From Manuscript to Print: the Evolution of the Medieval Book

 

Illuminated Print
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Since Books of Hours were bestsellers before the advent of printing, it was natural that early printer-publishers should try to find a niche within this high-demand market. The artists who supplied the illuminations for the handwritten Books of Hours were perfectly willing to do the same for printed versions of the popular prayerbooks. This Book of Hours, printed on fine parchment, strives to imitate the familiar work of the scribes.

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Book of Hours. Paris, 1513.
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Introduction
the Sacred Word
Churchbooks
Private Prayer
Letterforms
Leather and Chains
Medieval Music
Schoolbooks
How the Classics Survived
Manuscripts in the Age of Print
Evolution of the Book
Appetite for Destruction
Manuscript Facsimiles
Cornell's Medieval Books
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