From Manuscript to Print: the Evolution of the Medieval Book

 

Printing on Parchment
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One of the drawbacks of printing on parchment arose from the inconsistent quality of the animal-hides used to make it. Hides were not entirely opaque; thus a given page sometimes had translucent patches where the text on the other side showed through, making some of the words difficult to read, as in this printed Book of Hours. The problem did not occur with paper, which offered a consistently opaque surface.

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Book of Hours. Paris, 1538.
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Introduction
the Sacred Word
Churchbooks
Private Prayer
Letterforms
Leather and Chains
Medieval Music
Schoolbooks
How the Classics Survived
Manuscripts in the Age of Print
Evolution of the Book
Appetite for Destruction
Manuscript Facsimiles
Cornell's Medieval Books
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