch has just given a signal. The switch foreman in the center is also throwing a switch. The man at the far right is riding on a car, and is probably going to couple in or make the joint of the car, or he may be riding that car for the purpose of pulling pins. Notice also in the center of the picture just to the left is the last car which has been cut off.
Box 59 Folder 35
Box 59 Folder 36 1960
Shows some of the tracks and curvature under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Note the tracks on the left which are directly underneath, with automobiles parked parallel to them. In the right center of the picture is a box car spotted inside the Seattle Hardware Company. Note the extremely close clearances on both sides of this car. There is a great amount of vehicular traffic, track curvatures, and close clearances here, which make it imperative to maintain a lookout at all times.
Box 59 Folder 36
Box 59 Folder 37 1960
Shows the extreme end of the Interbay Yard of what is commonly known as the G-yard. The tracks to the left of the wire fence on the left part of the picture belong to the government, and lead to Navy Pier No.91. The government tracks in the upper left hand portion are curved in both directions, and have several crossovers. Clearances there are close and a lookout must be maintained. The government possess their own small locomotive for their use. Great Northern is the only railroad that makes deliveries to this government-owned railroad installation. The tracks to the right in the yard also have marked curves and a lookout must be maintained at all times. Engines are usually headed south and signals are usually passed on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 37
Box 59 Folder 38 1960
Shows the cross-over from the Great Northern main tracks. It shows the crossover between the two main lines, the Union Pacific-Milwaukee Road main lines and the Great Northern. This is the Great Northern main line trackage. It is necessary to use these main lines in order to service industries in the area, on both sides of the track. The crossing here is at Seventh Avenue. Industries are served on both sides of the track, so at least half of the time, signals must be passed on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 38
Box 59 Folder 39 1960
Another view of the cross-over from the Great Northern main tracks. It shows the crossover between the two main lines, the Union Pacific-Milwaukee Road main lines and the Great Northern. This is the Great Northern main line trackage. It is necessary to use these main lines in order to service industries in the area, on both sides of the track. The crossing here is at Seventh Avenue. Industries are served on both sides of the track, so at least half of the time, signals must be passed on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 39
Box 59 Folder 40 1960
Another view of the cross-over from the Great Northern main tracks. It shows the crossover between the two main lines, the Union Pacific-Milwaukee Road main lines and the Great Northern. This is the Great Northern main line trackage. It is necessary to use these main lines in order to service industries in the area, on both sides of the track. The crossing here is at Seventh Avenue. Industries are served on both sides of the track, so at least half of the time, signals must be passed on the fireman's side.
Box 59 Folder 40
Box 59 Folder 41 1960
This picture shows tracks under the viaduct that are in common use by the Union Pacific, Great Northern, Northern Pacific, and the former Pacific Coast Railroad. This track extends about three miles directly under this viaduct or along this highway area. The number of parked cars and trucks shown here gives some indication of the amount of vehicular traffic in this area. The Puget Sound would be to the left of the picture. The picture is very close to the water. Operated 24 hours a day.
Box 59 Folder 41
Box 59 Folder 42 1960
This picture shows the extensive trackage under and adjacent to the Alaskan Way Viaduct at Atlantic Street. The white lines in the foreground are a pedestrian crosswalk. Since tracks curve here to the right and to the left, and with the pedestrian crosswalk, it is obviously necessary to maintain a lookout from both sides of the locomotive. You can see the tracks crossing the extreme right there. Generally, the standard switch type locomotives are used in this area.
Box 59 Folder 42
Box 59 Folder 43 1960
Taken in the same general area as Exhibit J-31B. It shows another view of the Atlantic Street crossing. In the center is the Union Pacific cross-over that is protected. The lower left-hand corner of the picture shows the common-user railroad track. This picture does not show the description well. That is the Union Pacific interchange. The common-user track is used by Union Pacific, Great Northern, and the Milwaukee. Note in the center and background the extreme track curvature as it approaches Atlantic Street, and also there are some figure S curves. Around these, the engineer and fireman must both keep a lookout.
Box 59 Folder 43
Box 59 Folder 44 1960
This is a picture taken along the east side of the viaduct just north of Atlantic Street. The left is a long freight train moving across Atlantic Street and curving around in the center background. Also note from this track running north and south, the open switch points and the crossover. Here we have heavily raveled streets again. This is an industrial area of Seattle. City buses use these streets, as indicated by bus zone just to the right of the Atlantic Street sign on the right-hand portion of the picture. The track will lead to the industrial track shown here in the center of the picture which cuts across both of these tracks and runs into the industry plant shown on the right-hand side of the picture. Somewhere industry leads cut across the streets at points further north along Atlantic Street. These crossing are all unprotected by flashing lights, bells, or gates. Lookouts are required on both sides of the cab at all times. Important to note, though, is that there is a crossing watchman at Atlantic Street flagging the movement of engines through there, and also protecting the vehicle traffic.
Box 59 Folder 44
Box 59 Folder 45 1960
This is a picture taken along the east side of the viaduct just north of Atlantic Street. The left is a long freight train moving across Atlantic Street and curving around in the center background. Also note from this track running north and south, the open switch points and the crossover. Here we have heavily raveled streets again. This is an industrial area of Seattle. City buses use these streets, as indicated by bus zone just to the right of the Atlantic Street sign on the right-hand portion of the picture. The track will lead to the industrial track shown here in the center of the picture which cuts across both of these tracks and runs into the industry plant shown on the right-hand side of the picture. Somewhere industry leads cut across the streets at points further north along Atlantic Street. These crossing are all unprotected by flashing lights, bells, or gates. Lookouts are required on both sides of the cab at all times. Important to note, though, is that there is a crossing watchman at Atlantic Street flagging the movement of engines through there, and also protecting the vehicle traffic.
Box 59 Folder 45
Box 59 Folder 46 1960
This is a picture taken along the east side of the viaduct just north of Atlantic Street. The left is a long freight train moving across Atlantic Street and curving around in the center background. Also note from this track running north and south, the open switch points and the crossover. Here we have heavily raveled streets again. This is an industrial area of Seattle. City buses use these streets, as indicated by bus zone just to the right of the Atlantic Street sign on the right-hand portion of the picture. The track will lead to the industrial track shown here in the center of the picture which cuts across both of these tracks and runs into the industry plant shown on the right-hand side of the picture. Somewhere industry leads cut across the streets at points further north along Atlantic Street. These crossing are all unprotected by flashing lights, bells, or gates. Lookouts are required on both sides of the cab at all times. Important to note, though, is that there is a crossing watchman at Atlantic Street flagging the movement of engines through there, and also protecting the vehicle traffic.
Box 59 Folder 46
Box 59 Folder 47 1960
Looking south toward the Seattle house yard and toward the Northern Pacific main line. The Seattle house yard is off to the left and not shown. To the right is Occidental Avenue. The track in the center of the picture curving over to the right is the spur leading off to Occidental Avenue. Notice the number of cars parked immediately adjacent to the tracks. Also notice the close clearance between the cars and the track.
Box 59 Folder 47
Box 59 Folder 48 1960
Taken at Argo, located approximately four miles south of the Seattle House Yard and nine or ten miles south of Interbay Yard. All of the tracks are main lines of the Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Milwaukee Road, and Pacific Coast Railroad. Freight and passenger trains, as well as yard engines of the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern, move over these tracks. This is one of the busiest locations in the Seattle area.
Box 59 Folder 48
Box 59 Folder 49 1960
NP track used occasionally by GN; curve to the left on fireman's side. Sears Tower (now Starbucks Corporate Headquarters) in background.
Box 59 Folder 49
Box 59 Folder 50 1960
Signals are taken on both right and left side of engine; signals also received on either side of engine when working the other tracks shown in this picture because of the curvature. Tracks are referred to as Seventh Avenue. Great Northern trains must move over Northern Pacific and Milwaukee Road main lines. Engines are generally headed north in this area. Because of the close clearance it is also necessary sometimes to pass signals on the fireman's side. Note also the curvature of the tracks. The street crossing is not readily seen, but is used extensively. There is also a great deal of industrial work that goes on in this area.
Box 59 Folder 50
Box 59 Folder 51 1960
Shows the approach to the stockyard track and indicates close clearance and the obstruction to vision caused by stockyard pens. Switchmen will try to stay on the platform, which eliminates having to get in between where clearance is close.
Box 59 Folder 51
Box 59 Folder 52 1960
Main line to the left.
Box 59 Folder 52
Box 59 Folder 53 1960
The main line is on the extreme left and is not shown in the picture. This track leads to the north end of the new yard from this particular industry, the Robinson Mill.
Box 59 Folder 53
Box 59 Folder 54 1960
Different view of Everett Mill industry siding. Shows the dual track that is entered directly from the north end of the New Yard as shown in J-45. The train car is an open car that is hauling a wood product called chips. The engines can be headed in either direction. The signals are all passed on the left side.
Box 59 Folder 54
Box 59 Folder 55 1960
View of grade crossing, along side tank and freight cars next to yard office.
Box 59 Folder 55
Box 59 Folder 56 1960
Shows the Great Northern southbound main line. The extreme curvature of the track to the left is on the fireman's side. The track running off to the right leads to the Everett Ice Company and is served by the Great Northern. Note in the center of the crossovers and other industry leads. These curves and crossovers, as well as frequent train movements and vehicular traffic, make it necessary to keep a lookout on both sides of the cab at all times.
Box 59 Folder 56
Box 59 Folder 57 1960
Shows the Great Northern's tracks outside of and adjacent to the Scott Paper Company, which is shown to the right. Note the number of curved tracks and crossovers in the center of the picture. The industry is served by the Great Northern every four hours, 24 hours a day, seven days per week.
Box 59 Folder 57
Box 59 Folder 58 1960
Taken at the south end of the Bayside Yard, toward the water front. Industrial employees are moving some freight cars. Because of the curvature of the track throughout the area, and the grade crossing, one of which may be seen on the left center of the picture, the fireman must also maintain a lookout from his side of the cab.
Box 59 Folder 58
Box 59 Folder 59 1960
Shows the track leading into Robinson Mill. Note the crossover and curvature on the track.
Box 59 Folder 59
Box 59 Folder 60 1960
Shows cars being loaded inside Robinson Mill, and indicates the close clearance involved here. Depending on which way the engine is headed (they will be headed in either direction), the fireman may have to take signals on his side. Lookout is required on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 59 Folder 60
Box 59 Folder 93 1960
Taken within the confines of the Scott Paper Company works.
Box 59 Folder 93
Box 59 Folder 94 1960
Taken at the south end of the Bayside Yard, toward the water front. Industrial employees are moving some freight cars. Because of the curvature of the track throughout the area, and the grade crossing, one of which may be seen on the left center of the picture, the fireman must also maintain a lookout from his side of the cab.
Box 59 Folder 94
Box 59 Folder 95 1960
Taken within the confines of the Scott Paper Company works.
Box 59 Folder 95
Box 59 Folder 96 1960
Taken within the confines of the Scott Paper Company works.
Box 59 Folder 96
Box 59 Folder 131 1960
Shows the north end of the Interbay Yard. To the right of the picture is the roundhouse and the main line. All the tracks in this area, excepting the rip (repair) tracks, have the same marked degree of curvature. The rip tracks are in the extreme upper left-hand portion of the picture and are comparatively straight. The curvatures of the tracks again make it necessary for firemen to maintain a lookout from their side of the cab. The engines that work the lead in the north end of the yard are headed south, so the signals are mostly passed on the engineer's side because the curve is on his side. The extreme right track goes into three Western Food Express tracks, and curves in both directions, so the signals are given on either side of the locomotive. Also, the old main line and Government Tracks Nos. 1, 2, and 3 are also in this area and curve in both directions. (This is a zoomed out print of the negatived used to print the other J-34, internal number #27.)
Box 59 Folder 131
Box 60 Folder 36 1960
Note tracks curve sharply to the left coming onto the lead, which makes the curve to the fireman's side, engines are headed south (photograph taken facing north). Taken in the same area as J-37. Three members of the ground crew are spread out along the track on the engineer's side. The man at the far left standing with one foot on the switch has just given a signal. The switch foreman in the center is also throwing a switch. The man at the far right is riding on a car, and is probably going to couple in or make the joint of the car, or he may be riding that car for the purpose of pulling pins. Notice also in the center of the picture just to the left is the last car which has been cut off.
Box 60 Folder 36
Box 63 Folder 12 1960
The main line is on the extreme left and is not shown in the picture. This track leads to the north end of the new yard from this particular industry, the Robinson Mill.
Box 63 Folder 12
Box 63 Folder 13 1960
The main line is on the extreme left and is not shown in the picture. This track leads to the north end of the new yard from this particular industry, the Robinson Mill. (Slightly different angle of location seen in Exhibit J-45).
Box 63 Folder 13
Box 63 Folder 14 1960
Tank cars and freight cars alongside grade crossing and new Yard Office. Track crossing street to log dump.
Box 63 Folder 14
Box 63 Folder 15 1960
Ground View of railroad tracks and GN Unit #161. Manufacturer: EMD Model: NW2 (like J-44). East side of Yard Office, main line to left of yard engine.
Box 63 Folder 15
Box 63 Folder 16 1960
Ground View of railroad tracks and GN Unit #161. Manufacturer: EMD Model: NW2 (like J-44). East side of Yard Office, main line to left of yard engine.
Box 63 Folder 16
Box 63 Folder 17 1960
Ground View of railroad tracks and GN Unit #161. Manufacturer: EMD Model: NW2 (like J-44). East side of Yard Office, main line to left of yard engine.
Box 63 Folder 17
Box 63 Folder 18 1960
Signals are taken on both right and left side of engine; signals also received on either side of engine when working the other tracks shown in this picture because of the curvature. Tracks are referred to as Seventh Avenue. Great Northern trains must move over Northern Pacific and Milwaukee Road main lines. Engines are generally headed north in this area. Because of the close clearance it is also necessary sometimes to pass signals on the fireman's side. Note also the curvature of the tracks. The street crossing is not readily seen, but is used extensively. There is also a great deal of industrial work that goes on in this area.
Box 63 Folder 18
Box 63 Folder 19 1960
Northbound extra freight, Seattle to Everett; taken at Golden Gardens.
Box 63 Folder 19
Box 63 Folder 20 1960
Northbound extra freight, Seattle to Everett; taken at Golden Gardens.
Box 63 Folder 20
Box 63 Folder 21 1960
Looking south from fire station toward Yard Office; main line to left. (Like Exhibit J-44, but facing other direction on tracks)
Box 63 Folder 21
Box 63 Folder 22 1960
Industry track that goes to Robinson Mill.
Box 63 Folder 22
Box 63 Folder 23 1960
Lower view of grade crossing (seen in Exhibit J-46) along side tank and freight cars next to yard office.
Box 63 Folder 23
Box 63 Folder 24 1960
Box 63 Folder 24
Box 63 Folder 25 1960
Shows the Great Northern's tracks outside of and adjacent to the Scott Paper Company, which is shown to the right. Note the number of curved tracks and crossovers in the center of the picture. The industry is served by the Great Northern every four hours, 24 hours a day, seven days per week.
Box 63 Folder 25
Box 63 Folder 26 1960
The Milwaukee Road Locomotive Unit #621 headed north. Taken in the same general area as Exhibits J-12 and J-13. To the right of the picture under the viaduct are the crossovers seen in J-12. The tracks on the left are used by the Milwaukee Road and Union Pacific and are now occupied by two Milwaukee Road movements headed toward each other on adjacent tracks. This operation is a 24 hour a day operation. The street crossing in the foreground is Atlantic Street, and is very busy at certain times of the day. Note spotters standing on top of the box cars being shoved by engine in background of photograph.
Box 63 Folder 26
Box 63 Folder 27 1960
The Milwaukee Road Locomotive Unit #621 headed north. Taken in the same general area as Exhibits J-12 and J-13. To the right of the picture under the viaduct are the crossovers seen in J-12. The tracks on the left are used by the Milwaukee Road and Union Pacific and are now occupied by two Milwaukee Road movements headed toward each other on adjacent tracks. This operation is a 24 hour a day operation. The street crossing in the foreground is Atlantic Street, and is very busy at certain times of the day. Note spotters standing on top of the box cars being shoved by engine in background of photograph.
Box 63 Folder 27
Box 63 Folder 28 1960
Taken at the south end of the Bayside Yard, toward the water front. Industrial employees are moving some freight cars. Because of the curvature of the track throughout the area, and the grade crossing, one of which may be seen on the left center of the picture, the fireman must also maintain a lookout from his side of the cab.
Box 63 Folder 28
Box 63 Folder 29 1960
Shows the Great Northern's tracks outside of and adjacent to the Scott Paper Company, which is shown to the right. Note the number of curved tracks and crossovers in the center of the picture. The industry is served by the Great Northern every four hours, 24 hours a day, seven days per week.
Box 63 Folder 29
Box 63 Folder 30 1960
Shows the Great Northern's tracks outside of and adjacent to the Scott Paper Company, which is shown to the right. Note the number of curved tracks and crossovers in the center of the picture. The industry is served by the Great Northern every four hours, 24 hours a day, seven days per week.
Box 63 Folder 30
Box 63 Folder 31 1960
Manufacturer: EMD Model: F3A. Southbound passenger train: Vancouver, B.C. to Seattle. Location of photograph is just north of the Everett Depot.
Box 63 Folder 31
Box 63 Folder 32 1960
Track crossing and running to left of picture into chipboard plant, Robinson Mill.
Box 63 Folder 32
Box 63 Folder 33 1960
Track crossing and running to left of picture into chipboard plant, Robinson Mill.
Box 63 Folder 33
Box 63 Folder 34 1960
Shows the track leading into Robinson Mill. Note the crossover and curvature on the track.
Box 63 Folder 34
Box 63 Folder 35 1960
Freight car on track next to platform.
Box 63 Folder 35
Box 63 Folder 36 1960
"S" Curve. Engine generally headed north in this movement while shoving cars; the curve is on the fireman's side. Shows the track used in moving to the Seventh Avenue switching operation described in the previous photograph (Exhibit J-5). This picture is looking west to the curve from which point the tracks curve to the north. The other crossing in J-5 is approximately two blocks from this location. Engines moving here are generally headed north. This crossing is not protected by flashing light signals or gates, and the view of the crossing is impaired by the adjacent buildings. The engine is headed north and the sharp curve of the track seen in the background is on the fireman's side.
Box 63 Folder 36
Box 63 Folder 37 1960
Shows the track leading into Robinson Mill. Note the crossover and curvature on the track.
Box 63 Folder 37
Box 63 Folder 38 1960
Main line to left, runs north and south along Bayside Yard.
Box 63 Folder 38
Box 63 Folder 39 1960
Shows the Washington Iron Works. There are four or five industries that are only accessible by going through the Washington Iron Works Building. Notice the curvature of the track as it goes through the building, as well as the presence of employees of the Iron Works in and about the tracks. Note the signals on the fireman's side. In the foreground of the picture there is a street crossing that is in the downtown Seattle area, and it has heavy traffic at all times.
Box 63 Folder 39
Box 63 Folder 40 1960
Engines are generally headed north; cars are shoved in either one or both directions. Signals must be passed frequently on the fireman's side while serving the industries. One of the serviced industries is Stack Steel.
Box 63 Folder 40
Box 63 Folder 41 1960
Taken in downtown Seattle area. The track to the extreme right is used by Great Northern in servicing the Seattle Plumbing Supply Company and five or six other industries in the area. The center track, which curves to the left, is the Great Northern's track running to the waterfront and also serves other industries along the way. Since the same engine will service industries on both tracks, you are bound to have one of the tracks curving on the fireman's side regardless of which way the engine may be headed. This is a 24/7 operation.
Box 63 Folder 41
Box 63 Folder 42 1960
GN Engine 278-A (EMD FA2 A&B Unit) northbound on main line. Photograph taken from Dravus Street Bridge facing south.
Box 63 Folder 42
Box 63 Folder 43 1960
Shows the north end of the Interbay Yard. To the right of the picture is the roundhouse and the main line. All the tracks in this area, excepting the rip (repair) tracks, have the same marked degree of curvature. The rip tracks are in the extreme upper left-hand portion of the picture and are comparatively straight. The curvatures of the tracks again make it necessary for firemen to maintain a lookout from their side of the cab. The engines that work the lead in the north end of the yard are headed south, so the signals are mostly passed on the engineer's side because the curve is on his side. The extreme right track goes into three Western Food Express tracks, and curves in both directions, so the signals are given on either side of the locomotive. Also, the old main line and Government Tracks Nos. 1, 2, and 3 are also in this area and curve in both directions. (This is a zoomed out print of the negatived used to print the other J-34, internal number #27.)
Box 63 Folder 43
Box 63 Folder 44 1960
Note tracks curve sharply to the left coming onto the lead, which makes the curve to the fireman's side, engines are headed south (photograph taken facing north). Taken in the same area as J-37. Three members of the ground crew are spread out along the track on the engineer's side. The man at the far left standing with one foot on the switch has just given a signal. The switch foreman in the center is also throwing a switch. The man at the far right is riding on a car, and is probably going to couple in or make the joint of the car, or he may be riding that car for the purpose of pulling pins. Notice also in the center of the picture just to the left is the last car which has been cut off.
Box 63 Folder 44
Box 63 Folder 45 1960
Note tracks curve sharply to the left coming onto the lead, which makes the curve to the fireman's side, engines are headed south (photograph taken facing north). Taken in the same area as J-37. Three members of the ground crew are spread out along the track on the engineer's side. The man at the far left standing with one foot on the switch has just given a signal. The switch foreman in the center is also throwing a switch. The man at the far right is riding on a car, and is probably going to couple in or make the joint of the car, or he may be riding that car for the purpose of pulling pins. Notice also in the center of the picture just to the left is the last car which has been cut off.
Box 63 Folder 45
Box 63 Folder 46 1960
Taken at the south end of the Interbay Yard about one mile south of the preceding exhibits (J-34). The north end is visible in the distance. The smokestack and warehouse buildings, including the roundhouse, are in that area. The curvature of the tracks running off from the lead track is clearly shown here. All of the curvatures from these leads are on the left side of the locomotive and signals are sometimes passed on the fireman's side in this area. They are passed here again generally on the engineer's side whenever possible. The engines are headed south in this area and we are looking from south to north. There are typically two (sometimes three or four) crews working in this area.
Box 63 Folder 46
Box 63 Folder 47 1960
Shows some of the tracks and curvature under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Note the tracks on the left which are directly underneath, with automobiles parked parallel to them. In the right center of the picture is a box car spotted inside the Seattle Hardware Company. Note the extremely close clearances on both sides of this car. There is a great amount of vehicular traffic, track curvatures, and close clearances here, which make it imperative to maintain a lookout at all times.
Box 63 Folder 47
Box 63 Folder 48 1960
Shows some of the tracks and curvature under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Note the tracks on the left which are directly underneath, with automobiles parked parallel to them.
Box 63 Folder 48
Box 63 Folder 49 1960
Shows some of the tracks and curvature under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Note the tracks on the left which are directly underneath, with automobiles parked parallel to them. In the right center of the picture is a box car spotted inside the Seattle Hardware Company. Note the extremely close clearances on both sides of this car. There is a great amount of vehicular traffic, track curvatures, and close clearances here, which make it imperative to maintain a lookout at all times.
Box 63 Folder 49
Box 63 Folder 50 1960
N.P., G.N, & P.C. (Pacific Coast RR) all use, Atlantic St. in the foreground, considerable traffic, also note Rail Road crossings, crossovers & curvature. (like J-12, J-30)
Box 63 Folder 50
Box 63 Folder 51 1960
Shows some of the tracks and curvature under the Alaskan Way Viaduct. Note the tracks on the left which are directly underneath, with automobiles parked parallel to them. In the right center of the picture is a box car spotted inside the Seattle Hardware Company. Note the extremely close clearances on both sides of this car. There is a great amount of vehicular traffic, track curvatures, and close clearances here, which make it imperative to maintain a lookout at all times.
Box 63 Folder 51
Box 63 Folder 52 1960
Same crossing shown in Exhibits J-20A and J-20B. Tracks running right to left are used by NP and Pacific Coast and run to the waterfront (just out of frame to left of photograph). The other tracks, parallel to the Viaduct, run north to south. They are running and switching tracks used by the NP, Pacific Coast, and GN Yard Crews. Engines head in either direction while using the running tracks.
Box 63 Folder 52
Box 63 Folder 53 1960
Same crossing shown in Exhibits J-20A and J-20B. Tracks running right to left are used by NP and Pacific Coast and run to the waterfront (just out of frame to left of photograph). The other tracks, parallel to the Viaduct, run north to south. They are running and switching tracks used by the NP, Pacific Coast, and GN Yard Crews. Engines head in either direction while using the running tracks.
Box 63 Folder 53
Box 63 Folder 54 1960
Manufacturer: EMD Model: SW 1200. Facing opposite direction from Exhibit J-30 at the intersection of the Alaskan Way Viaduct and Atlantic Street.
Box 63 Folder 54
Box 63 Folder 55 1960
Freight car on railroad tracks on west side of viaduct. Taken in the same general area as Exhibits J-12 and J-13.
Box 63 Folder 55
Box 63 Folder 56 1960
Freight car on railroad tracks on west side of viaduct. Taken in the same general area as Exhibits J-12 and J-13.
Box 63 Folder 56
Box 63 Folder 57 1960
This is a picture taken along the east side of the viaduct just north of Atlantic Street. The left is a long freight train moving across Atlantic Street and curving around in the center background. Also note from this track running north and south, the open switch points and the crossover. Here we have heavily raveled streets again. This is an industrial area of Seattle. City buses use these streets, as indicated by bus zone just to the right of the Atlantic Street sign on the right-hand portion of the picture. The track will lead to the industrial track shown here in the center of the picture which cuts across both of these tracks and runs into the industry plant shown on the right-hand side of the picture. Somewhere industry leads cut across the streets at points further north along Atlantic Street. These crossing are all unprotected by flashing lights, bells, or gates. Lookouts are required on both sides of the cab at all times. Important to note, though, is that there is a crossing watchman at Atlantic Street flagging the movement of engines through there, and also protecting the vehicle traffic.
Box 63 Folder 57
Box 63 Folder 58 1960
This is a picture taken along the east side of the viaduct just north of Atlantic Street. The left is a long freight train moving across Atlantic Street and curving around in the center background. Also note from this track running north and south, the open switch points and the crossover. Here we have heavily raveled streets again. This is an industrial area of Seattle. City buses use these streets, as indicated by bus zone just to the right of the Atlantic Street sign on the right-hand portion of the picture. The track will lead to the industrial track shown here in the center of the picture which cuts across both of these tracks and runs into the industry plant shown on the right-hand side of the picture. Somewhere industry leads cut across the streets at points further north along Atlantic Street. These crossing are all unprotected by flashing lights, bells, or gates. Lookouts are required on both sides of the cab at all times. Important to note, though, is that there is a crossing watchman at Atlantic Street flagging the movement of engines through there, and also protecting the vehicle traffic.
Box 63 Folder 58
Box 63 Folder 59 1960
This picture shows the extensive trackage under and adjacent to the Alaskan Way Viaduct at Atlantic Street. Facing opposite direction from Exhibit J-30 at the intersection of the Alaskan Way Viaduct and Atlantic Street.
Box 63 Folder 59
Box 63 Folder 60 1960
Great Northern Locomotive Unit #119. King Street Passenger Station clock tower in background.
Box 63 Folder 60
Box 63 Folder 61 1960
Box 63 Folder 61
Box 63 Folder 62 1960
Taken at Argo, located approximately four miles south of the Seattle House Yard and nine or ten miles south of Interbay Yard. All of the tracks are main lines of the Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Milwaukee Road, and Pacific Coast Railroad. Freight and passenger trains, as well as yard engines of the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern, move over these tracks. This is one of the busiest locations in the Seattle area.
Box 63 Folder 62
Box 63 Folder 63 1960
Taken at Argo, located approximately four miles south of the Seattle House Yard and nine or ten miles south of Interbay Yard. All of the tracks are main lines of the Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Milwaukee Road, and Pacific Coast Railroad. Freight and passenger trains, as well as yard engines of the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern, move over these tracks. This is one of the busiest locations in the Seattle area.
Box 63 Folder 63
Box 63 Folder 64 1960
Taken at Argo, located approximately four miles south of the Seattle House Yard and nine or ten miles south of Interbay Yard. All of the tracks are main lines of the Northern Pacific, Union Pacific, Milwaukee Road, and Pacific Coast Railroad. Freight and passenger trains, as well as yard engines of the Union Pacific, Northern Pacific, and Great Northern, move over these tracks. This is one of the busiest locations in the Seattle area.
Box 63 Folder 64
Box 63 Folder 65 1960
Photograph taken from Dravus Street Bridge facing south. NP main line to right
Box 63 Folder 65
Box 63 Folder 66 1960
East side track, just south of crossover where GN shoves across.
Box 63 Folder 66
Box 63 Folder 114 1960
King Street Passenger Station clock tower in background.
Box 63 Folder 114
This series consists of photographs of the Great Northern Railway's facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 19, are referred to by the letter L in testimony, and were taken by Arnold M. Strommen. Mr. Strommen was employed as a locomotive engineer for the Great Northern in the Willmar, Minnesota Seniority District and was local chairman of Lodge 95 of the BLF&E. These photographs were taken on October 31, 1960, when Mr. Strommen worked on through freight service between Willmar and Minneapolis, Minnesota. The Great Northern Railway was a class I railroad, operating from Saint Paul, Minnesota, to Seattle, Washington. The Great Northern's (GN) route was the northernmost transcontinental railroad route in the United States. The photographs in this series depict the GN's facilities in Minnesota, including the union yards at Minneapolis Junction and the industries served by the GN, including various grain elevators.
Box 53 Folder 190 1960
Shows how the tracks converge at this junction. The cut of cars being pulled to the east (on the right side of the photograph) are being pulled out of the main line of the GNRR. The GNRR mainline tracks are those in the middle.
Box 53 Folder 190
Box 60 Folder 117 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 60 Folder 117
Box 60 Folder 118 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 60 Folder 118
Box 60 Folder 119 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 60 Folder 119
Box 60 Folder 120 1960
Debris to the right in foreground, left by construction crew building bridge. The columns to the right are its pillars.
Box 60 Folder 120
Box 60 Folder 122 1960
See exhibits L-4 and L-7 for other views of this movement.
Box 60 Folder 122
Box 61 Folder 15 1960
Yard engines with or without cars, also road trains arriving and departing Minneapolis use these tracks, engines operate and are headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 15
Box 61 Folder 16 1960
Industry where considerable spotting of cars takes place; engines headed in either direction, fireman needed to pass signals as they can only be given on one side.
Box 61 Folder 16
Box 61 Folder 17 1960
Taken from the opposite end of yard in exhibit L-3. Fireman needed for spotting as well as observance of crossing not visible on picture, also a heavy movement of freight and transfer business on four adjacent main lines.
Box 61 Folder 17
Box 61 Folder 18 1960
With a length of steel strapping coated with heavy paper protruding and dragging from a car, fireman would observe this and train would be stopped thereby preventing injury to someone or damage to property.
Box 61 Folder 18
Box 61 Folder 19 1960
Just east of Harrison St. at Minneapolis, MN Junction.Taken in the vicinity of the Northern Pacific Railroad crossing, which is located in the center of the picture running left to right. Engines are operated and headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 19
Box 61 Folder 20 1960
With a length of steel strapping coated with heavy paper protruding and dragging from a car, fireman would observe this and train would be stopped thereby preventing injury to someone or damage to property.
Box 61 Folder 20
Box 61 Folder 21 1960
With a length of steel strapping coated with heavy paper protruding and dragging from a car, fireman would observe this and train would be stopped thereby preventing injury to someone or damage to property.
Box 61 Folder 21
Box 61 Folder 22 1960
GNRR Unit #152. Minneapolis Junction: Engines operate in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 22
Box 61 Folder 23 1960
Roundhouse crews switch cars in both directions.
Box 61 Folder 23
Box 61 Folder 24 1960
Also shows cars on adjacent track in the vicinity of 14th Avenue
Box 61 Folder 24
Box 61 Folder 25 1960
Movement around curve and over crossovers between 14th Avenue and Minneapolis Junction.
Box 61 Folder 25
Box 61 Folder 26 1960
View of the caboose track of Minneapolis Junction, just east of Harrison Street. Engines and trains move in both directions and engines are headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 26
Box 61 Folder 27 1960
Photograph taken from Central Avenue Bridge. Shows the east end of Minneapolis Junction Yard and a portion of the Great Northern North Town Yard. Note cars standing close to public crossing.
Box 61 Folder 27
Box 61 Folder 28 1960
Tracks curve east of Central Avenue at Minneapolis Junction roundhouse. Engines move and are headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 28
Box 61 Folder 29 1960
A great deal of congestion and crossover movements just east of photograph.
Box 61 Folder 29
Box 61 Folder 30 1960
Movement around curve and over crossovers between 14th Avenue and Minneapolis Junction.
Box 61 Folder 30
Box 61 Folder 31 1960
Industry tracks between 14th Avenue and Minneapolis Junction at Gunge Corp. Grain Elevator.
Box 61 Folder 31
Box 61 Folder 32 1960
Engines work and are headed in both directions (like in exhibit L-7)
Box 61 Folder 32
Box 61 Folder 33 1960
Engines operate in either direction
Box 61 Folder 33
Box 61 Folder 34 1960
Engines operate in either direction
Box 61 Folder 34
Box 61 Folder 35 1960
Note close clearance and debris scattered along track by crew building new bridge.
Box 61 Folder 35
Box 61 Folder 36 1960
Just opposite William Bro.s Co.; movement around curve and over crossovers between 14th Avenue and Minneapolis Junction (like in exhibits L-4 and L-13).
Box 61 Folder 36
Box 61 Folder 37 1960
Movement around curve and over crossovers between 14th Avenue and Minneapolis Junction (like in exhibits L-4 and L-13).
Box 61 Folder 37
Box 61 Folder 38 1960
Engines work and are headed in either direction. Tracks in the Union Yards converge at the right- hand portion of the picture with the trackage of the Chicago Northwestern yard.
Box 61 Folder 38
Box 61 Folder 39 1960
Box 61 Folder 39
Box 61 Folder 40 1960
Engines operate in both directions
Box 61 Folder 40
Box 61 Folder 41 1960
Minneapolis Junction: Engines operate in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 41
Box 61 Folder 42 1960
Running under a bridge being constructed. Note crane operation over tracks. Engines operate and are headed both directions.
Box 61 Folder 42
Box 61 Folder 43 1960
Engines operate and are headed both directions
Box 61 Folder 43
Box 61 Folder 44 1960
Also Minnesota transfer tracks in background. Engines operate both directions (like in exhibit L-21).
Box 61 Folder 44
Box 61 Folder 45 1960
Engines operates in both direction (like in exhibit L-21).
Box 61 Folder 45
Box 61 Folder 46 1960
Engines headed both directions.
Box 61 Folder 46
Box 61 Folder 47 1960
Engines headed either direction.
Box 61 Folder 47
Box 61 Folder 48 1960
With a length of steel strapping coated with heavy paper protruding and dragging from a car, fireman would observe this and train would be stopped thereby preventing injury to someone or damage to property.
Box 61 Folder 48
Box 61 Folder 49 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 61 Folder 49
Box 61 Folder 50 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 61 Folder 50
Box 61 Folder 51 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 61 Folder 51
Box 61 Folder 52 1960
Sign on small building on left reads "East Minneapolis"
Box 61 Folder 52
Box 61 Folder 53 1960
GNRR Unit #152. Minneapolis Junction: Engines operate in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 53
Box 61 Folder 54 1960
Engines headed both directions. GN Unit #152 in same location as shown in exhibits L-6 and L-7.
Box 61 Folder 54
Box 61 Folder 55 1960
East of Minneapolis Junction. Sharp curve in background of picture engines headed both directions (same location as shown in exhibit L-2).
Box 61 Folder 55
Box 61 Folder 56 1960
Engines headed both directions and the mainline tracks have a distinct curvature.
Box 61 Folder 56
Box 61 Folder 57 1960
Engines operate and are headed both directions.
Box 61 Folder 57
Box 61 Folder 58 1960
Northern Pacific industry track crossing over the Great Northern's main lines. Engines operate and are headed both directions.
Box 61 Folder 58
Box 61 Folder 59 1960
Northern Pacific industry track crossing over the Great Northern's main lines. Engines operate and are headed either direction
Box 61 Folder 59
Box 61 Folder 60 1960
Commercial crew on crane working on a new bridge under construction. Engines operate in either direction (like in exhibit L-16).
Box 61 Folder 60
Box 61 Folder 61 1960
Engines operate and are headed either direction.
Box 61 Folder 61
Box 61 Folder 62 1960
Running over public crossing and around curve to left of picture. Engines operate both directions.
Box 61 Folder 62
Box 61 Folder 63 1960
Engines headed either direction and traffic is very heavy.
Box 61 Folder 63
Box 61 Folder 64 1960
Engines headed both directions. (same location as seen in exhibit L- 18).
Box 61 Folder 64
Box 61 Folder 65 1960
Box 61 Folder 65
Box 61 Folder 66 1960
Engines work on these tracks in either direction. Curvature of the track is very sharp and there are two conflicting movements so it is very difficult for signals to be passed.
Box 61 Folder 66
Box 61 Folder 67 1960
Engines operate and are headed in either direction
Box 61 Folder 67
Box 61 Folder 68 1960
Engines operate and are headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 68
Box 61 Folder 69 1960
Movement to Union Yard. Engines are headed either direction at this point (same place as exhibits L-28 and L-29).
Box 61 Folder 69
Box 61 Folder 70 1960
Direct view of the converging of the tracks of the Great Northern's Union Yard on the left and the D Yard on the right. Engines headed both directions as you note three engines are in picture at same time and it is possible for them to collide if crossover switches not properly lined.
Box 61 Folder 70
Box 61 Folder 71 1960
Engines operate and are headed in either direction.
Box 61 Folder 71
Box 61 Folder 72 1960
Engines operate both direction on these tracks
Box 61 Folder 72
Box 61 Folder 73 1960
Engines headed both directions in these movements. Numerous curves and crossovers.
Box 61 Folder 73
Box 61 Folder 74 1960
Locomotive backing over the Northern Pacific industrial track coming from the Minneapolis Junction roundhouse, which is to the left towards the union the right. Engines operate and are headed in either direction. This area is congested most of time.
Box 61 Folder 74
Box 61 Folder 102 1960
Main lines between Minneapolis and St Paul. Tracks at left of picture used by Chicago Northwestern Railway. Picture of tracks coming out of Minnesota Transfer Yard leading across main line to Union Yard (same bridge as in exhibit L-21).
Box 61 Folder 102
This series consists of photographs of the Illinois Central's facilities in Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 47, are referred to by the letter N in testimony, and were taken by Fred Howell. Mr. Howell was employed as an engineer and fireman by the Illinois Central in their Memphis Division and was a member of the BLF&E. The Illinois Central was a class I railroad in the central United States, with its primary routes connecting Chicago, Illinois, with New Orleans, Louisiana, and Mobile, Alabama. Branch lines to the west connected Chicago with Sioux City, Iowa, and Omaha, Nebraska. The photographs in this series depict the IC's facilities and industries served in Memphis, Tennessee; Helena, Arkansas; and Clarksdale, Mississippi, including the docks on the Mississippi River where freight cars were loaded onto steamboats for transfer between Mississippi and Arkansas.
Box 56 Folder 2 1960
Shows part of the Memphis terminal. To the right is the diesel shop. The two tracks immediately to the left of the diesel shop are starting and receiving tracks for engines. The tracks that the starting and receiving tracks lead to are the tow main line tracks which are controlled by a block system. The fireman has a great responsibility when the train gets on the main line tracks to watch out for other trains. To the left of the two main line tracks are yard tracks which are used in making up and breaking up trains. There are two or three engines working here at all times. The fireman must always keep the engineer informed as to where the other engines are and keep a watch out not only for the crew members of his own train, but also the crew members working with the other engines and numerous employees working in and about these cars at all hours. He must advise the engineer about any unsafe condition that may arise. This is essential here also on account of the many cross-overs. To the extreme left is an industrial track. You will notice the sharp turn to the left which means that signals have to be passed on the fireman's side. The fireman must also keep a lookout at grade crossings while switching industries.
Box 56 Folder 2
Box 56 Folder 3 1960
Shows part of the Memphis terminal. To the right is the diesel shop. The two tracks immediately to the left of the diesel shop are starting and receiving tracks for engines. The tracks that the starting and receiving tracks lead to are the tow main line tracks which are controlled by a block system. The fireman has a great responsibility when the train gets on the main line tracks to watch out for other trains. To the left of the two main line tracks are yard tracks which are used in making up and breaking up trains. There are two or three engines working here at all times. The fireman must always keep the engineer informed as to where the other engines are and keep a watch out not only for the crew members of his own train, but also the crew members working with the other engines and numerous employees working in and about these cars at all hours. He must advise the engineer about any unsafe condition that may arise. This is essential here also on account of the many cross-overs. To the extreme left is an industrial track. You will notice the sharp turn to the left which means that signals have to be passed on the fireman's side. The fireman must also keep a lookout at grade crossings while switching industries.
Box 56 Folder 3
Box 56 Folder 4 1960
The tracks shown, taken in the Memphis Terminal, are used by all inbound passenger trains, freight trains, and yard engines. There are two crossings here. While the crossings are protected by crossing gates, the vision at these crossings is blocked by the building shown on the right.
Box 56 Folder 4
Box 56 Folder 5 1960
Box 56 Folder 5
Box 56 Folder 6 1960
Illinois Central Unit No. 4030. Manufacturer: EMD Type: E7A
Box 56 Folder 6
Box 56 Folder 7 1960
We see a well traveled crossing in which visibility is restricted because of the warehouse shown at the left, the box cars standing on the tracks, and other obstructions. The tracks are covered by weeds, which hide the debris. These tracks are used by passenger and freight engines, both yard and road. This is the main line looking south when entering Central Station, which has "S" curve. The shanty is at Hulen street where a switch tender was employed, but who has been eliminated. This is a good view showing how the lead crosses the main line to gain access to the "new track." The fireman here is responsible for passing signals and for watching cross-overs and road crossings. This area is switched both at day and at night.
Box 56 Folder 7
Box 56 Folder 8 1960
This picture taken in the Memphis Terminal shows the lay-out of the yard with an engine approaching the Frisco Wye. The fireman is depended upon to keep the engineer informed of the conditions on the track and the movement of other engines. This is a 24-hour a day, day and night operation in a very busy area. There are a number of switch engines working here at all times and there are a great number of employees that work in the industries around this area.
Box 56 Folder 8
Box 56 Folder 9 1960
This is a view of the main line of the Illinois Central at Hulen Street at the top of Beale Street hill. This view is taken looking north. The crossings are not well protected and vision is obscured. As you can see, buildings obstruct vision and there are a great number of turn-outs and cross-overs here. See particularly how the trucks block the tracks. As you can see in the center rear, a large truck is actually blocking one of the tracks. Naturally, under these conditions a fireman must keep particularly close watch. This shows also weeds and debris along the tracks. In fact it is so bad that in some places it is difficult to see the track.
Box 56 Folder 9
Box 56 Folder 10 1960
Illustrates poor housekeeping. Notice how the weeds along the right-of-way obscure the rail and also obscure anything that may be along the track. Clearances are very close. The tracks are blocked by automobile and truck traffic as you can see from the picture. Notice the truck parked on the tracks in the center rear of the picture. Notice also the very close clearance between the truck shown in the far left and the box car shown to its right. Notice also this is quite a hilly area and therefore it's necessary for the box cars to have the brakes set. These tracks are on Tennessee Street in the terminal. They run right in the middle of a public street for half a mile, around a curve in the street. First-class freight trains travel this route, as well as switch engines, with numerous industries, all of which are protected by the fireman, whose responsibilities include taking all the signals in spotting cars, protecting the property of the railroad and the public alike.
Box 56 Folder 10
Box 56 Folder 11 1960
We see a picture of the Memphis Terminal. Shown is a crossing used by several railroads. The fireman has the responsibility of keeping the engineer informed of trains using the crossing while the engineer is taking signals from yard crews on the other side. The crossing is shown in the background of the picture in the center, immediately in front of the locomotive.
Box 56 Folder 11
Box 56 Folder 12 1960
Also in the Memphis Terminal. Shows another blind crossing that is heavily traveled. Here again we have a problem of automobiles parked very close to the track. Clearance is close on the fireman's side along these tracks. As you can see from the picture, there is a good deal of travel across this crossing.
Box 56 Folder 12
Box 56 Folder 13 1960
This picture taken in the Memphis terminal shows the lay-out of the yard with an engine approaching the Frisco Wye. The fireman is depended upon to keep the engineer informed of the conditions on the track and the movement of other engines. This is a 24-hour a day, day and night operation in a very busy area. There is a number of switch engines working here at all times and there is a great number of employees that work in the industries around this area.
Box 56 Folder 13
Box 56 Folder 14 1960
We see a picture of the Memphis terminal. Shown is a crossing used by several railroads. The fireman has the responsibility of keeping the engineer informed of trains using the crossing while the engineer is taking signals from yard crews on the other side. The crossing is shown in the background of the picture in the center, immediately in front of the locomotive.
Box 56 Folder 14
Box 56 Folder 15 1960
Illinois Central Railroad Unit No. 472 in yard near Vaiden Warehouse (699 So. Main Street). This picture of the Memphis terminal shows the congestion of cross-over tracks and also interlocking systems that require the close attention of the fireman to prevent accidents. Notice particularly the sharp curve to the right shown in the center foreground.
Box 56 Folder 15
Box 56 Folder 16 1960
Illinois Central Railroad Unit No. 472 in yard near Vaiden Warehouse (699 So. Main Street). This picture of the Memphis terminal shows the congestion of cross-over tracks and also interlocking systems that require the close attention of the fireman to prevent accidents. Notice particularly the sharp curve to the right shown in the center foreground.
Box 56 Folder 16
Box 56 Folder 17 1960
Stratton Warren Hardware Company (37 E. Carolina Avenue). Shows a very hazardous condition at the Memphis yards. As you can see, there are two cross-overs, one in the foreground and one towards the rear. These conditions require look-out by all members of the crew at all times. There are several railroads that use these cross-over tracks. Notice also how a road runs right next to the railroad tracks shown in the center towards the background of the picture. You can just see the light colored car behind the telephone pole.
Box 56 Folder 17
Box 56 Folder 18 1960
Stratton Warren Hardware Company (37 E. Carolina Avenue). Shows a very hazardous condition at the Memphis yards. As you can see, there are two cross-overs, one in the foreground and one towards the rear. These conditions require look-out by all members of the crew at all times. There are several railroads that use these cross-over tracks. Notice also how a road runs right next to the railroad tracks shown in the center towards the background of the picture. You can just see the light colored car behind the telephone pole.
Box 56 Folder 18
Box 56 Folder 19 1960
J.R. Watkins Company (70 West Crump Boulevard). We see a grade crossing in the Memphis terminal. All signals in this area must be passed on the fireman's side. Note the debris scattered along the right-of-way, and the cars parked near the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 19
Box 56 Folder 20 1960
Here the switching lead crosses the Wye and visibility is very poor. We see the box car left in a bad position where it may be fouling the track immediately to its left. A condition such as this demands someone on the left side of the engine to watch the clearance. (Ssimilar location to Exhibits V-8 and V-8A).
Box 56 Folder 20
Box 56 Folder 21 1960
National Rose Furniture Warehouse (767 Kentucky Street at Railroad Avenue)
Box 56 Folder 21
Box 56 Folder 22 1960
National Rose Furniture Warehouse (767 Kentucky Street at Railroad Avenue). Another view showing particularly poor housekeeping. Notice how weeds have grown up along the right-of-way. In fact, the situation is so bad that it is difficult to see the rail running along the right. See how the road parallels the tracks. There is a good deal of traffic along this road as shown by the numbers of cars parked on the left side of the picture and also by the fact that there is a stop-and-go light along the road in the background.
Box 56 Folder 22
Box 56 Folder 23 1960
Industrial siding
Box 56 Folder 23
Box 56 Folder 24 1960
Night view of the Memphis terminal. Switching is done constantly across the heavily used road crossing. All signals are passed on the fireman's side. Because of the surrounding light in the area, it's very difficult to see signals at nighttime. You have got to pick out one signal light to keep your eye on and you have to keep close watch on that light so that at all times you are sure that you are receiving the signal from your crew and not from a crew working nearby. Of course, this requires extra concentration on the part of the fireman.
Box 56 Folder 24
Box 56 Folder 25 1960
Close clearance
Box 56 Folder 25
Box 56 Folder 26 1960
Illinois Central passenger car to right in photo (cannot be certain of identification). (Same as photographs Internal Nos.14, 17, and 31) The sharp curve in the center to the right of the picture is known as Southern Wye. This wye is used to go east on Broadway (Railroad) Avenue while making transfer delivery to foreign railroads. Approximately 1/2 mile of this track on Broadway is interlocking plant. The remaining track, traveling through the heart of Memphis, over public crossings and crossing two main lines of foreign railroads, is approximately five miles in length. Track leading from center to left is known as Frisco Wye. This wye crosses at approximately 60 degrees angles the Frisco, Missouri Pacific, and Rock Island Main Lines, that are visible only from the fireman's side. The three main lines mentioned above are arranged so that there is a sharp curve after leaving the bridge that spans the Mississippi River. Crews using this track can only see approximately one city block, which is hardly enough visibility for such a congested area (in use by six class-1 railroads with train consists of as many as six diesel units and 150 to 225 cars).
Box 56 Folder 26
Box 56 Folder 27 1960
Shows cars being spotted in the Kimberly Clark building with the fireman receiving signals.
Box 56 Folder 27
Box 56 Folder 28 1960
Taken in the Memphis terminal. This is a congested area. Notice the weeds growing up along the right-of-way. In the picture we see a very dangerous cross-over. Trains crossing the road, which has the stop lights, have poor visibility due to the buildings, which are shown in the center of the photograph. Notice also how automobiles are parked near the tracks. This requires close observation from both sides of the engine to be sure that everything is clear for safe operation. Notice also how the roads leading from the foreground to the rear of the picture parallel the track. There is always the danger of a car or a truck getting too close to a passing train.
Box 56 Folder 28
Box 56 Folder 29 1960
Shows an engine at a crossing. Here again we have the problem of debris and weeds along the tracks. Everybody has to keep a sharp look-out for debris that might derail the engine. There are no signs at this crossing.
Box 56 Folder 29
Box 56 Folder 30 1960
Box 56 Folder 30
Box 56 Folder 31 1960
Bridge across Mississippi River in background. This is Beale Street industry track and team track. A constant lookout is imperative on account of frequent pedestrian and automobile traffic. Trucks block vision and hamper movements at all times. Note how the lead is cut into the main line going north. All these movements are on the fireman's side, even when fouling the main line.
Box 56 Folder 31
Box 56 Folder 32 1960
Taken along the riverfront of the Memphis terminal. Note the weeds obscuring the tracks causing poor footing and obstructing visibility of debris on the track. The tracks which lead in and out of the Beale Street Freight House of the Illinois Central are frequently blocked by transport trucks. You can see the close clearances in the freight house shown in the rear of the picture.
Box 56 Folder 32
Box 56 Folder 33 1960
Shows part of a track in the Memphis terminal known as the "New Track" in Beale Street territory. This section shows very poor housekeeping, evidenced by the weeds along the right-of-way. Note also the treacherous footing. An example is the loose board in the center foreground along the tracks. This creates a bad condition for any one who is compelled to jump on and off moving cars and demands special vigilance on the part of the fireman. Notice also how the road runs right along by the track. You can see several points at which the tracks cross over the road. These crossings are not protected in any way. The driver of automobiles know that there are railroad tracks and railroad trains here, but cars seldom hesitate to look to see whether there are any trains coming. Moreover, the clearances are very close. not more than two or three feet, as you can see from the picture. A trainman riding on a car has to be observed carefully by all employees to ensure safe operation.
Box 56 Folder 33
Box 56 Folder 34 1960
Illinois Central passenger car to right in photo (cannot be certain of identification). (Same as photographs Internal Nos. 14, 17, and 23) The sharp curve in the center to the right of the picture is known as Southern Wye. This wye is used to go east on Broadway (Railroad) Avenue while making transfer delivery to foreign railroads. Approximately 1/2 mile of this track on Broadway is interlocking plant. The remaining track, traveling through the heart of Memphis, over public crossings and crossing two main lines of foreign railroads, is approximately five miles in length. Track leading from center to left is known as Frisco Wye. This wye crosses at approximately 60 degrees angles the Frisco, Missouri Pacific, and Rock Island Main Lines, that are visible only from the fireman's side. The three main lines mentioned above are arranged so that there is a sharp curve after leaving the bridge that spans the Mississippi River. Crews using this track can only see approximately one city block, which is hardly enough visibility for such a congested area (in use by six class-1 railroads with train consists of as many as six diesel units and 150 to 225 cars).
Box 56 Folder 34
Box 56 Folder 35 1960
In the Memphis terminal. Notice that the crossing here is completely blind from all directions due to the buildings on all sides of the crossing. Therefore it is practically impossible to see oncoming traffic until you are almost on the crossing. The street shown is a dead end. There is quite a bit of traffic here due to the industries in the area. You can see the large number of cars parked along the street and at the foot of the street shown in the rear of the picture.
Box 56 Folder 35
Box 56 Folder 36 1960
Clearance between train and wall minimal; engineer side. Shows close clearances in the Kimberly Clark building. The footing is bad. The switching shown is inside a building where close watch at all times is necessary to ensure the safety of the men working on the ground. Signals are passed on the fireman's side. Notice the debris lying on the tracks between the engine and the wall.
Box 56 Folder 36
Box 56 Folder 37 1960
Clearance between train and wall minimal; engineer side. Shows close clearances in the Kimberly Clark building. The footing is bad. The switching shown is inside a building where close watch at all times is necessary to ensure the safety of the men working on the ground. Signals are passed on the fireman's side. Notice the debris lying on the tracks between the engine and the wall.
Box 56 Folder 37
Box 56 Folder 38 1960
IC Unit 427 is on track No. 3, leading out of Kimberly Clark industry. All moves are made from the fireman's side. It is impossible for an engineer to get a signal at any time.
Box 56 Folder 38
Box 56 Folder 39 1960
Locomotive No. 309 & National RoseTruck. Engineer and firemen must watch out for children. We see a sharp curve around towards the right. Signals must be given on the fireman's side. Just at the point of the curve there is a heavily traveled automobile crossing. As you can see there are homes running close by which create a hazard because of the possibility of children running on the tracks.
Box 56 Folder 39
Box 56 Folder 40 1960
Shows a general view of the tracks at Memphis, Tennessee. The signal shown opposite the switches in the picture are lit up at night by old-fashioned kerosene lamps, not by electric lights. Frequently because of the wind and the vibration these lights are out at night and therefore the engineer and fireman have to rely upon being able to see the switch points in order to determine how the switches are lined. Note also the houses close to the track which of course poses the hazard of children running out from the houses onto the track. You notice that there are no fences along the right-of-way to keep off children. Notice also on right side of picture the footpath for pedestrians. In fact, one pedestrian can be seen walking along the path which parallels the tracks. Note also the numerous sharp curves leading off to the left rear and farther back towards the right rear.
Box 56 Folder 40
Box 56 Folder 41 1960
Taken in Helena, Arkansas and shows a particularly dangerous situation: an oil tank spotted at an industry. Just beyond the oil tank you can see a road crossing which is used by employees of the company and by passenger cars. There is no warning whatsoever that there is a railroad track at this point. Moreover, the view of the automobiles is cut off by the buildings on each side of the street.
Box 56 Folder 41
Box 56 Folder 42 1960
Taken in Helena, Arkansas and shows a particularly dangerous situation--an oil tank spotted at an industry there. Just beyond the oil tank you can see a road crossing which is used by employees of the company and by passenger cars. There is no warning whatsoever that there is a railroad track at this point. Moreover, the view of the automobiles is cut off by the buildings on each side of the street.
Box 56 Folder 42
Box 56 Folder 43 1960
This view was taken while switching Kimberly Clark in North Memphis. All signals are taken on the fireman's side. This plant is completely switched three times a day, seven days a week. There are nine tracks to switch and spot. Sometimes as many as 125 cars are handled in an eight-hour period. N-37 shows spotting cars in track #4 which holds approximately 5 cars, all enclosed under a building with nothing but a trick wall and wheel stops at the end of the rail. There are seven of such tracks that are enclosed under a roof and all signals are taken on the fireman's side.
Box 56 Folder 43
Box 56 Folder 44 1960
Shows a spur track in Clarksdale, Mississippi. This spur track leads back into several industries. By observation you can see the poor housekeeping here as shown by the overgrowth of weeds along the right-of-way. Naturally, a sharp look-out must be kept under these conditions for debris that might cause a derailment or other damage to the train. Along this track there are several crossings that are not protected. One crossing is used a great deal, and, as the picture shows, the view of the locomotive coming out of this spur track is blocked by the two buildings shown in the picture, one on each side of the track.
Box 56 Folder 44
Box 56 Folder 45 1960
Ferry operation between Trotters Point, MS and Helena, AK. Photo taken on Trotter Point side. Another picture of the incline down to the float on the way to Helena-Trotters Point of ferry.
Box 56 Folder 45
Box 56 Folder 46 1960
Shows the passenger platform tracks at Clarksdale. It is essential to maintain a sharp watch-out here because passengers frequently cross the tracks on the way to the platform shown to the left of the picture. Notice also the sharp curve to the right.
Box 56 Folder 46
Box 56 Folder 47 1960
Delta Grocery & Cotton Co. Shows an industrial track at Clarksdale, Mississippi. The picture shows two unprotected crossings, one in the foreground and one in the rear toward the Delta Grocery and Cotton Company. Notice how close the Ford Truck is parked to the track, making it imperative to maintain a sharp lookout. The general public makes great use of the crossings because of the vicinity of the grocery house. Also, it is in the vicinity of the Illinois Central Depot. Passenger automobiles are parked on and close to racks. There are several points on this track where automobiles are parked so close to the right-of-way that there is danger of side-swiping them. Naturally movement is made along this track both in the daytime and at night and in rainy and stormy weather.
Box 56 Folder 47
Box 56 Folder 48 1960
We see tracks leading to a "float" or ferry across the Mississippi River. This picture is taken at Trotters Point, Mississippi, and shows a view of the track leading down to the float. Note here the heavy undergrowth along the right-of-way and the obstruction by the small building used by the track maintenance department. Due to the undergrowth of this building all signals are given on the fireman's side at this particular point. The way the switching is handled at Trotters Point is as follows: the cars are pulled by the engine from Clarksdale, Mississippi to Trotters Point. At Trotters Point there are three switch tracks. The reason for this is that it is necessary to line the cars up so that the maximum number of cars possible can be put on the float. Also, it is necessary to put the cars in front of the engine so that the cars can be pushed on the float. If there is a great deal of back and forth switching at Trotters Point there is a great number of obstructions which make it absolutely essential to maintain a watch on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 56 Folder 48
Box 56 Folder 49 1960
We see tracks leading to a "float" or ferry across the Mississippi River. This picture is taken at Trotters Point, Mississippi, and shows a view of the track leading down to the float. Note here the heavy undergrowth along the right-of-way and the obstruction by the small building used by the track maintenance department. Due to the undergrowth of this building all signals are given on the fireman's side at this particular point. The way the switching is handled at Trotters Point is as follows: the cars are pulled by the engine from Clarksdale, Mississippi to Trotters Point. At Trotters Point there are three switch tracks. The reason for this is that it is necessary to line the cars up so that the maximum number of cars possible can be put on the float. Also, it is necessary to put the cars in front of the engine so that the cars can be pushed on the float. If there is a great deal of back and forth switching at Trotters Point there is a great number of obstructions which make it absolutely essential to maintain a watch on both sides of the locomotive.
Box 56 Folder 49
Box 56 Folder 50 1960
IC Unit No. 601. We see a view of Clarksdale, Mississippi. The locomotive shown in the picture is pulling out of what is known as the Wye. As shown in the picture, as the engineer pulls around his view in front of him is completely obstructed by the curve and he has to rely entirely upon the fireman to maintain a lookout as to what is in front of the engine.
Box 56 Folder 50
Box 56 Folder 51 1960
Cotton bales. Close clearance. Taken at Clarksdale, Mississippi. Note how the underbrush is permitted to grow up around the tracks and even to obscure the tracks. It's important to maintain a very close watch where these conditions exist and to spot debris on the ground that might cause a derailment. The loading platform shown in the picture is used not only for railroad employees in this area, but also by other persons. It is the duty of the fireman and the engineer to make sure that all personnel, railroad and non-railroad, are out of the way before a car is moved.
Box 56 Folder 51
Box 56 Folder 52 1960
Ferry operation between Trotters Point, MS and Helena, AK. Photo taken from Arkansas side. Taken over on the other Arkansas side of the Mississippi River and shows the incline on that side which leads down to the ferry. Here again notice the poor housekeeping on the incline. Observe the weeds growing up along the right of way. The concrete retaining wall shown on the left side of the picture and the concrete wall shown on the right side of the picture both cut down visibility and make it essential to have a look-out on both sides of the locomotive. You will notice a footpath in the middle of the track that leads from incline to the sea wall. This is used by pedestrians going to and from the river. Because the sea wall blocks the view of both pedestrians and the engine crew it is most important to keep close observation in order to prevent injury to pedestrians in this area. Float operations are carried out across the Mississippi River in all kinds of weather. Vision is often times obstructed by dense fog.
Box 56 Folder 52
Box 56 Folder 53 1960
Car float in picture. Unit No. 609. Shows the ferry operation between Trotters Point, Mississippi, and Helena, Arkansas. This is a picture taken on the Trotters Point side of the Mississippi River. This photograph shows a locomotive backing a car on a long incline toward the ferry which is shown just pulling up toward the shore. This operation is extremely hazardous and requires great alertness on the part of both the fireman and the engineer. As you can see from the picture it is obviously essential for the locomotive to push the car being loaded on the ferry. From eight to twelve cards are loaded on the ferry, the exact number depending upon the type of car being loaded. The engine is placed on the boat when transferring cards from the Mississippi side to the Arkansas side and on the return trip. On account of two tracks on the boat the engine has to shove the cars on the boat in order to put cars on both tracks. This operation actually cuts off the view of the engineer because his view is restricted not only by the locomotive but also by the cars which he is pushing. Moreover, there is the problem that loading the cars on the ferry has to be done very carefully and very precisely, because there is always a certain amount of movement of the ferry due to current on the river while the cars are being loaded. Naturally the same considerations apply where the cars are being pulled off the ferry.
Box 56 Folder 53
Box 56 Folder 54 1960
Shows the locomotive just starting down the long incline to the float. The track is overgrown with weeds which of course adds to the hazard. The small building shown in the center background of the picture is a track storage house for track material. This house is located very badly because it obstructs the view of the fireman in loading and unloading the float as the engine goes back and forth down the incline.
Box 56 Folder 54
Box 56 Folder 55 1960
Close-up view showing the ferry Pelican tied up at the Trotters Point side of the Mississippi River.
Box 56 Folder 55
This series consists of photographs of the Rock Island's and other carriers' facilities in and around the Kansas City Terminal. These photographs were submitted to the Commission as Employees' Exhibit 42, are referred to by the letter V in testimony, and were taken by M.H. LaRue. Mr. LaRue was employed as a fireman and engineman on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific (The Rock Island) in the Missouri/Kansas Division and was a member of the BLF&E. The Rock Island was a class I railroad in the central United States, operating in Arkansas, Colorado, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota and Texas. The photographs in this series document the Rock Island's facilities in and around Kansas City (both Missouri and Kansas) as well as the facilities of other carriers. Also found in this series are photographs of the Rock Island's facilities in Topeka, Kansa and St. Joseph, Missouri. Kansas City Union Station and its surrounding yards are documented in this series.
Box 59 Folder 61 1960
Leaving Kansas City, Missouri bound for St Joseph, Missouri. Runs several times a year.
Box 59 Folder 61
Box 59 Folder 62 1960
Looking from south to north. Depot is in background, on the right. Grain elevator and silos in left background. Between the two is rolling stock on yard tracks. Many of the switch stands on the fireman's side of the engine. Also note grade crossing in foreground.
Box 59 Folder 62
Box 59 Folder 63 1960