Milton R. Konvitz Papers

Collection Number: /4039

Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library


DESCRIPTIVE SUMMARY

Title:
Milton R. Konvitz Papers,
Collection Number:
/4039
Creator:
Konvitz, Milton R.
Quantity:
204.8 linear ft.
Forms of Material:
Papers (documents) .
Repository:
Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library
Language:
Collection material in English, German, Yiddish


BIOGRAPHICAL NOTE

March 12, 1908 - September 5, 2003
Milton Konvitz, a Cornell University faculty member and authority on constitutional and labor law, and civil and human rights, died Sept. 5 at the age of 95. Konvitz was a founding faculty member in the School of Industrial and Labor Relations from 1946 until his retirement in 1973. He was also a professor in Cornell's Law School.
Konvitz is perhaps best known for his American Ideals course, which he taught to more than 8,000 students over the course of his career, never giving the same lecture twice. "I saw the U.S. Constitution as it has been interpreted as a magnificent depository of our ideals, both individual and social," he said. His course exposed students to the great intellectual thinkers and philosophers throughout history whose writings had shaped those ideals. They included Sophocles, whose play Antigone is Cornell's New Student Reading Project this year. One student he influenced was U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Cornell Class of 1954, who considers him a mentor.
At Cornell Konvitz also was a founder of the university's Department of Near Eastern Studies and Program of Jewish Studies. "I felt it was essential for a college interested in the humanities not to leave out Hebrew language and literature," he said. "And the knowledge of Jewish history, which began 4,000 years ago and has contributed to civilization no less than Greek, Roman or English history, is important to today's students -Jewish and non-Jewish." He often hosted students at his Ithaca home and helped start the first Kosher dining option at Cornell, Young Israel House.
In addition, for nearly 30 years he directed the Liberian Codification Project, which drew up the official body of statutory laws that is still in force in the Republic of Liberia today, despite the current political upheaval there. Konvitz also edited the opinions of Liberia's Supreme Court and received the Grand Band of the Order of the Star of Africa, the highest award given to foreigners, as well as an honorary degree from the University of Liberia, one of seven honorary degrees he received in his lifetime.
Active as a scholar and writer until his death, he wrote books and articles on American constitutional law that won him wide recognition and were cited in U.S. Supreme Court opinions. Among his nine books is Fundamental Liberties of a Free People: Religion, Speech, Press, Assembly, which was republished earlier this year with an expanded introduction by him that is strongly critical of the Rehnquist Supreme Court. Other books include A Century of Civil Rights (1983) and Judaism and Human Rights (2nd ed. 2001). He also edited a dozen volumes, including two on American philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson, whose thinking shaped his views. One Emersonian idea he absorbed was that readers give life to books, which Konvitz recast as follows: "It is in their hearing that students bring life to the words, the thoughts, the teacher."
Konvitz was born in Safed, Palestine (now Israel ), in 1908, the son of a rabbi. He immigrated to the United States in 1915 and became a naturalized citizen in 1926. He received a bachelor's degree in 1929 and a law degree in 1930, both from New York University, and a Ph.D. in philosophy from Cornell in 1933. Before joining Cornell's faculty, he was one of three assistant general counsels to Thurgood Marshall at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund for three years.
He is survived by his wife, Mary, of Oakhurst, N.J.; a brother, Phillip, of Elberon, N.J.; a son and daughter-in-law, Josef and Isa, of Paris, France; and two grandsons, Eli and Ezra. Josef Konvitz, who grew up in Ithaca, is now an official at the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.
SUBJECTS

Names:
Konvitz, Milton R. (Milton Ridvas), 1908-2003.
New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations --Faculty.

Form and Genre Terms:
Papers (documents)


INFORMATION FOR USERS

Access Restrictions:
Access to the collections in the Kheel Center is restricted. Please contact a reference archivist for access to these materials.
Restrictions on Use:
This collection must be used in keeping with the Kheel Center Information Sheet and Procedures for Document Use.
Cite As:
Milton R. Konvitz Papers #/4039. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.

RELATED MATERIALS

Related Collections:
/3033: Milton R. Konvitz Liberian Project Files
/4039 AV: Milton R. Konvitz American Ideals Lectures Audio-Visual Materials
/4039 B: Milton R. Konvitz Additional Papers
/4039 L: Milton R. Konvitz Liberian Codification Project
/4085: Milton R. Konvitz Additional Papers
SERIES LIST

Series I: Correspondence
Series II: Subject FIles, 1942-1986
Series III: Academic Files
Sub-Series 1. Correspondence
Sub-Series 2. Subject Files
Sub-Series 3. Lectures/Notes
Sub-Series 4. Course Outlines
Sub-Series 5. Student Papers

CONTAINER LIST

Container
Description
Date
Box 1 Folder 1 1971-1980
In a group of pamphlets from James Luther Adams is a copy of a letter from Oliver Wendell Holmes addressed to Judge Wyzanski in response to the latter's request that Holmes summarize his beliefs in the motives of the legal profession (September 9, 1937). Professor Konvitz mentions in a letter to Chimon Abramsky that he no longer subscribes to the New York Review of Books because he "got a little tired of its dogmatic Leftism, and of the control that Noam Chomsky and I.F. Stone seemed to have over who writes what," (November 1, 1974). Konvitz wrote to congratulate the Honorable Shimon Agranat, Chief Justice of the Israeli Supreme Court, on retiring. Konvitz draws a comparison between the Courts of Israel and the United States and compliments Agranat on a significant role in the formation of the Israeli Court (September 20, 1976). In a letter to Professor Sydney E. Ahlstrom, Yale University, Doctor Konvitz requests references to sources which discuss the influence of Emerson on Friedrich W. Nietzsche and mentions Emerson's influence on his own world view (June 2, 1978). Personal letter from Konvitz to Mister Gershon Jacobson and Mister Nissan Gordon regarding Konvitz's reasons for not renewing his subscription to the Algemeine Journal. Doctor Konvitz explains that although he was "brought up" with a respect and even love for Yiddish newspapers, he found the Algemeine to be too narrow, "not Jewish but rabbinical and clerical, and even the rabbinism that it cultivates is limited to that which characterizes a part of Brooklyn and the Lower East Side," (July 5, 1975).
Box 1 Folder 2 1946-1980
[1946-1955]-1980. Correspondence with Professor Carl A. Auerbach, University of Wisconsin Law School, regarding the selection of texts for undergraduates. Konvitz prefers not to use the same readings twice to keep the course interesting (1950); Regarding Konvitz's text, Fundamental Liberties, Auerbach is in disagreement on some basic issues. Auerbach does not believe "that the clear and present danger is a 'constitutional jewel' if legislation curtailing totalitarian movements is in question." Professor Auerbach directs Konvitz to Auerbach's article, "The Communist Control Act of 1954: A Proposed Legal-Political Theory of Free Speech," which addresses this question. Exchange of letters with Charles Abrams regarding Stuyvesant Town Case (1947); David Selden, in response to Selden's interest in establishing an American Federation of Teachers local at Cornell University with Konvitz's help, Professor Konvitz informs him that the attitude of the Industrial and Labor Relations professors is that they should not become members of any organization identified with either labor or management (1954); With George M. Houser, Executive Director, American Committee on Africa regarding Committee's request that Konvitz sign a position paper on "The United States and South Africa." Konvitz declines because he believes that the statement's contents relating to the war in Vietnam are irrelevant to its purpose and in some instances unjustified although Professor Konvitz opposed the Vietnam War. He would sign the statement on South Africa if it were limited to the topic (1968); with Louis H. Glickman, Western New York State Regional Director, Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, regarding Konvitz's concern that the Cornell Club of Buffalo no longer meet at the Buffalo Athletic Club because it discriminated against Blacks (1969); routine correspondence. Last few letters in the folder with Avital of the "Hebrew Culture Foundation" - there are several folders on the Foundation also to be found under "H" in another series of this collection.
Box 1 Folder 3 1935-1966
Personal correspondence including letter dated January 1935 from Samuel Alexander on Konvitz's thesis.
Box 1 Folder 4 1963
Box 1 Folder 5 1968-1974
1968-1969, 1974. Routine from letters, reports, an article, and a pamphlet.
Box 1 Folder 6 1973-1980
Correspondence with Professor James L. Adams, The Divinity School, Harvard University, in which they discuss their scholarly activities and opinions on religion (particularly Judaism), the first amendment to the constitution, Iran, and the issue of abortion. In this correspondence, Doctor Konvitz recounted the establishment of the magazine Judaism. Konvitz also recounted conversations with Horace Kallen in which Kallen told Konvitz about his relationship with Barrett Wendell (April 7, 1975). Also discussed is Judge Wyzanski and Professor Konvitz's high regard for him as a jurist (December 11, 1974) and Professor Adam's acquaintanceship with the Reverend Jesse Jackson (June 16, 1975)
Box 1 Folder 7 1961-1969
1961-1964, 1969. Routine Industrial and Labor Relations personnel and administrative policy matters.
Box 1 Folder 8 1969-1974
1969-[1970-1974]. Includes letters of recommendation for law schools, graduate schools, and Cornell University.
Box 1 Folder 9 1960-1963
Includes academic information on Professor Konvitz's freshman advisees.
Box 1 Folder 10 1957-1960
[1957-1958]-1960. Letters from several organizations requesting a copy of Konvitz's study of suits for damages by or against unions.
Box 1 Folder 11 1957
Correspondence with Mister Simon Rosenzweig, lawyer regarding possibility of Rosenzweig researching questions involved in the law of agency as they may affect unions. Konvitz is responding to the interest of Arthur Goldberg, American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations counsel, in investigating the question as to when a union can be held responsible as a principal. Konvitz is interested in a study of cases under the Norris-LaGuardia Act, the Taft-Hartley Act, comparable state statutes, and the cases involving common law principles (January 15, 1957).
Box 1 Folder 12 1965-1972
1965-[1967-1971]-1972. Includes by-laws, memorandums, resolutions, newsletters, directories, etcetera.
Box 1 Folder 13 1958-1963
Correspondence regarding Zionism, the World Zionist Organization, the question of aliyah and American Jews and Jewish affairs in Argentina, Brazil, and South America in general, Judaism and its place in the modern world, European anti-Semitism, and other aspects of Jewish intellectual life.
Box 1 Folder 14 1966-1986
Correspondence regarding anti-Semitism, Begin's policy regarding Jerusalem (November 3, 1980), women rabbis and other debates within the Rabbinic Assembly, the need for a Black-Jewish dialogue, the nature of conservative Judaism and the changing nature of the movement. Also discussion of Camp David accords.
Box 1 Folder 15 1964
Box 1 Folder 16 1972-1980
1972-1973, 1975-1978, 1980. Correspondence with Professor Yonah Alexander, State University of New York at Oneonta, regarding programs in Israel and routine professional matters. Alexander works on issues relating to programs for American students in Israel, international terrorism and other international studies.
Box 1 Folder 17 1954-1960
Includes miscellaneous letters, memorandums, reports, publication lists, minutes, etcetera from a variety of organizations. Also included is a copy of the 1908 "Certificate of Incorporation of the American-Palestinian Society" which was signed by Rabbi Joseph Konvitz among others.
Box 1 Folder 18 1948-1955
1948, [1950-1953], 1955. Includes letters, reports, and pother documents regarding Konvitz's activities and findings as arbitrator in two arbitration cases: United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America, Local 331 versus General Cable Corporation (1953) and Gowanda Leather Workers Union versus Moench Tanning Company (1950).
Box 1 Folder 19 1953-1963
1953, 1958, [1961-1962]-1963. Includes correspondence, awards with related documents regarding arbitration hearings conducted by Doctor Konvitz. Most of the documents regarding United Packinghouse Food and Allied Workers of America, Local 463, American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations versus Breakstone Foods, Division National Dairy Products Corporation.
Box 1 Folder 20 1955-1969
1955, [1956- 1964]-1969. Includes requests for contributions and lists of contributors sponsored by Konvitz.
Box 1 Folder 21 1947-1953
[1947-1949], 1953. Correspondence with Israel S. Chipkin, Executive Director, American Association for Jewish Education, regarding Association activities and meetings. Chipkin disagrees with Konvitz's article in Commentary which deals with religion in Israel (November 1949). Professor Konvitz explains the intention and meaning of his Chicago address which he believes Chipkin had "mis-read." Konvitz also defends his article in Commentary. Konvitz agrees that every bureau of Jewish education should respect diversities of opinion and that there is no orthodoxy. He explains his tolerance for differences of opinion and his philosophy "is to look for points of agreement rather than for points of difference in my relations to other persons and in my relations to social movements I am not afraid of differences, and I do love similarity, but one does not swallow up the other." He mentions that he was drawn to the Industrial and Labor Relations school "precisely for the reason that our policy here is to find points of agreement between management and labor and in all other social problems with which we are concerned," (May 19). Also included is a document by Konvitz "Quotations from 'Judaism and the Democratic Ideal,'" excerpts from his paper for the main address at the Opening Session of the 1948 American Association for Jewish Education annual Meeting (May 1948). Other routine American Association for Jewish Education matters and personal correspondence with Chipkin.
Box 1 Folder 22 1957-1959
Includes correspondence with many participants involved in writing "A National Study of Jewish Education in the United States: 1952-1959." Doctor Konvitz was chairman of the Commission for the Study of Jewish Education in the United States. The file also includes the outline, the Interim Report, memorandums, and Committee meeting minutes.
Box 2 Folder 1 1964-1965
1a. Data Collection Forms for American Association for Jewish Education Study of Jewish Education in America. Includes blank copies of the interview and questionnaire forms. 1. Includes proposals, reports, form letters, and constitution and by-laws (December 5, 1964). Also includes reports and minutes of the B'nai B'rith Commission on Adult Jewish Education, of which Konvitz was a member.
Box 2 Folder 2 1951-1960
Includes proposals, reports, minutes, newsletters, and form letters
Box 2 Folder 3 1967-1975
1972- , 1967-1974/1975. Includes publications, minutes, form letters, newsletters, budgets, reports, agenda and some routine Association and personal correspondence. Correspondence with Doctor Charles Berlin, Executive Secretary of the Association for Jewish Studies. Correspondence with Robert H. Arnow, President of the American Association for Jewish Education. Konvitz responds to the draft of the agreement between the American Association for Jewish Education and the Department of Education and Culture. Doctor Konvitz suggests that the phraseology of the agreement should be more neutral and avoid such statements as "the morality of Israel in Arab relations;" "the right of Israel to the land." Also, Konvitz does not believe that it is the purpose of the American Association for Jewish Education to contribute to bringing youth and adults to "live in Israel," (November 12, 1971). Konvitz accepts Arnow's invitation to serve as a member of the National Commission to guide and advise the American Association for Jewish Education in the development of policy, program and curriculum materials for Jewish studies in public high schools and colleges (November 1972 [?] and June 1970)
Box 2 Folder 4 1946-1951
Correspondence with Doctor Aharon Kessler, Director, Community Service and Consultation. American Association for Jewish Education regarding routine Association and personal matters. Konvitz expresses dismay regarding his Chicago address to the American Council for Judaism because he sees few others arguing "for the cause of liberalism and freedom in the state of Israel," (May 5, 1949) and his concern that such a position has made him a target for criticism by some Zionists (March 8, 1949-May 5, 1949)
Box 2 Folder 5 1955-1966
Correspondence with Philip W. Lown, President of Boston Hebrew Teachers College regarding fund raising. Konvitz mentions that he will help the Hebrew University to plan a labor relations department and if he has any time after he will do some work with the Histadrut (May 11, 1961). Konvitz explains the advisability - and urgency - of American Association for Jewish Education interest in and concern with Jewish education in the area of American higher education." Konvitz emphasizes the need for Jewish education on university and college campuses and notes that Hillel directors on American campuses are rabbis and not teachers. Hillel provides educational services only marginally and does not have enough financial support to address students' educational needs. Also, Konvitz stresses the importance of educating non-Jewish students about Judaism and Jews on a level worthy of the respect of university professors and students (January 20, 1956). In a letter to Lown honoring his 65th birthday, Konvitz praises Lown's contribution to the Jewish community (November 12, 1955). Also included are routine personal correspondence, some routine Association correspondence with other American Association of Jewish Education officers and a summary report of the study on "The National Curriculum Institute" (1959).
Box 2 Folder 6 1948-1953
[1948-1950]-1953. Correspondence regarding routine Association finance matters.
Box 2 Folder 7 1959-1966
1959-[1965-1966]. Doctor Konvitz expresses his interest in continuing to personally solicit membership contributions from his friends (January 17, 1966). Konvitz was unanimously re-elected American Association for Jewish Education Vice President for the year 1960-1961 (June 7, 1960). Also includes some routine association correspondence, minutes, article reprints, form letters, agendas, proposed budget and financial reports.
Box 2 Folder 8 1947-1959
Correspondence on routine Association matters.
Box 2 Folder 9 1949-1957
[1949-1954] 1957. Correspondence with Doctor Judah Pilch regarding routine Association and personal matters. Konvitz suggests that an Association survey be conducted along the lines followed by Myrdal when he planned the American Dilemma: qualified persons should be found to conduct research and prepare memoranda on topics selected by the Association that way stimulating the interest of young scholars in the field of Jewish education and Jewish community life as a by-product of the project (December 7, 1951).
Box 2 Folder 10 1955-1959
Correspondence with Doctor Judah Pilch regarding routine Association and personal matters. Doctor Konvitz informs Pilch that he is leaving for Liberia September 9, 1959. The President of Liberia requested that he travel to Liberia to advise him on labor conditions and labor law. He also received encouragement to travel to Liberia from the Ambassador in Washington and the President of the Firestone Plantations (November 26, 1959). Konvitz mentions that he has been meeting daily from 9-4 with a five-man commission from Liberia to confer with them on the Liberian Code. He expects them to stay in Ithaca for at least a month. He mentions that "the work means a great deal to me, and I am anxious that we do for the Liberian Government and people a first-rate job" (August 26 and September 1955)
Box 2 Folder 11 1953-1954
Includes correspondence, minutes of various meetings, publications and reports.
Box 2 Folder 12 1947-1957
1947-1951, 1953-1955, 1957. Includes minutes, agendas, reports, form letters, releases and programs, American Association for Jewish Education Advisory Committee meeting (November 30, 1955) and Board of Governors meeting November 5-6, 1955.
Box 2 Folder 13 1947-1954
Correspondence with Michael A. Stavitsky, President of the American Association for Jewish Education regarding Association and personal matters. Professor Konvitz is asked to serve as a chairman of the plenary session of the Second National Conference on Jewish Education, to be devoted to a consideration of "Critical Issues in Jewish Education," (February 12, 1954). Konvitz invited to serve on a 5-member American Association for Jewish Education council for Jewish Education to discuss a Code of Practice for the professionals. Konvitz noted at a Board of Governors meeting that it is essential for the college level. (American Association for Jewish Education Board of Governors meeting minutes March 23, 1952). Also minutes from other committee meetings, committee reports and meeting agendas.
Box 2 Folder 14 1975-1980
Routine minutes, reports, salary, budget and financial statements, memorandums, bulletins, and form letters.
Box 2 Folder 15 1948
Routine Correspondence
Box 2 Folder 16 1953-1970
1953, 1966-[1967]-1970. Correspondence concerning activities of the Special Committee on Academic Freedom in Church-Related Colleges and Universities of which Konvitz was a member. Includes form letters, reports, statements, memorandums, newsletters, news clippings, membership lists and meeting announcements for the Cornell chapter of the American Association of University Professors.
Box 3 Folder 1 1953-1969
1953, 1956 [1961-1964, 1966] 1969. Routine documents including several Record of Council Meeting reports, committee reports, Council letters and minutes.
Box 3 Folder 2 1964-1968
[1964-1966]-1968. Memorandum materials, routine documents and correspondence.
Box 3 Folder 3 1964-1965
Routine documents and correspondence
Box 3 Folder 4 1957-1973
1957 [1961-1965] 1973. Konvitz was the first chairman of the Cornell University Faculty Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure. Doctor Konvitz played an active role in the faculty's opposition to changes in the University's legislation which he thought "adversely qualified the principles of academic freedom, and particularly in the procedural sense." Konvitz served as chairman for 1 year, 1957 (November 30, 1966). Konvitz comments on several draft and position papers including one on the American Association of University Professors 1940 statement on academic freedom and tenure in church-related institutions and dismissal proceedings among other activities (February 10, 1966). Also includes routine correspondence and other organizational documents.
Box 3 Folder 5 1953-1979
1953-1954, 1962, 1964-1966, 1970-1971, 1974-1976, 1979. Miscellaneous material and correspondence. Material regarding the Section of the Individual Rights and Responsibilities of the American Bar Association, of which Konvitz is a member.
Box 3 Folder 6 1948-1962
1948-1956, 1962. Professor Konvitz wrote to President Deane W. Malott of Cornell University on behalf of the American Friends of Hebrew University requesting Malott's approval of a plan that would enable Cornell students to spend a year in study at a Hebrew University in Jerusalem (January 11, 1955). Konvitz responds to questions of Professor Oscar I. Janowsky, Chairman of the Academic Council on a number of issues regarding university policies (for example student conduct, May 17 1954, and student representation January 15, 1953). Konvitz and Professor M.F. Neufeld conducted a campaign among Cornell faculty for membership on the American Friends for Hebrew University. Includes other routine correspondence and materials regarding the organization and policies and programs at Hebrew University.
Box 3 Folder 7 1975-1980
1975-[1978-1980]. Includes minutes of the Board of Directors Meetings, Executive Committee Meetings, American Civil Liberties Union Foundation Board, Meetings and National Advisory Council Meetings of which Konvitz was a member. Also includes routine organizational documents. Also a letter from Roger N. Baldwin, founder of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1920 and its director until 1950. Baldwin mentions that he's been aware of Konvitz all these years through his writings and some of his students. Baldwin also says that he remains "optimistic about the prospect of a world order of laws, not arms, painful as the process is -- but it's growing." Baldwin also mentions that he vividly remembers their years of association when they shared a small office "and you handled so competently our legal work that I never had a question or concern," (September 9, 1979).
Box 3 Folder 8 1975-1980
1975-[1978-1980]. Includes minutes of the Board of Directors Meetings, Executive Committee Meetings, American Civil Liberties Union Foundation Board, Meetings and National Advisory Council Meetings of which Konvitz was a member. Also includes routine organizational documents. Also a letter from Roger N. Baldwin, founder of the American Civil Liberties Union in 1920 and its director until 1950. Baldwin mentions that he's been aware of Konvitz all these years through his writings and some of his students. Baldwin also says that he remains "optimistic about the prospect of a world order of laws, not arms, painful as the process is -- but it's growing." Baldwin also mentions that he vividly remembers their years of association when they shared a small office "and you handled so competently our legal work that I never had a question or concern," (September 9, 1979).
Box 4 Folder 1 1949-1963
Bulk of the folder includes minutes and memorandums of the Academic Freedom Committee including document regarding the position of the American Civil Liberties Union on Communism
Box 4 Folder 2 1963-1968
[1963-1964] 1966-1968. Including American Civil Liberties Union Board of Directors meeting minutes, memorandums and agendas, Academic freedom Committee Minutes, non-released reports, financial information, bulletins and other routine union materials.
Box 4 Folder 3 1965-1967
Includes memorandums and minutes of various committees including the committees on free speech/association, radio/television communications media, due process and labor. Includes a memorandum from Roger N. Baldwin, supporting the 1964 Union policy restricting membership of office in the American Civil Liberties Union to individuals whose views on association are consistent with the Union's purpose (June 7, 1965). Also includes non-released papers, financial reports, and other routine American Civil Liberties Union materials.
Box 4 Folder 4 1965-1967
Memorandums and minutes of the Board of Directors, non- released papers, materials from various local Union Chapters and other routine American Civil Liberties Union materials.
Box 4 Folder 5 1966-1972
1966-1969, 1971-1972. As a member of the Constitution Committee, Doctor Konvitz was also on the Special Committee on the 1940 Resolution and the Constitution Committee (December 8, 1966). Includes policy and financial statements, memorandums and minutes of various committees. Also includes minutes and memorandums of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee as well as other routine Union materials.
Box 4 Folder 6 1950-1951
Includes reports on activities of the Commission on Law and Social Action of the American Jewish Congress; monthly National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Incorporated, reports and issues of American Civil Liberties Union publications.
Box 4 Folder 7 1954
Includes several issues of the reports and publications in the previous file as well as a number of articles and newsletters addressing the anti-Communist fear in America.
Box 4 Folder 8 1955-1956
Includes publication, confidential reports on activities of the American Jewish Congress Commission on Law and Social Action; a Washington Newsletter of the Friends Committee on National Legislation
Box 4 Folder 9 1956
Includes publications and reports.
Box 4 Folder 10 1970-1971
Includes publications and minutes of Board of Directors.
Box 4 Folder 11 1972
Includes minutes and memorandums of the Board of Directors and Executive Committee and other American Civil Liberties Unions publications and memoranda.
Box 4 Folder 12 1973
Box 4 Folder 13 1974-1975
Includes minutes and memorandums of the Board of Directors, Executive Committee and various other committees including those on academic freedom, equality, and the American Civil Liberties Union Constitution. Also includes other Union reports and materials.
Box 5 Folder 1 1969-1971
Includes memorandums and minutes of the Academic Freedom Committee regarding various issues such as tenure and students' academic freedom. Also Board of Directors memorandums, Church-State Committee minutes and other Academic Freedom Committee and Union materials.
Box 5 Folder 2 1951-1959
Correspondence with American Civil Liberties Union officers including Roger N. Baldwin, American Civil Liberties Union founder; Doctor Patrick Malin, Executive Director; Alan Reitman, Assistant Director regarding various Union interests and specific requests for information on cases. Konvitz and American Civil Liberties Union political spending (July 1956-January 1957). Professor Konvitz provides a list of twelve major cases which he believes best illustrate the vindication of some of the most important United States Constitutional liberties (May 21, 1958). Also suggestions by Konvitz regarding union statements and publications. Other routine Union materials including a memorandum on the survey of civil rights in Puerto Rico (March 10, 1959), minutes, agendas and memorandums of the Academic Freedom Committee and routine correspondence with Committee officers regarding its activities.
Box 5 Folder 3 1966-1970
1966 [1968-1970]. Correspondence with Judith Follman, Executive Officer of the Academic Freedom Committee, Konvitz comments that the faculty as a body has no right to adopt a political position, that faculty have no right to cancel classes because of a university-sponsored strike, and that it is inappropriate for colleges to give students time off to participate in political campaign activity (September 21, 1970). Also includes Academic Freedom Committee memorandums, minutes, and reports and other routine Union material.
Box 5 Folder 4 1947-1971
1947-1951, 1955, 1964, 1967-1968, 1971. Correspondence from Roger Baldwin, American Civil Liberties Union founder. Baldwin praises Konvitz's book on immigration. Correspondence with Arthur Garfield Hayes, Doctor Konvitz states that he is not in favor of a statute against group defamation (September 5, 1947). Correspondence with George E. Rundquist regarding the areas in which the President of the United States may eliminate racial segregation by executive order. Konvitz believes that the President, by executive order, could prohibit racial segregation in the armed forces, but that this is the only area (May 5, 1949). Correspondence with Baldwin regarding American Civil Liberties Union request that Konvitz prepare legislation on civil rights which the American Civil Liberties Union would offer to the President's Committee on Civil Rights. Konvitz declines but refers the American Civil Liberties Union to his two books and makes several suggestions for drafting the bills (January 8, 1947). Baldwin refers to Konvitz's book as the best and only thorough study made and discusses the drafting of amendments to the federal civil rights laws for the President's commission (December 27, 1946). Konvitz also suggests that the penalties in the existing civil rights act should be considerably increased (January 17, 1947). Also includes correspondence with other American Civil Liberties Union officers including Herbert M. Levy, Staff Counsel, and Clifford Forster, Staff Council, regarding Konvitz's requests for various briefs and cases and routine publication concerns of Konvitz.
Box 5 Folder 5 1980
Routine materials.
Box 5 Folder 6 1970-1971
Routine Materials.
Box 5 Folder 7 1965-1971
Includes memorandums and minutes of various committees, working documents not for public distribution and other American Civil Liberties Union materials.
Box 5 Folder 8 1960-1969
1960, 1963-1964, 1966-1969. Minutes and miscellaneous materials of the Niagara Frontier Chapter, the Genesee Valley Chapter, and the Central New York Chapter.
Box 5 Folder 9 1966-1969
Memorandum from Doctor Konvitz to members of the Special Committee on the 1940 Resolution and the Constitution Committee. Konvitz advises against re-opening the 1940 Resolutions and makes suggestions regarding the structure of the National Committee (September 14, 1966 and March 8, 1966). Also memorandums and minutes of the Constitution Committee and the Joint Committee (Constitution Committee and Special Committee on 1940 Resolution) among more routine documents.
Box 5 Folder 10 1967-1973
Correspondence with Alan Reitman, Association Director, regarding the Pulse of Freedom, a history f five decades of civil liberties for which Konvitz authored a chapter. In correspondence with the Honorable Ramsey Clark, Chairman of the National Advisory Council, Konvitz comments that the American Civil Liberties Union should not support or oppose candidates for elective or appointive positions (March 17, 1972). Professor Konvitz also comments on the Academic Freedom Committee's proposed statement on Institutional Neutrality (August 30, 1971). Memorandums and minutes of the Board of Directors, the Executive Committee, the Constitution Committee and the Academic Freedom Committee among more routine documents.
Box 5 Folder 11 1965-1966
Miscellaneous Materials
Box 5 Folder 12 1974-1976
Continued correspondence with Alan Reitman, Associate director regarding the Pulse of freedom.
Box 6 Folder 1 1959-1971
1959 [1960-1964, 1966] 1969, 1971. Correspondence with John de J. Pemberton, Junior, Executive Director, regarding District of Columbia versus Arthur Kinoy; Doctor Konvitz provides suggestions for the brief (October 24, 1966). Also correspondence with other union officers and American Civil Liberties Union materials including activity reports, discussion of potential case at Cornell, New York Civil Liberties Union memorandums and the memorandums and minutes of various committees.
Box 6 Folder 2 1957-1972
1957, 1967, 1972
Box 6 Folder 3 1969-1970
Inside ACLU: Weekly Bulletin for National and Affiliate Leadership
Box 6 Folder 4 1965-1971
1965-1967, 1969, 1971. Correspondence with Dorothy Shields, Executive Director of the American Civil Liberties Union, New York Division. Konvitz was appointed chairman of the Ithaca Civil Liberties Committee (January 11, 1966). Konvitz suggests that rather than forming a separate Ithaca chapter that the New York State Civil Liberties Union select ten Ithaca members and establish a special committee on Ithaca interests (July 29, 1965). Also minutes of the Executive Board meetings of the Genessee Valley Chapter and the Niagara Frontier Chapter; Upstate New York membership and income by statistics; New York Civil Liberties Union legislative memoranda and by-laws; minutes of the American Civil Liberties Union Free Speech/Association Committee, Executive Committee, Communications Media Committee, and the Church-State Committee, and other routine materials
Box 6 Folder 5 1967-1971
Correspondence with Dorothy Shields, Upstate New York Division of the New York Civil Liberties Union regarding Konvitz's successful efforts to have the mayor of Ithaca issue a permit enabling a march against the Vietnam war. Konvitz talked to the marchers before they left campus urging them not to react to any provocations and arranged for a number of local attorneys to be present (May 24, 1967). Konvitz took the minutes of the May 17, 1967 meeting of the Ithaca Civil Liberties Committee, of which he was Chairman. With Shields regarding establishing an active civil liberties program in Tompkins County (establishing an Executive Committee). Konvitz mentions that the Ithaca Civil Liberties Committee would like to establish closer relations with the students and that he sees no reason why, in addition to students continuing t have their own organization, they should not also be members of the larger Tompkins county group (December 20, 1968). Letter and Constitution of the Cornell Student Chapter, New York Civil Liberties Union (February14, 1967); by-laws of the Tompkins County Chapter, New York Civil Liberties Union; New York Civil Liberties Union memorandum to Tompkins County members; minutes of the Genesee Valley Chapter, the Niagara Frontier Chapter and the Central New York Chapter; and other routine materials.
Box 6 Folder 6 1968-1970
[1968] 1970. The purpose of the Joint Committee is to prepare appropriate recommendations for American Civil Liberties Union by-law and Constitutional revisions which address structural and operational matters (memorandum of May 22, 1968). Joint Committee memorandums, copies of the American Civil Liberties Union Constitution and documents regarding decision- making structure and procedures of the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations.
Box 6 Folder 7 1965-1969
1965 [1966-1968] 1969. Various committees' documents, including a memorandum from Roger Baldwin on conscientious objection.
Box 6 Folder 8 1965-1971
1965/1970-1971. Minutes and memorandums of the Board of Directors; minutes of the Executive Committee; and other routine documents.
Box 6 Folder 9 1967-1971
Routine correspondence with the American Civil Liberties Union, the New York Civil Liberties Union, the Upstate New York Division, American Civil Liberties Union and the Niagara Frontier, Genesee Valley and Central New York Chapters.
Box 6 Folder 10 1965-1968
Box 6 Folder 11 1965-1968
1965-[1967]-1968
Box 6 Folder 12 1956-1959
Konvitz was elected as a trustee for research and education of the Academic Freedom Committee (March 15, 1957). Correspondence regarding the statement on academic freedom that Doctor Konvitz wrote and the subcommittee that he chaired that was charged to prepare a statement on academic freedom (March-May, 1958). Copies of Konvitz's March 13, 1958 draft "Why Academic Freedom is Important to Everyone." Also, memorandums, minutes, and related documents of the Board of Trustees of the Fund for Research and Education; various pamphlets on academic freedom.
Box 6 Folder 13 1973
The first edition of the American Civil Liberties Union publication "The Working Parts: An In-house Newsletter Published Periodically by the American Civil Liberties Union"
Box 6 Folder 14 1951-1959
1951-1956, 1959. Konvitz's correspondence with several Committee officers. Much of the correspondence is between Konvitz and Sol Stein, Executive Director, in the form of letters and memorandums. Their correspondence mainly concerns Committee activities and policies. Correspondence and memorandums regarding American Committee for Cultural Freedom statements about Professor Owen Lattimore; regarding American Committee for cultural Freedom projects including a proposed study of the activities of the American Communist Party in the field of civil liberties (March 5, 1956) and regarding American Committee for Cultural Freedom position toward the National Lawyers Guild (May 20, 1954). Several letters and memorandums from Konvitz. Konvitz advised the American Committee for Cultural Freedom executive committee that the American Committee for Cultural Freedom should not make any public statements about Lattimore while Lattimore's case is pending in the courts (January 17, 1955). Konvitz argues that the American Committee for Cultural Freedom should not impose any sanction on people who have cried out against "the crime" committed against Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. Konvitz agrees to serve as an advisor to a project to study the effect of the government's security and loyalty regulations and procedures upon the academic and scientific communities (July 1, 1954) and accepts membership on a Legal Commission which will act in an advisory capacity to the American Committee for Cultural Freedom (December 28, 1953). Also, Committee by-laws, confidential memorandums, memorandums, minutes, proposals, and other routine and substantive materials regarding American Committee for cultural Freedom.
Box 6 Folder 15 1947-1949
[1949]-1947. Correspondence regarding Konvitz's address to the American Council for Judaism. The file contains many detailed letters of various peoples' opinions regarding Doctor Konvitz's address and Konvitz's response to them. Most of the letters criticize or applaud Konvitz for speaking before the American Council for Judaism (ACJ) and for the content of this address. Konvitz's comments are challenged as "over-emphasizing" the threat of a clerically controlled, orthodox Israel; and for his stand with respect to Judge Rothenberg, Konvitz's replies explain his position. In correspondence with Doctor Ira Eisenstein, Association Chairman of the Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation, Incorporated, Konvitz explains his reasons for speaking at the American Council for Judaism Conference (May 3, 1949).
Box 6 Folder 16 1966-1980
1966, 1969-1980. Most of the correspondence is between Doctor Konvitz and Seymour Fishman, Executive Vice President, regarding organizational business matters. Konvitz was awarded the Morris J. Kaplun International Prize for distinguished research and scholarship established at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.
Box 6 Folder 17 1964-1969
Routine correspondence and related documents. Konvitz was a member of the Board of Directors.
Box 6 Folder 18 1947-1955
1947-1950, 1954-1955. Minutes and memorandums of the Committee on Church and State. Konvitz was a member.
Box 6 Folder 19 1968
Letter from I.L. Kenen, Executive Director, regarding Doctor Konvitz willingness to help secure support in Ithaca. (February 8, 1968)
Box 7 Folder 1 1974-1980
1974 [1976-1980]. Konvitz was a member of the International Task Force and the Task Force on Israel and American Jewish Interaction. He comments on a task force report: "Report of the Task Force on the Relationship Between Israel and the American Jewish Community," (December 5, 1977). Also included is a paper by Konvitz, "From Jewish Rights to Human Rights;" and a proposal entitled "Policy Statement on the Middle East" by the National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America (November 1980); and an American Jewish Committee memorandum regarding the proposal.
Box 7 Folder 2 1957-1964
Correspondence with Sidney Liskofsky, regarding Liskofsky's "Draft Conventions on Statelessness." Konvitz agrees with the position that Liskofsky defined and proposed as the one that should be adopted by the United States. Also correspondence with Theodore Leskes regarding their co-authored book, A Century of Civil Rights, with a Study of State Law Against Discrimination. Other routine correspondence (August 31, 1966)
Box 7 Folder 3 1965-1976
1965-1966, 1969-1976. Correspondence regarding Professor Konvitz's lecture on "The Quest for Equality and the American Jewish Experience" as part of the American Jewish Committee's Bicentennial Forum Series. Konvitz's letter to Edwin J. Lukas explaining that the Administration at Cornell has asked Konvitz to consider the problem at Cornell of five or six fraternities or sororities which are suspected to be discriminating against race or religion in their admissions policies. Correspondence regarding publications; American Jewish Committee and task force reports, and other routine correspondence and materials.
Box 7 Folder 4 1946-1953
1946-1951, 1953. Correspondence with Alfred L. Bernheim regarding Subcommittee on the Jewish University report. Doctor Konvitz expresses his dissatisfaction with the initial report and disagrees with H.L. Lurie. Konvitz believes that Jews can cooperate in establishing a secular Jewish university (January 19, 1948). Copy of H.L. Lurie's letter (January 8, 1948). Final draft of the Statement of the "Subcommittee on Jewish Universities of the Conference on Higher Education." Konvitz, William Haber, Elliot C. Cohen, Sidney Hook, and Horace M. Kallen were members of the Subcommittee. Correspondence regarding appointment of a director of a project to combat discrimination in higher education. Letter to Messieurs William Haber and James Marshall regarding the memorandum on "The Jewish University" (December 18, 1946). Konvitz comments at length on the question of establishing such a University. With Slawson, Konvitz unsuccessfully tries to secure funds from the American Jewish Committee to finance a pictorial project by photographer Roman Vishniac of Hitler's victims still in concentration camps in Europe. Konvitz comments that the American Jewish Community owes it to world Jewry to preserve an historical record in photographs of the situation in Europe and of the impact of Nazism (December 3, 1946). Correspondence with Slawson regarding publication and several drafts of Civil Rights Committee interim reports.
Box 7 Folder 5 1947-1957
1947-1949, 1950-1954, 1957. Correspondence with Haber and Marshall regarding the "Conclusions and Recommendations of the Conference on Higher Education for Jews." Konvitz suggests that the Conference communicate to the Executive Director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, who Konvitz is certain would want to cooperate with the American Jewish Committee on a program to eliminate discrimination in higher education. Correspondence with S. Andhil Fineberg regarding the American Jewish Committee's promotion of Konvitz's article on church-state relations. Correspondence with Nathan Schachner regarding the possibility of Doctor Konvitz writing some articles for magazines of national circulation. Schachner explains that the American Jewish Committee is interested in placing articles in national magazines which were written by prominent Jews and that disassociate the public's perceived relationship between Jews and Communists and between liberals and Communists. Schachner suggests that Konvitz could explain 1) that the American Jewish labor movement, especially in the garment industry, has been non-Communist and liberal in tendencies and 2) liberal thought is opposed to the totalitarianism of Communism (February 24, 1948).
Box 7 Folder 6 1973-1980
1973, 1977-[1980]. Memorandum from Konvitz to Peter I. Rose and Irving M. Levine, Staff Director, regarding the Task Force. Konvitz advises that the Task Force avoid taking stands on broad general public policy issues such as bilingual and bi-cultural education. Konvitz believes that the Task Force should formulate policies on issues which are relevant to special Jewish concerns such as religious liberty, separation of church and state and a fair and humane immigration policy (with special concern for refugees). In these areas there is a Jewish group interest and, therefore, the American Jewish Committee as a Jewish group can join others in working for a particular end (for example, a policy of aliens' protection). Konvitz believes that the American Jewish Committee has failed to formulate a policy on affirmative action that would make it very clear that the American Jewish Committee as a Jewish group is concerned with "both justice and compassion." Konvitz also discusses recent articles which he has read and his own observations tend to be more anti-Semitic than their conservative counterparts. Konvitz suggests that since American conservatives are in control of the Senate and White House, the Jewish community "might reconsider its own heavy investment in the liberal side of American politics." Other routine Task Force memorandums, copies of papers and articles on ethnicity and a paper on reverse discrimination.
Box 7 Folder 7 1975-1977
Summaries of the Steering Committee meetings of the special Task Force on Israel-American Jewry Interaction. Konvitz was a member. Proposals, routine letters, and other routine materials relating to the Task Force.
Box 7 Folder 8 1973-1978
1973-1975, 1977-1978. Routine Correspondence with various officers and American Jewish Congress documents. Of special interest is a confidential report to Congress leadership on a proposed merger between the American Jewish Congress and the American Jewish Committee.
Box 7 Folder 9 1974-1980
1974, [1977-1979]-1980. Confidential memorandum from Rabbi Henry Siegman. Executive Director to American Jewish Congress leadership. Siegman provides an account of the March 12, 1979 meeting between representatives of several major Jewish organizations and Pope John Paul II in the Apostolic Palace at the Vatican (March 21, 1979). Memorandum from Will Maslow to Konvitz answering Konvitz's request that Maslow show how the Jewish "Defense Agencies" moved from the defense of Jewish rights exclusively, to a defense of human rights generally, with particular reference to the American Jewish Congress. Maslow's response is detailed (September 6, 1974). A confidential memorandum from Howard Squadron, President, reporting on a number of meetings that he attended at the White House. A draft of a proposed Governing Council Statement on the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT II) and various resolutions on national and international issues and concerns of the Jewish Community. Other routine letters and materials.
Box 7 Folder 10 1974-1977
1974, [1976-1977]. Correspondence with Doctor Susan Gitelson regarding Konvitz's doubts about a conference on the Jewish contribution to the development of human rights. Professor Konvitz explains that such a conference will not achieve its purpose of counteracting the effect of the "Zionism is racism" resolution of the United Nations Assembly since the Arabs have stressed that they are not attacking Judaism and Jews but only Zionism and Zionists (April 14, 1976). Konvitz addressed the February 27, 1977 Governing Council session in a tribute to the 25th anniversary of "Judaism" and to its editor Robert Gordis (March 1, 1977). Also confidential minutes of the Executive Committee; minutes of the Governing Council; minutes of the Commission on Jewish Life and Culture; and various resolutions on national and international issues and on concerns of the Jewish community.
Box 7 Folder 11 1960-1966
[1960-1965]-1966. Correspondence with Will Maslow regarding Professor Norgen's memorandum on the Fair Employment Practices Commission
Box 7 Folder 12 1950-1959
Correspondence with Doctor Joachim Prinz and Isaac Toubin among others regarding routine Congress matters.
Box 7 Folder 13 1948-1957
Correspondence with Rabbi Norton M. Berman, Chairman of the National Administrative Committee of which Konvitz was a member, regarding Amendment Number 1 of the Constitution and By-laws of the Congress (June 13, 1950). Also routine correspondence and minutes
Box 7 Folder 14 1951-1957
1951-1953 [1956]-1957. Correspondence regarding Professor Konvitz's appointment to various American Jewish Congress Committees
Box 7 Folder 15 1949-1951
Correspondence with Irving Miller, President, regarding the establishment of "Judaism" and Konvitz's election as one of the fifteen American members to the General Council of the World Jewish Congress. Also correspondence on various American Jewish Congress activities in which Konvitz played a significant role.
Box 7 Folder 16 1957-1958
[1957]-1958. Correspondence with Doctor Gershon Gelbart, Executive Director. Konvitz was one of the founders of the League and a member of its Board of Directors. Private correspondence between Judge Louis E. Levinthal, chairman, and Konvitz regarding Konvitz's interest in being a member of a non-political Zionist organization (January 29 and February 8, 1957). Memorandums from Gelbart to Sponsors of the National Founding Assembly and to members of the Provisional Committee; copies of the May 1957 National Founding Assembly addresses; "Statement of Aims and Objectives;" and other routine materials and letters.
Box 7 Folder 17 1954-1962
1954-1955 [1962]. Correspondence with Eleanor g. Coit, Director, regarding Konvitz's efforts to assist the service in depositing with the Labor-Management Documentation Center of the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations.
Box 7 Folder 18 1969-1973
1969, 1971, 1973. Bulletins and routine correspondence
Box 7 Folder 19 1965-1979
Routine business correspondence regarding "The American Pragmatists" by Doctor Konvitz and Doctor Gail Kennedy.
Box 8 Folder 1 1981
Routine correspondence.
Box 8 Folder 2 1967-1980
Correspondence with Professor Allen Pollack, Secretary. Memorandum to sponsors and members of the National Executive Committee; minutes of the Executive Committee and National Council; various reports regarding the association's activities. Also, routine correspondence from officers of the association and a number of confidential preliminary reports from Pollack of the American Professors for Peace in the Middle East Study Mission to Jordan and the United Arab Republic in June 1968. Each preliminary report is in interview format and includes discussion with Arab officials such as King Hussein, Jordanian Minister of Reconstruction Hazim Nuseiba, Jordanian Minister of National Economy Hatim Zu'bi, Foreign Minister of Jordan Rifai, Prime Minister of Jordan Bahjat, Deputy Minister of Information and Chief of the Information Services and spokesman of the Government of Egypt Doctor el Zayat, Egyptian Minister of Higher Education Doctor Shukeir, Jordanian Minister of Health Doctor Amad Amar, Roman Catholic Bishop of the East Bank Nehmeh Simaan, a group described as "Intellectuals of the Commandos," Amman, other Jordanian and American officials, persons associated with Arabic publications, and former commander of United Nations Forces in Gaza, General I. J. Rikhye.
Box 8 Folder 3 1967-1980
Correspondence with Professor Allen Pollack, Secretary. Memorandum to sponsors and members of the National Executive Committee; minutes of the Executive Committee and National Council; various reports regarding the association's activities. Also, routine correspondence from officers of the association and a number of confidential preliminary reports from Pollack of the American Professors for Peace in the Middle East Study Mission to Jordan and the United Arab Republic in June 1968. Each preliminary report is in interview format and includes discussion with Arab officials such as King Hussein, Jordanian Minister of Reconstruction Hazim Nuseiba, Jordanian Minister of National Economy Hatim Zu'bi, Foreign Minister of Jordan Rifai, Prime Minister of Jordan Bahjat, Deputy Minister of Information and Chief of the Information Services and spokesman of the Government of Egypt Doctor el Zayat, Egyptian Minister of Higher Education Doctor Shukeir, Jordanian Minister of Health Doctor Amad Amar, Roman Catholic Bishop of the East Bank Nehmeh Simaan, a group described as "Intellectuals of the Commandos," Amman, other Jordanian and American officials, persons associated with Arabic publications, and former commander of United Nations Forces in Gaza, General I. J. Rikhye.
Box 8 Folder 4 1967
Routine Correspondence and Documents
Box 8 Folder 5 1951
Letter from Konvitz to Eugene W. DuFlocq regarding the proposed revision of "The American Story," (December 5, 1951). Memorandum to Konvitz from M.P. Catherwood concerning the project (December 1, 1951).
Box 8 Folder 6 1952
Routine correspondence
Box 8 Folder 7 1956-1962
1956-1958, 1961-1962. Correspondence with Joanne Stern Yaron of the Department of Information who requested a copy of Professor Konvitz's lecture on the Eichmann case (February 14, 1961). Correspondence regarding Cornell and Ithaca activities with Henry Seigman, Coordinator of Campus activities, the Council in which Konvitz participated.
Box 8 Folder 8 1970-1975
1970-1972, 1974-1975. Correspondence with Rabbi Israel Miller, American Zionist Federation President, regarding Konvitz's participation in Federation activities. Also minutes of the Executive Committee and National Board meetings, financial information and other routine American Zionist Federation materials.
Box 8 Folder 9 1969-1978
1969-1972, 1978. Routine materials of the American Section of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy of which Konvitz was a member.
Box 8 Folder 10 1966-1968
Correspondence with Professor Bertram M. Gross, Department of Political Science of the Maxwell Graduate School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University, regarding the publication of a special issue of The Annals entitled "Social Goals and Indicators for a Great Society." In a confidential letter to Konvitz, Gross explains the purpose of this edition and asks Konvitz to contribute a chapter on civil liberties. This edition is intended to serve as an unofficial document which would deal with the major subject matter areas that might be included in a Special Report of the President. Such a Special Report would be used to supplement the President's "State of the Union Message" by considering many "quality of life" subjects only barely touched on, if at all, by the Economic Report and the Budget Message. Konvitz responds that, although he had not wanted to accept any new commitments, he would like to participate in the project (April 14, 1966). Other correspondence regarding meetings with Gross and sessions with authors of other chapters to discuss their work. Routine correspondence with James C. Charlesworth, President of the American Academy of the Political and Social Science, and with Thorsten Sellin, Editor of The Annals.
Box 8 Folder 11 1959-1970
1959, 1968, 1970. Correspondence with Professor Hannah Arendt, the Department of Philosophy of the New School for Social Research, regarding the future of the Jewish Social Studies and the appointment of an editor and associate editors for the magazine (April-May 1966). Also personal correspondence.
Box 8 Folder 12 1947-1957
Correspondence with Doctor Max Ascoli, editor of the Reporter, regarding publication of books and articles by Konvitz and other scholars; regarding The Reporter; regarding contributions of the Max Ascoli Fund, Incorporated. Also personal correspondence.
Box 8 Folder 13 1966-1975
1966-1968, 1970-1971, 1973, 1975. Doctor Konvitz was a member of the Committee on Teaching Law Outside of Law School. Correspondence and information regarding the Committee including memorandums, reports, and letters. Correspondence with various Association of American Law Schools officers. Association of American Law Schools papers, bulletins, analyses of cases, memorandums, and other routine materials.
Box 8 Folder 14 1961-1966
1961-[1964-1966]. Analysis by Konvitz of United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America (UAW), American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations Local 283 versus Rossell Scofield (November 18, 1965). Dean Vernon X. Miller, Executive Committee President, and Michael H. Cardozo, Executive Director, asked Konvitz to act as an Association of American Law Schools representative to accompany an evaluation team being sent by the Middle States Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools to the University of Puerto Rico. Professor Konvitz also was representing the Middle States Association under the heading "Instruction and Research," (October 19, 1965). Konvitz was a member of a special Advisory Committee on Supreme Court Decisions. Analysis by Konvitz of the case of Abernathy versus Alabama prepared for the Special Committee on Supreme Court Decisions (September 25, 1964). Other routine correspondence with Association of American Law Schools officers, analyses of cases prepared for the Supreme Court Decisions Committee, memorandums and routine Association of American Law Schools publications.
Box 8 Folder 15 1946-1959
Correspondence with Professor Salo W. Baron, Department of History, Columbia University; Konvitz explains his position on sanctions against group libel (September 17, 1947). Correspondence with John E. Bebout, National Municipal League Assistant Secretary, regarding Konvitz's suggestions about provisions concerning civil rights and rights of labor for the revised New Jersey constitution (May 1947) and personal correspondence with Konvitz (November 1946-January 1947). Correspondence with Clarence H. Briscoe, Justice of the New York Supreme Court. Briscoe comments that Konvitz's address on Brandeis was the finest he had ever heard (June 29, 1959). Correspondence with Doctor Joshua Bloch, Chief Jewish Division of the New York Public Library regarding the literary works of Konvitz's grandfather and father. Konvitz sent Bloch his copy of his grandfather's book, Bet Ridvas, which Bloch had microfilmed (January 22, 1954). Letter to Herbert Brownell, Junior, United States Attorney General regarding Konvitz's concern that persons who may have contributed to a defense fund on Val Lorwin's behalf would be blacklisted by government agencies making it impossible for them to get a job with or research funds from the Federal Government. Konvitz discusses his belief in American judicial institutions and support for defense funds (May 27, 1954). Letter from Carol Schoen, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, informing Konvitz that Professor Martin Buber would like to arrange a meeting with him (November 9, 1951). Routine personal correspondence.
Box 8 Folder 16 1966-1981
1966 [1969-1981]. Correspondence with Professor Paul H. Baris, Bar-Ilan University. Doctor Konvitz mentions that because of the revolutionary government's activities in Liberia he decided to close out the Liberian codification Project (June 10, 1980). Correspondence with Catherine Barnes, a Ph.D. candidate in American History at Columbia University, regarding information relating to desegregation of railroad and bus transportation from 1935 to 1963. Barnes contacted Konvitz because of his work as Assistant General Counsel of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Legal Defense and Educational Fund. Konvitz answers several questions about the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peoples' work in this area in the early 1940s (April 13, 1977). Correspondence with Professor Salo Baron, Center of Israel and Jewish Studies, Columbia University, regarding the journal Jewish Social Studies (1971-1974). Routine correspondence with Marver H. Bernstein, President of Brandeis University. Routine personal correspondence with Herbert Bienstock, Regional Commissioner of Labor Statistics, Bureau of Labor Statistics, United States Department of Labor (1975, 1979-1980). Correspondence with William M. Birenbaum, President of Antioch University and formerly President of Staten Island Community College of the City University of New York, regarding affairs at both institutions. Routine personal correspondence, reports, and materials concerning both schools, and a copy of a letter from Horace Kallen to Birenbaum regarding Birenbaum's Testimony on Community Colleges (March 28, 1973).
Box 8 Folder 17 1953-1963
1953-1955, 1957-1958, 1960, 1962-1963. Correspondence with Doctor Sidney Barnett, Chairman of Social Studies at the New York City High School of Music and Art, regarding Konvitz's writing a high school edition of the Bill of Rights Reader.
Box 8 Folder 18 1985
Correspondence on literary matters
Box 8 Folder 19 1947-1961
1947-1952, 1954-1958, 1961. Personal correspondence with Madison C. Bates, Professor Emeritus of English at Rutgers University and former dean of its Newark College of Arts and Sciences regarding literary interests.
Box 8 Folder 20 1970-1979
1970-1975, 1977-1979. Correspondence with Aharon Becker, Secretary- General of the Histadrut. Correspondence between 1970 and 1977 regarding their unsuccessful attempts to secure the support of a publishing company in a project to write an International Encyclopedia of Labor and Industrial Relations. Doctor Konvitz had been on the editorial board. Other routine and personal correspondence.
Box 8 Folder 21 1979-1980
Box 8 Folder 22
No date. Routine personal correspondence with Doctor Nathan Belfer, International Ladies' Garment Workers Union Assistant Research Director.
Box 8 Folder 23 1947-1956
1947-1948, 1051, 1956. Correspondence with Elenor Davidson Berman regarding the Conference on Methods in Philosophy and the Sciences, of which Konvitz was a member. Also Konvitz asks Berman to consider supporting a proposal by a group of Cornell students who are interested in establishing at Cornell a house which is open to all students regardless of race or religion (December 19, 1947).
Box 8 Folder 24 1967-1978
1967-1969, 1971-1973, 1978. Correspondence with officers of the Cornell University Press regarding the 3rd, 4th, and 5th editions of Konvitz's Bill of Rights Reader; various materials and letters regarding the book's publication, promotion, and sale.
Box 8 Folder 25 1947-1951
Correspondence with Doctor Jacob Billikopf, board member of the New School for Social Research, chairman of the executive board of Howard University. Copy of a letter from Billikopf to Irene DuPont of the DuPont Company regarding a comment by DuPont concerning an alliance between Communists and some Jews. Billikopf describes a substantial contribution by the DuPonts in 1917-1918 to the American Jewish Relief Committee (July 21, 1950). Professor Konvitz comments on the reaction to his Chicago address of the Yiddish Press and American Zionists. Konvitz's speech was received with hostility from these groups and although some people privately expressed agreement with Konvitz's concern about the problem of freedom in Israel, no one has spoken on his behalf; and the central issues that Konvitz discussed have been neglected (May 6, 1949). Konvitz discusses his disagreement with Goodenough regarding Wolfson's Philo (October 12, 1948). Konvitz comments that he approves "with all my heart" Billikopf's letter in the Times regarding the appeal for funds by Negro colleges. Konvitz also mentions that few decisions he has had to make were more difficult than his decision not to accept a position on the Howard Law School faculty (April 9, 1948). Also correspondence regarding their common activities and interests in matters relating to Horace Kallen and the New School for Social Research. Correspondence regarding publications and exchanging ideas on scholarly matters. Personal correspondence.
Box 9 Folder 1 1961-1981
1961, 1967, 1969-1981. Correspondence with Reverend Professor T. A. Burkill, Head of the Department of Theology at the University of Rhodesia regarding Konvitz's contribution to a proposed collective work, Myth and the Scientific Mind. Copy of a letter to Doctor Konvitz from United States Supreme Court Justice Hugo L. Black. Black compliments Konvitz on his Fundamental Liberties of a Free People and Bill of Rights Reader. Black emphasizes the importance of Konvitz continuing to write about basic constitutional liberties (March 9, 1961). Personal correspondence with Clarence H. Briscoe, retired New York State Supreme Court justice. Correspondence with Professor G. Sidney Buchanan, Bates College of Law, University of Houston regarding Buchanan's book on the Thirteenth Amendment. Letters to Konvitz from United States Senator James L. Buckley regarding Konvitz's suggestions concerning copyright legislation and the photocopying of published materials (august 4 and 8, 1975). Other routine and personal correspondence with colleagues and friends.
Box 9 Folder 2 1951-1956
Correspondence with Doctor Algernon D. Black, Chairman of the Society for Ethical Culture and Education Director of the Encampment for Citizenship. Correspondence regarding the activities of the Encampment and Konvitz's participation at Encampment meetings and conferences; and copies of recommendations written for Black by Konvitz.
Box 9 Folder 3 1946-1953
1946-1948, 1950, 1953. Correspondence with Ida Blacksin, Ph.D. candidate at New York University.
Box 9 Folder 4 1964-1966
[1964-1966] 1964-1965. Correspondence with Rabbi Benjamin M. Kahn, B'nai B'rith Hillel Commission National Director, regarding Professor Konvitz's address at the Academic Convocation held at Harvard University (March 16, 1964). Correspondence with the Chairman and with the Director of the Commission on Adult Jewish Education. Konvitz was a member of the Commission and was on its Publication Committee. Also memorandums, minutes, agendas, and reports.
Box 9 Folder 5 1969-1980
1969, 1972-1980. Correspondence with Rabbi William D. Rudolph. Konvitz responds to questions regarding the definition of a Jewish book and the characteristics of Jewish writers. Konvitz was chairman of its Commission on Formal Jewish Studies in Higher Education. Correspondence regarding lectures and publications by Konvitz. Routine correspondence and materials regarding B'nai B'rith activities and programs.
Box 9 Folder 6 1955-1960
Correspondence with Lily Edelman, Editorial Associate of the B'nai B'rith Department of Adult Jewish Education, regarding comments of readers on Konvitz's Brandeis manuscript (April 7 and 15, 1959). Konvitz was a member of the Executive, Personnel, Program, and Publications Committees of the National Hillel Commission. Correspondence with Doctor Judah Shapiro, National Director of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation regarding B'nai B'rith personnel codes and policies (January 13, 1959). Also descriptions of Konvitz's lectures for the two Institutes on "The Enduring Heritage" and "Judaism and Christianity" - July 16-23, 1958; and at B'nai B'rith Institutes of Judaism - June 30-July 4, 1955. Other routine correspondence regarding Konvitz's lectures and publications; and regarding B'nai B'rith programs, activities, and committees.
Box 9 Folder 7 1966-1969
Routine correspondence with various Hillel officers regarding programs, activities and policies. Confidential minutes of meetings of the Executive and Personnel Committees; memorandums to Hillel Commission members; various reports; budget information; and other routine materials.
Box 9 Folder 8 1948-1958
1948, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1955 [1956-1958]. Konvitz was a member of the Special Committee on Survey and Evaluation. Copy of an October 6, 1957 memorandum from Konvitz to the Committee on Survey and Evaluation containing detailed suggestions by Konvitz regarding various aspects of Hillel activities and concerns on campuses. Correspondence with Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld, National Director, regarding Professor Konvitz's manuscript on "Judaism and the Pursuit of Happiness" (February 1, 1956). Correspondence with Doctor Judah J. Shapiro, Hillel Foundation in which Konvitz comments at length on the nature of the Jewish experience in America (August 6, 1956). Konvitz comments to Lelyveld o the critical importance of Hillel on American college and university campuses (March 12, 1956). Also correspondence with Hillel officers regarding activities, programs, and policies; memorandums and minutes of the Committee on Survey and Evaluation; memorandums and minutes of the Executive Committee and National Hillel Commission. Also reports and other routine materials.
Box 9 Folder 9 1951-1952
Correspondence with various people including Dean Martin P. Catherwood, Doctor Emerson Day and Mrs. Edmund Ezra Day; also copies of letters from Catherwood to Deane W. Malott, President of Cornell University, and to T.P. Wright, Acting President of Cornell. All correspondence regarding the publication of a book of Doctor Edmund Ezra Day's public addresses and articles. Konvitz compiled and edited the documents. Other related materials.
Box 9 Folder 10 1962-1968
[1962] 1964, 1966, 1968. Correspondence with people in various organizations including the American Jewish Committee, the American Jewish Congress, the Anti-Defamation League, the National Conference of Christians and Jews, and the National Community Relations Advisory Council, regarding Doctor Konvitz's request for information about these organizations and their activities in this field of intergroup relations. Konvitz requested this information in order to write a chapter on intergroup relations for a Jewish Publication Society book on The American Jew.
Box 9 Folder 11 1946-1948
Box 9 Folder 12 1958
Box 9 Folder 13 1954-1956
Box 9 Folder 14
No date
Box 9 Folder 15 1946-1948
Book reviews of Konvitz's The Constitution and Civil Rights. Listings of book reviews of The Constitution and Civil Rights for December 1946-September 15, 1947 and for May 1947-November 1948 on file at Columbia University Press. Konvitz was awarded the 1947 Chicago Honor Award by the Chicago Council Against Racial and Religious Discrimination for this book (January 15, 1948).
Box 9 Folder 16 1948-1950
Box 9 Folder 17 1947-1949
Box 9 Folder 18 1957-1959
Box 9 Folder 19 1955
Box 9 Folder 20 1947-1948
Book reviews of Konvitz's On the Nature of Value. Listings of reviews on file at Columbia University Press February 1946-October 15, 1950.
Box 9 Folder 21 1955-1956
Correspondence with publishers regarding Konvitz's Fundamental Liberties of a Free People: Religion, Speech, Press, Assembly. Also personal correspondence with various people regarding the May 1, 1955 New York Times article about Konvitz's fellowship to study the Bill of Rights.
Box 9 Folder 22 1953-1965
[sent to Press: December 2, 1953] 1953-1956, 1959-1965. Correspondence with Albert Harkness, Junior, Director of the United States Information Agency, regarding the Spanish translation of Konvitz's Bill of Rights Reader, The Constitution and Civil Rights, and Fundamental Liberties of a Free People (November-December 1959). Correspondence with various people and publishers regarding the possibility that Doctor Konvitz write an abridged edition of the book for use in high schools. Correspondence with Professor Glendon A. Schubert, Junior, Michigan State College Department of Political Science, regarding an editorial introductory note in Konvitz's book (March 9, 1955). Correspondence with Lyle Tatum, Central committee for Conscientious Objectors, regarding Konvitz's omission of conscientious objector cases (February 17, 1955). Correspondence with Arthur T. Vanderbilt, complimenting Konvitz on his book (September 14, 1954). Correspondence with various people and organizations relating to the book.
Box 9 Folder 23 1947-1969
1947, 1959-1963, 1969. Correspondence regarding the reprint of Law and Social Action: Selected Essays of the Alexander H. Pekelis, edited by Professor Konvitz (March-May 1969). Other correspondence with Cornell University Press regarding routine publication matters.
Box 9 Folder 24 1963-1964
Box 9 Folder 25 1963-1966
Correspondence with Professor Daniel J. Boorstin, Department of History at the University of Chicago, regarding Konvitz's contribution to An American Treasury of Living Documents and to An American Primer. Doctor Konvitz provides substantive suggestions for the Living Documents book (December 31, 1963). Copy of a paper "The Bill of Rights" by Konvitz. Other routine correspondence.
Box 9 Folder 26 1946-1959
1946-1949, 1958-1959. Correspondence with Professor Phillips Bradley, Institute of Industrial and Labor Relations at the University of Illinois, regarding information about courses and routine personal matters.
Box 9 Folder 27 1972-1977
1972-1974, 1976-1977. Correspondence with Doctor Shlomo Bardin, Executive Director and founder regarding Institute concerns and activities. Bardin mentions that to his knowledge Konvitz is the only individual who has received an honorary degree from academic institutions of all three Jewish denominations (June 19, 1972). Other related materials and personal correspondence
Box 9 Folder 28 1965-1978
1965, 1969, 1970-1971, 1973-1974, 1978. Correspondence with Doctor Marver H. Bernstein, President, regarding grants with Doctor Norman Greenwald regarding a proposal for an American College in Jerusalem. Konvitz comments on the advantages of an American University that is closely associated with Hebrew University (April 22, 1965). Other routine materials including memorandums and newsletters regarding policies, programs, and activities at Brandeis.
Box 9 Folder 29 1986
Box 9 Folder 30 1948-1960
1948-1949, 1951-1954, 1956, 1960. Correspondence with Asher Brynes, Director of Speechwriters Bureau of the Republican National Committee. Correspondence regarding personal matters as well as detailed discussions on religion, discrimination, and other significant issues of the time.
Box 9 Folder 31 1948-1950
Letter to Mister H. Cole, director of the Education Division; Konvitz explains that in teaching labor law he believes that it is more important to emphasize principles and general trends and not the details of day-to-day decisions because of the unstable nature of labor law (January 3, 1950). Routine correspondence and labor law, labor relations, and collective bargaining materials from the Bureau of National Affairs.
Box 10 Folder 1 1947-1959
1947-1956, 1959. Correspondence with Mister Huntington Cairns, Counsel to the National Gallery of Art, regarding Konvitz's proposal to the Fund for the Republic to establish a Civil Liberties Institute at Cornell University. An exchange with Professor Robert K. Carr, Department of Government at Dartmouth College and Executive Secretary of the President's Committee on Civil Rights. Konvitz was a member of a panel of lawyers who examined and proposed civil rights bills which were prepared for the President's committee (April 2, 1947). Konvitz comments on memoranda regarding civil rights bills (April 16, 1947) and other routine correspondence. Correspondence with Hodding Carter, Editor and Publisher of the Delta Democrat - Times, regarding activities and the nature of White Citizens' Councils, the Klu Klux Klan (KKK), and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and regarding integration (October-December 1956). Correspondence with Professor Roy B. Chamberlin, Chapel Director and Fellow in Religion at Dartmouth College, regarding the Immaculate Conception (April 1951). Correspondence with Professor W.M. Cochrane, Assistant Director of the Institute of Government, regarding clarification of a statement in Konvitz's book, The Constitution and Civil Rights (September 1947). Correspondence with Professor Julius Cohen, University of Nebraska Law School, regarding Julius's article "Ascertaining the Moral Sense of the Community" (March 7, 1956). Correspondence with Lyle Tatum, Central committee for Conscientious Objectors. Konvitz agrees to serve on a national Panel of attorneys in conscientious objector cases (February 11, 1952). Konvitz cosigned a letter to President Truman from the Central Committee for Conscientious Objectors requesting him to free imprisoned conscientious objectors (September 14, 1949). Correspondence with other persons regarding various scholarly issues, publications and personal matters.
Box 10 Folder 2 1966-1981
1966-1969, 1971-1981. Correspondence with Professor Gerald Caplan, M.D., Director of the Laboratory of Community Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School regarding a critique of the Quaker Report, "Search for Peace in the Middle East." Konvitz provides extensive detailed comments on the critique of the Quaker Report (May 3, 1971). Correspondence with Rabbi Doctor Alexander Carlebach, English Editor of Niv Hamidrashia, regarding relationships among religious establishments in Israel (October 1977) and matters regarding the journal. Correspondence with Professor David F. Cavers regarding Konvitz's research at the Princeton Institute for Advance Study (1959-1960). In correspondence with Robert L. Cohen, Professor Konvitz comments that the American idea of separation of church and state has universal validity and no exception should be made for Israel (September 24, 1971). Also routine correspondence regarding personal and other publication matters.
Box 10 Folder 3 1959-1964
1959, 1962-1964. Personal correspondence with Doctor Robert K. Carr, President of Oberlin College (March 24, 1960). Correspondence with Clifford P. Case, United States Senator, regarding the Senator's bill to establish a commission on Congressional Reorganization (March 15, 1963). Correspondence with M.P. Catherwood, New York State Department of Labor Industrial Commissioner, in which Catherwood provides a detailed explanation of the reason Ives chose Cornell University as the site of the Industrial and Labor Relations School (December 6, 1962). Other routine correspondence with Catherwood. Correspondence with Reverend John B. Sheerin, Editor of The Catholic World, regarding routine publication matters. Also correspondence with Sheerin regarding Konvitz's talk on "The Meaning of 'Religion' as Reflected in Supreme Court Decisions" at the Paulists Fathers May 16, 1963 First Amendment Conference.
Box 10 Folder 4 1956-1957
Copy of the Interim Report of the Cornell Labor Law Project "Damage Actions against Unions" (April 17, 1956). Business Week article "Do Suits Threaten Unions?" which describes Konvitz's labor law research project on sits against unions for damages (January 17, 1957)
Box 10 Folder 5 1955-1959
Correspondence with various people including Arthur J. Goldberg, General Counsel to the Industrial Union Department, American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations and United Steelworkers of America; Dean Catherwood; William J. Isaacson, Counsel to Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America; and Will Shafroth, Chief of the Division of Procedural Studies for the Administrative Office of the United States Courts, regarding the labor law research project on damage suits against unions. Also correspondence with several attorneys who provided information about cases they handled involving suits for damages brought against unions by employers, employees, or third parties. Correspondence with researchers and other persons regarding various aspects of the project and clippings.
Box 10 Folder 6 1948-1967
1948-1952, 1954-1956, 1959, 1961-1964, 1967. Correspondence with Professor Edmond Cahn, New York University School of Law, on law school teaching techniques (March 21, 1962). Other routine correspondence.
Box 10 Folder 7 1962
Correspondence relating to Konvitz's role as Chairman of the Necrology Committee
Box 10 Folder 8 1954-1959
1954-1955, 1957-1959
Box 10 Folder 9 1971-1974
Correspondence with Michael H. Cardozo, Executive Director of the Association of American Law Schools on summary memoranda that Konvitz wrote pending Supreme Court cases as well as regarding particular Supreme Court cases. A confidential letter from Konvitz regarding the plans of Doctor Bernard Lander and Doctor Aaron Schreiber, of Touro College, to establish a law school.
Box 10 Folder 10 1966
Box 10 Folder 11 1976-1980
1976-1977, 1979, 1980. Correspondence with Doctor Alan F. Westin, Editor of The Civil Liberties Review, in which Konvitz provides a list of what he considers the ten most important books since 1944 on civil rights (June 10, 1977). Correspondence with Professor Abraham D. Sofear, Columbia University School of Law and Director of the War Powers Study. Sofear requests Konvitz's suggestions for a new Director of the Study. Enclosed with Sofear's letter are descriptive materials about the project (January 23, 1979). November 9, 1963. The New Yorker article on the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions.
Box 10 Folder 12 1973-1979
1973-1975, 1977-1979. Routine correspondence with Doctor Preston S. Cutler, Associate Director, and others.
Box 10 Folder 13 1964-1965
Correspondence with Doctor Ralph W. Tyler, Director, regarding various matters largely having to do with nine months he spent at the Center, and including his work on Expanding Liberty: Freedom's Gains Since World War II (June 11, 1965). Other routine correspondence and materials regarding Konvitz's year at the center.
Box 10 Folder 14 1957-1980
1957, 1961-1975, 1977-1980. Correspondence from Columbia University Press regarding A Century of Civil Rights. Book reviews and other related correspondence and materials.
Box 10 Folder 15 1947-1962
Box 10 Folder 16 1961-1965
Box 10 Folder 17 1952
1952, 195601957, 1964. Correspondence with Zechariah Chafee, III relating to his father. Correspondence with Professor Zechariah Chafee, Junior, Harvard Law School regarding papers and other scholarly and academic matters. Letters and marginal notes by Chafee on Konvitz's chapter on "The Adoption of the Bill of Rights." Other scholarly correspondence regarding Doctor Konvitz's book on First Amendment freedoms. Letter from Konvitz in which he explains how his course in "The Development of American Ideals" is organized (January 2, 1952).
Box 10 Folder 18 1961
1957, 1960-1962. Correspondence with the Executive Directors of Civil Liberties Educational Foundation regarding an annotated civil and political rights bibliography for high school students. Konvitz was a member of Civil Liberties Educational Foundation National Study Group to improve the teaching of the Bill of Rights (July 20, 1961).
Box 10 Folder 19 1956-1959
1956, 1959. Correspondence with several people including Dean Catherwood and Louis G. Silverberg, Director of Information of the National Labor Relations Board, regarding the establishment of the proposed Cyrus S. Ching Fund at Cornel. The income from the fund was to be distributed to Industrial and Labor Relations graduate students with selection based on academic promise or performance, financial need or research ability. List of contributors to the fund.
Box 10 Folder 20 1966-1980
1966, 1970-1971, 1973-1980. Letter to Konvitz from Grenville Clark in which he comments on the United Nations. Other routine reports and letters of the Grenville Clark Fund.
Box 10 Folder 21 1946-1959
1946-1952, 1954-1959. Correspondence with several editors especially Elliot Cohen, of Commentary: A Jewish Review. Detailed and lengthy discussions between Konvitz and Commentary staff regarding publications by Konvitz and several other authors. Critical, substantive comments by Konvitz on articles and book reviews. Copies of Konvitz's letters to the editors of Commentary; some letters are in response to those written by readers in reaction to Konvitz's articles - a wide range of subjects are touched upon in relation to pieces being reviewed or considered for publication.
Box 10 Folder 22 1946-1950
1946-1947, 1949-1950. Correspondence with Mister Frank Cohen. A series of letters from Cohen mailed to American Zionists to convey his first-hand impression of Palestine, and raise many primary issues regarding American Jews' relation with Palestine. The letters provide much detail regarding the conditions in Palestine during the 1940s, the economic and political problems in Palestine, and the issues confronting American Zionists which needed to be resolved in regard to their aid to Jews in Palestine. Konvitz responds positively to some of the issues raised by Cohen. Also personal correspondence.
Box 10 Folder 23 1946-1959
1946-1956, 1958-1959. Correspondence with Lucy Cohen regarding Konvitz's efforts to get Ethical Systems and Legal Ideals by her deceased husband reprinted. Doctor Konvitz wrote the prefatory note to the reprinted edition. Also correspondence with Lucy Cohen regarding other works by Cohen and personal matters. Most of the correspondence in the folder is with Doctor Felix S. Cohen, Ex-Associate Solicitor of the Interior Department. There is a great deal of detailed correspondence between Konvitz and Cohen regarding arrangements to complete several chapters of Professor Morris R. Cohen's (Felix Cohen's deceased father's) unfinished manuscript The Development of American Thought and regarding personal matters.
Box 10 Folder 24 1960-1964
[1960- ] 1960-1961, 1964. Correspondence with Lucy Cohen about The Legal Conscience by Felix S. Cohen. Konvitz wrote a review of the book for the January 1961 Columbia Law Review. Also personal correspondence.
Box 10 Folder 25 1967-1979
1967, 1970-1979. Correspondence with Justice Haim Cohn, the Supreme Court of Israel regarding scholarly and personal matters. The correspondence includes detailed information about the work and scholarly interests of both men. Konvitz and Cohen discuss Spinoza and Maimonides in several letters. Also correspondence on the subject of imprisonment from both biblical and practical perspectives. Also discussion on the intellectual activities of both men.
Box 11 Folder 1 1949-1950
Personal correspondence with Doctor David H. Colin, New York University Department of economics, regarding the publication of Colin's manuscript on unemployment insurance in New York.
Box 11 Folder 2 1956-1957
Correspondence with William T. Couch, Editor-in-Chief regarding the preparation of articles by Konvitz on Civil Rights and Civil Liberties for the 1957 Collier's Encyclopedia Year Book
Box 11 Folder 3 1972-1976
Correspondence with Professor Alan F. Westin, Editor of The Civil Liberties Review, regarding periodical and personal matters; and letters with reference to the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties. Columbia University and Teachers College (1965 and 1968)
Box 11 Folder 4 1956-1966
1956-1957, 1960-1966. Correspondence with Doctor Harold Weisberg, Chairman of the B'nai B'rith Commission on Adult Jewish Education. Professor Konvitz agrees to serve on the Commission's Advisory Board (May 23, 1966). Correspondence with John Conyers, Junior, United States House of Representatives Committee on Judiciary regarding the nomination of J.P. Coleman to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals (July 26, 1965). Correspondence with Samuel Caplan, Editor of Congress Weekly, on Konvitz's article and press release concerning the stoning of a church in Jerusalem. Correspondence with Robert E. Cushman, National Historical Publications Commission, on academic and personal matters.
Box 11 Folder 5 1958-1975
1958-1960, 1963, 1974-1975. Correspondence with Gordon M. Tiffany, Staff Director, with enclosures relating to Konvitz's plans to attend the Commission's hearings on housing in New York City as a member of the New York State Advisory Committee (January 7, 1959). In a memorandum to President Malott, Provost Atwood, Dean Catherwood, and Dean Thoron, Konvitz informs them of his appointment to the New York State Advisory Committee of the Federal Commission on Civil Rights and that the New Jersey State Civil Rights Commission has approved the report that Konvitz drafted as the chairman of the State commission that investigated administrative and enforcement procedures under the New Jersey Fair Employment Practice and Civil Rights Acts (November 20, 1958). Letter from Senator Thomas C. Hennings, Junior, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Constitutional Rights, asking Konvitz for a statement of his views regarding legal or constitutional questions or problems that are raised by present-day methods and uses of wiretapping and eavesdropping. Hennings comments that with Konvitz's permission the statement would probably be incorporated into the record of future wiretapping and eavesdropping hearings (October 2, 1958). Also routine correspondence from the New York State Advisory Committee of the Federal Civil Rights commission on which Konvitz served.
Box 11 Folder 6 1947
Minutes of the June 4, 1947 annual meeting of the Commission of which Konvitz was a member
Box 11 Folder 7 1972-1974
In letters to the editors of Judaism and Commentary, Doctor Konvitz explains that he accepted the chairmanship of a Commission on Formal University Jewish Studies Programs that was appointed by Doctor Nahum Goldmann, Chairman of the Memorial Foundation for Jewish Culture. The Memorial Foundation appointed the Commission because it had decided to contribute a substantial amount of money each year to help establish and develop Jewish Studies Programs in colleges and universities. Konvitz prepared the report which was subsequently adopted by the Board of Directors of the Memorial Foundation.
Box 11 Folder 8 1955
Copies of letters that Konvitz sent to Simon E. Sobeloff, Solicitor General of the Department of Justice, and to Dean Irving M. Ives regarding Konvitz's possible appointment to the Commission on Government Security (August 15, 1955)
Box 11 Folder 9 1964
Konvitz agrees to serve on the Association of American Law Schools Committee on Supreme Court Decisions (February 26, 1964).
Box 11 Folder 10 1948-1949
Correspondence regarding Konvitz's speaking engagement for the committee
Box 11 Folder 11 1946-1987
1946-1951 [1987]. Correspondence with M. Margaret Anderson, editor of Common Ground, published by the Common Council for American Unity. Doctor Konvitz wrote a column titled "The Pursuit of Liberty" for several issues in which he discussed important civil liberties cases and placed the development in civil liberties in the context of American jurisprudence (December 20, 1948). Correspondence with Read Lewis, Executive Director of the Common Council. Konvitz provides detailed comments on a draft outline on the prevention of discrimination and the protection of minorities prepared for the United Nations Commission on Human Rights (October 27, 1948). Other correspondence with Anderson regarding substantive concerns about Konvitz's department (for example, what should be covered) and about the periodical.
Box 11 Folder 12 1956-1957
Correspondence with Sylvia B. Gottleib, Research Department Director regarding the establishment of a grant or fellowship at Cornell for the support of graduate research on the telephone industries in the United States and Canada
Box 11 Folder 13 1960-1964
[1960- ] 1961- 1964. Routine correspondence with various officers of the conference regarding Konvitz's evaluation of applicants for scholarships
Box 11 Folder 14 1954-1959
Correspondence with Doctor Judah J. Shapiro, Department of Cultural and Educational Reconstruction and other officers regarding Konvitz's evaluation of applicants for the scholarships. Also correspondence with Shapiro regarding religious issues and Cornell faculty appointments and Shapiro's response to Konvitz's comments about Shapiro's view of Judaism (September 12, 1956).
Box 11 Folder 15 1946-1953
1946-1947, 1949, 1953. Correspondence on the Conference on Methods in Philosophy and the Sciences in which Konvitz was involved as Secretary-Treasurer (1945 ad 1946) and as a member of the Executive Committee (1944-1945 and 1946-1947).
Box 11 Folder 16 1947-1948
Box 11 Folder 17 1948-1949
Correspondence with Thomas M. Cooley II, a Washington, District of Columbia attorney regarding a memorandum by Cooley in the Kaminer case. Konvitz comments on Cooley's memorandum. Also detailed correspondence between Konvitz and Cooley regarding the latter's review of Doctor Konvitz's book, The Alien and the Asiatic in American Law, in the November 1947 Columbia Law Review.
Box 11 Folder 18 1947-1948
Correspondence with Johnson E. Fairchild, Head of the Division of Social Philosophy at Cooper Union, regarding Konvitz's talk on "The Multidimensionality of History" for the Cooper Union Forum Sunday Series of 1948-1949
Box 11 Folder 19 1946-1961
1946-1948, 1952-1953, 1957-1961. Correspondence with Doctor Hayse Cooperman regarding personal matters.
Box 11 Folder 20 1947
Box 11 Folder 21 1963-1972
Press releases: copy of 1963 letter from Konvitz to Mister e. Harremoes, regarding the council of Europe establishing Cornell University Libraries as one of its depositories in the United States.
Box 11 Folder 22 1950-1955
1950-1952, 1955. Correspondence with Benjamin B. Rosenberg, Director Field Service, regarding routine matters of the Technical Advisory Committee of the Committee on Community Organization of which Konvitz was a member.
Box 11 Folder 23 1969-1970
Box 11 Folder 24 1957
Letters from Professor Quincy Wright and Professor George Catlin, McGill University, regarding their contributions to the Cushman Festschrift. Copy of Catlin's "On Freedom" with revisions.
Box 11 Folder 25 1974
1947-1958, 1960, 1962, 1974. Correspondence from various people supporting Professor Konvitz's "A Letter to David Daiches" (April 1951). Memorandum from Konvitz to Daiches asking him to join the Academic Committee for the Hebrew University (February 10, 1947). Cordial letter from Daiches regarding Konvitz's plans to visit him while he is at Cambridge (October 8, 1952). Correspondence with John Daniels, researcher and author in social- economic areas such as labor-management relations, regarding routine academic and theological concerns. Daniels comments on his religious philosophy (February 7, 1949). Copies of articles by Daniels. Correspondence with Professor C.E. De Kiewiet, Acting President of Cornell University regarding scholarly and personal matters. De Kiewiet comments on some of Konvitz's articles and explains why he considers himself to be secular in his thinking (1949). De Kiewiet mentions that he would prefer to be writing and researching (June 18, 1949). Correspondence with Harry N. Rosenfield, Commissioner of the Displaced Persons Commission, regarding Konvitz's efforts to stimulate interest among Cornell professors in conducting research using the records of the Commission (December 1951-February 1952). Correspondence with William H Donnelly, standing Master of the Superior Court of New Jersey Chancery Division, regarding routine personal matters. Correspondence with Albert Dorskind, United States Court of Appeals. On the Lapides case (May 31, 1949). Correspondence with Garry De Yong, founder of the first American Atheist University (the Minnesota Institute of Philosophy) and the American Atheist Church regarding Yong's civil rights suit, concerning religious freedom, against the Minnesota Highway department. Konvitz provides Yong with references for finding quotations with respect to First Amendment Freedoms and especially freedom of religion (August 22, 1974).
Box 11 Folder 26 1948-1964
1948, 1953-1956, 1960-1964. Correspondence with Samuel H. Daroff, President of the American Jewish League for Israel, regarding League matters of interest to Konvitz as a member of the League's Board of Directors. Routine personal correspondence with Doctor Henry David, head of the Office of Science Resources Planning of the National Science Foundation (February 1964). Routine personal correspondence with Miguel De Capriles, Dean of New York University School of Law (November 13, 1964). Letter from C.W. de Kiewiet, President of the University of Rochester and former Acting President of Cornell, regarding personal matters. De Kiewiet discusses George Sabine and a tragic event in Cape Town in which he was the last person to speak with someone (Davie) before he died "in battle if ever man did." De Kiewiet describes the day on which his friend died as one of "a great imaginative act of defiance and faith" (February 6, 1961). Correspondence with Professor Lincoln Reis, Chairman of the Colleges and Universities Committee of the Democratic State Committee, regarding concerns of the Committee of which Konvitz was a member (November 1960). Routine personal correspondence with Charles Desmond, Chief Judge of the State of New York Court of Appeals. Correspondence with Elliot B. Doft in which Konvitz elucidates the history of Jewish students and faculty at Cornell (October 11, 1962). Correspondence with Judge Mary H. Donlon, United States Customs Court. Donlon responds to a letter from Doctor Konvitz passing along a query from Morris Bishop as to the origin of the idea that the Industrial and Labor Relations School should be established as one of the contract colleges at Cornell. Donlon responds in detail (December 17, 1962). Other routine personal correspondence with Donlon. Correspondence with Justice William O. Douglas, United States Supreme Court, regarding brief, and comments on publications (1952-1956). Correspondence with Rabbi Samuel H. Dresner, Editor of Conservative Judaism, and Doctor Abraham Duker, Yeshiva University and former President of the College of Jewish Studies in Chicago, regarding routine scholarly and personal matters.
Box 11 Folder 27 1961-1980
1961-1964, 1966-1967, 1970-1972, 1974-1980. Correspondence with Jack J. diamond, a member of the United Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society staff, regarding work being done at Cornell on migration and Diamond's own work on Israeli migration to the United States (August 4 and 12, 1966). Letter from Simcha Dinitz, Israeli Ambassador to the United States, inviting Doctor Konvitz to attend a private meeting with Yitzhak Rabin, Prime Minister of Israel (January 20, 1976). Correspondence with United States Senator Bob Dole regarding Konvitz's views on a number of bills concerning the limitation of police power with regard to privacy interests and on the Supreme Court's decision in Zucher versus Stanford Daily (June 29, 1978). Konvitz favors Dole's Bill, S. 3222 (July 24, 1978). Correspondence with Professor Norman Dorsen, Chairman of the American Civil Liberties Union and professor at New York University Law School. Dorsen notes that Konvitz is mentioned in the biography of Roger Baldwin as one of the early American Civil Liberties Union leaders (December 14, 1976). Dorsen asks Professor Konvitz if he can help in interesting graduating Cornell law students in applying for New York University graduate student grants for work in civil liberties (October 2, 1962). Correspondence with Congressman Thomas J. Downey, United States House of Representatives, regarding academic concerns at the West Point Military Academy. Letter from Congressman Robert F. Drinan, United States House of Representatives, thanking Konvitz for his views with regard to the Copyright Bill, H.R. 2223, which is before a Subcommittee of which Drinan is a member. Drinan comments that he has been impressed by the testimony of the publishers and others who have insisted that the definition of "fair use" as understood in the copyright law not be changed as opposed to the arguments of educators and librarians who want the understanding of "fair use" expanded (July 25, 1975). Personal correspondence with Doctor Alexander Dushkin, Institute of Contemporary Correspondence with Justice Edward R. Dudley, Supreme Court of New York, regarding the status of the Liberian Codification Project (November 9, 1978).
Box 11 Folder 28 1962-1963
Memorandum to Konvitz from D.E. Cullen regarding the possibility of getting support from a foundation to complete the damage suit manuscript (September 18, 1962)
Box 11 Folder 29 1946-1950
1946-1948, 1950. Correspondence with President Edmund E. Day, Cornell University. Konvitz agrees to serve on the committee concerned with the development and construction of the World War II Memorial Building to serve as an Interfaith Center and headquarters for the Cornell United Religious Works (November 2 and 3, 1948). Correspondence regarding the presentation of Sabine Festschrift to Professor Sabine. Konvitz, in a confidential letter, brought to Day's attention the comments of Doctor Felix S. Cohen, the Assistant Solicitor of the Department of the Interior, regarding the challenge to the validity of the will of a Puerto Rican resident who died willing some hundreds of thousands of dollars to Cornell University, by the leader of the local bar, Felix Ochoteca, on behalf of heirs or alleged heirs. Konvitz also passed on to Day biographical material included by Cohen [see Box 10, file 23 for the letter from Cohen to Konvitz] (November 13, 1947). Other personal correspondence.
Box 11 Folder 30 1946-1956
1946-1950, 1953, 1956. Correspondence with Associate Dean Miguel A. Capriles, New York University School of Law, regarding the chapters of the book, Latin-American Legal Philosophy, that Konvitz, de Capriles, and Hayzus cooperated in getting translated. Also correspondence regarding routine personal and professional matters.
Box 11 Folder 31 1949
A personal letter to Professor Konvitz from John Dewey thanking Konvitz for his review of Dewey's last book in the Reconstructionist. Dewey also praises the articles in the issue of the magazine with Konvitz's review. Also a notice that includes Konvitz's participation on a Philosophy Club Phi Delta Kappa panel discussion on John Dewey's contribution to philosophy, his impact on education, and his philosophy of freedom. Other routine announcements.
Box 11 Folder 32 1948-1959
1948-1950, 1953-1959. Personal correspondence with Professor Robert Dince, University of Georgia College of Business Administration. Dince is married to Konvitz's niece. In his letters Dince discusses his impressions of Georgia, the University of Georgia, and the race relations in the South and at the University.
Box 11 Folder 33 1961-1979
1961-1963, 1965-1968, 1975, 1977-1979. Personal Correspondence with Professor Robert Dince, Head of the Department of Bank and Finance at the University of Georgia. Konvitz mentions in a letter that while he is in Israel, in addition to lecturing at Hebrew University, he will advise the University on founding a department of labor studies and engage in some activities for the Histadrut and the Ministry of Labor (May 16, 1961). Dince, who knows former President Carter and Doctor Alfred Kahn, describes some of his impressions of political life in Washington (April 17, 1979). In other letters, Dince discusses race relations at the University of Georgia and in the South. He also discusses some of the financial, academic, and social aspects of the University.
Box 11 Folder 34 1958-1979
1958, 1964-1965, 1975-1979 [routine materials from various years between correspondence.] Letter to Konvitz from Leon J. Perelman, President of Dropsie University, thanking Konvitz for helping Dropsie secure a grant from the Merrill Trust Foundation (March 20, 1978). Letter from Abraham I. Katsh, President, regarding Konvitz's assistance in helping Dropsie secure a grant from the Merrill Trust Foundation (October 3, 1975). A copy of Dropsie's application and letter to Dean David A. Thomas, Administrator of the Trust. Konvitz commented on Katsh's draft letter to Thomas (October 3, 1975). Correspondence with Sol Satinsky: Konvitz explains his reasons for not accepting the office of President of Dropsie College. Konvitz explains that he prefers to be a practicing scholar than an administrator (March 18, 1965). Correspondence with Sol Satinsky and Albert M. Greefield: Konvitz comments on his impressions of the Dropsie College site. Konvitz suggests that the college be moved (July 20, 1984). Correspondence with Abraham A. Neuman, President. Konvitz explains that he has decided to turn down the offer of the presidency of Dropsie College because his career has been in other fields of scholarship (June 15, 1964). Correspondence with Satinsky, Konvitz suggests different polices that the Jewish Publication Society should consider regarding membership and a number of books the Jewish Publication Society should consider publishing (July 20, 1964). Correspondence with dale R. Corson, Provost of Cornell, congratulating Konvitz on the offer of the presidency of Dropsie College and expressing his pleasure that Konvitz declined (July 7, 1964). Correspondence with Samuel B. Finkel, Executive Vice-President of Dropsie. Konvitz accepts membership on the National Advisory Committee of Dropsie College (March 3, 1958). Konvitz also agreed to serve on the National Committee of Sponsors for the observance of the College's 50th Anniversary. Other routine letters and materials regarding the College.
Box 11 Folder 35 1947
Correspondence with Abraham A. Neuman, President, regarding routine personal matters.
Box 11 Folder 36 1949-1964
1949, 1953-1955, 1957, 1959-1962, 1964. Correspondence with Justice Edward R. Dudley, Supreme Court of the State of New York and President of the Borough of Manhattan. Dudley was also a Special Assistant to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored Peoples and appointed by President Truman to be the first black United States Ambassador to Liberia. Konvitz comments that he would like a closer identification with the African-American Institute of which Dudley is a member (July 31, 1959). Dudley describes some of the Institute's activities (Fall 1959). Other general correspondence relative to the Liberian Codification Project and routine and personal matters.
Box 12 Folder 1 1958-1966
1958, 1960-1962, 1964-1966. Correspondence with Beryl and Sam Epstein, and with Franklin Watts relating to Konvitz's suggestions that someone write a book on Hitler and Nazism that would be suitable for adolescents (June-July 1958). Other routine correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 2 1946-1962
1946-1949, 1951-1953, 1955, 1957-1959, 1962. Correspondence with Jerome C. Eisenberg, attorney, regarding the case of Seawell versus MacWithey in which the city of East Orange excluded blacks from a temporary veterans housing project giving priority to white veterans. While Konvitz agrees with Eisenberg that the New Jersey Supreme Court's decision in this case was wrong, he advises him not to appeal the decision to the United States supreme Court. Konvitz comments that a direct attack on the segregation doctrine in the Supreme Court is being prepared by the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (July 18, 1949). Other discussion on this case (June-July and September, 1949). Eisenberg wrote to Konvitz about the case because Konvitz had written about it in his "The Pursuit of Liberty" department in Common Ground, Summer, 1949 (June 21, 1949) correspondence with Doctor Ira Eisenstein, Rabbi for the Society for the Advancement of Judaism, and President of the Rabbinical Assembly of America. Konvitz provides detailed comments on the "Reconstructionist Platform" (May 9, 1949). Correspondence with Morris L. Ernst, a member of the President's Committee on Civil Rights, regarding the problems of a group libel action under present civil law (August 7, 1949). Letter to Charles T. Estes, United States Department of Labor; Konvitz mentions that in the first part of his course, "Patterns of Thought," he intends to address the subject of semantics, particularly as it relates to the problems in labor-management relations. In the second part he explains that the course will be devoted to formal logic and scientific method with especial emphasis on method in research in industrial and labor relations (January 27, 1947). Correspondence with Doctor Jones Simon, Chairman of the Board of Governors of Ethical Action, Incorporated; Konvitz provides Jones with a letter supporting his work on behalf of aliens who come to the United states as a place of refuge (February 19, 1957). Correspondence with other persons relating to legal, scholarly, and personal matters.
Box 12 Folder 3 1957-1980
1957, 1959, 1961-1962, 1965-1968, 1971-1976, 1978-1980. Correspondence with Clifford L. Alexander, Junior, Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Alexander asked Konvitz if he was interested in full-time summer employment as a Commission conciliator under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act (November 30, 1967). Doctor Konvitz was also asked to serve as a conciliator by Alexander's predecessor, Stephen N. Shulman (April 12, 1967). Konvitz declined both offers. Other routine correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 4 1947-1980
1947-1949, 1955-1964, 1966, 1973, 1980. Routine and personal correspondence with Hyman Edelman, attorney and personal correspondence with Hyman Edelman, attorney. Edelman is a relative of Doctor Konvitz.
Box 12 Folder 5 1950-1978
1950-1951, 1953-1954, 1960-1965, 1969, 1976-1978. Correspondence with Milton Eisenberg, attorney and Administrative Assistant to United States Senator Kenneth B. Keating; Konvitz mentions that he believes the attack on Judge Youngdahl in the Lettimore case is not justified (October 14, 1954). Konvitz comments that he stressed the work of Congress in the 1860s and 1870s in his Constitution and Civil Rights (1947) and A Century of Civil Rights books. Konvitz also mentions that he continued to believe that Justice Harlan's dissent in the 1883 case was correct and that an act of Congress on public accommodations could fall under the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Amendments (as well as the Commerce Clause) (July 29, 1963). Other routine correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 6 1949-1959
1949-1957, 1959. Routine Correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 7 1950-1952
Personal correspondence with Alex Rosen, Executive Director of the Jewish Community Center. In a letter to Rosen Konvitz explains the point on pragmatism he made in his January 18, 1951 address at the American Association for Jewish Education Conference. Konvitz believes that pragmatism left persons free to formulate their own philosophies and that without pragmatism mental and spiritual freedom would not be possible. Also correspondence regarding various other speeches Konvitz gave at the Center.
Box 12 Folder 8 1960
Correspondence with dean John McConnell, Industrial and Labor Relations School; Major General Almenin C. O'Hara, Chief of Staff to the Governor of New York and a member of the Civil War Centennial Commission; and Caroline K. Smith, Secretary of the State of New York, regarding Professor Konvitz's suggestions that the Governor appoint a special commission to organize a celebration of the centenary of the signing of the Emancipation Proclamation (November 23, 1960).
Box 12 Folder 9 1960-1978
1960-1961, 1962, 1965-1966, 1968-1971, 1973-1976, 1978. Correspondence with Prentice-Hall, Incorporated, and others on publication of The Twentieth Century Views - Ralph Waldo Emerson.
Box 12 Folder 10 1963-1964
Correspondence with Columbia University Press regarding Konvitz's proposal for a one-volume edition of Emerson's letters.
Box 12 Folder 11 1952-1953
Correspondence with Dean William M. Hepburn, Camar School of Law at Emory University relating to Konvitz's article on the McCarran Act for the Fall 1952 issue of the School's Journal of Public Law.
Box 12 Folder 12 1950-1954
Correspondence with J.J. Smith, Editor of The American annual, relating to routine editing concerns regarding Konvitz's articles on "Civil Liberties" for the 1951-1954 editions of the American Annual, yearbook of the Encyclopedia America. Copies of Konvitz's manuscripts are included.
Box 12 Folder 13 1954-1963
1954-1955, 1957-1960, 1963. Correspondence with editors of the Encyclopedia Britannica on editorial work and publication matters concerning Konvitz's articles on "Chinese Immigration," "Alien," Civil Liberties," and "Censorship." Copies of some of Konvitz's manuscripts and routine related materials.
Box 12 Folder 14 1970-1976
Correspondence with various people regarding the establishment of an Encyclopedia of Labor and Industrial Relations. The principal correspondents include Zvi H. Bar-Niv, President of the National Labor Court in Israel; A. Borkamp, a representative of Monton Publishers; Aharon Becker; and Professor John McConnell, among others. In the correspondence and related materials, all aspects of the proposed Encyclopedia are discussed in detail. Konvitz appears to be the primary person responsible for organizing and coordinating this effort which failed to find financial support. Also personal correspondence with McConnell.
Box 12 Folder 15 1972-1979
1972, 1977-1979. Correspondence with Officers of the Division of Fellowships of the National Endowment for the Humanities. A "Report on the Committee on Law and the Humanities" of which Doctor Konvitz was a member. Konvitz was on a member of a panel to review law fellowship proposals.
Box 12 Folder 16 1972
Correspondence with Charles Reischel and John De Pemberton, Junior, attorneys for the Commission, about their visit to Cornell on May 10, 1972 (May 3, 1972). Reischel comments that their meeting helped him with litigation in which he is involved (October 15, 1972).
Box 12 Folder 17 1960
Box 12 Folder 18 1965-1966
Correspondence with Judith Levin, Radio Program Coordinator at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, relating to preparations for Konvitz's participation in the Seminary's The Eternal Light radio series, "Academic Outlooks," which was broadcast on October 29, 1965. Included are transcripts of the program and related correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 19 1958-1980
1958, 1961, 1964-1971, 1973-1976, 1978-1980. Correspondence with David Fellman, Vilas Professor of Political Science, University of Wisconsin, and President of the American Association of University Professors, regarding Konvitz's book, Expanding Liberties, with regard to judicial review of Congressional legislation; the clear and present danger test; the importance of David Hume's contributions to American intellectual history and, particularly, James Madison's theory on factions; the role of Catholicism in Al Smith's political defeat, etcetera. Doctor Konvitz mentions that he is very interested in Hume's philosophy and that Hume is an important concern in his course in jurisprudence (June 10 and 16, 1966). Correspondence with Fellman regarding Konvitz's book Religious Liberty and Conscience; and the problems of defining conscience and referring to conscience as a standard (November 29 and December 12, 1968). Konvitz comments on voting procedures at American Association of University Professors annual meetings and on the importance of following the reports of Committee A that concludes that censure is not warranted on the facts found (May 1, 1964). Konvitz describes his discussion with Doctor Jerome Holland, President of Hampton Institute, regarding the problem of the relatively large number of Negro colleges that are on the list of censured colleges and universities (April 29, 1964). Other correspondence with Fellman regarding personal matters. Correspondence with Judge Sherman G. Finesilver, United States District Court, regarding Finesilver's request for information concerning Konvitz's writing and about writings on the relations between Jewish law and American law (May 11, 1972). Correspondence with Professor S.M. Finger, regarding publication of a memorandum, sent on March 10, 1975 to Prime Minister Rabin and a select group of Israelis, on "Guidelines for an Alternative - A Four Year Plan: A Constitution for Israel and Peace with Her Neighbors." the memorandum was written by Helel Kook and S. Merlin, both Israeli members of the first Knesset and of the Board of the Institute. The memorandum was published in Israel (April 30, 1975). Correspondence with Bernard Forer regarding Konvitz's attitudes about the Nazi parade in Skokie, Illinois on April 20, 1978. Konvitz comments on a statement by Forer regarding the Skokie demonstration. Konvitz mentions that for the Supreme Court to affirmatively act on the statement it would need to establish new constitutional principles (Which Konvitz outlines). Professor Konvitz also mentions that he does not believe that the American Civil Liberties Union should have undertaken to represent the Nazis. He argues that the American Civil Liberties Union is not obliged to accept every case that is presented to it and that their refusal of the case would not imply that the American Civil Liberties Union is in opposition to what the Nazi party demanded from the City of Skokie. It would only imply that the American Civil Liberties Union decided to use its limited resources on other cases (April 18, 1978). A copy of the statement by the Sarasota-Manatee Committee Against the Nazi march in Skokie. Other correspondence regarding routine personal matters. Correspondence with Senator Philip A. Hart, United States Senate. Konvitz sent Hart an article on the filibuster of the nomination of Abe Fontas which appeared in the October 25, 1968 Cornell Daily Sun. Konvitz commented that because the letter raises important constitutional issues, it should be made a part of the record of the case (October 25, 1968). Correspondence with Justice Abe Fortas, United States Supreme Court, also regarding Konvitz's October 25, 1968 statement (October 25, 1968). Extensive and detailed correspondence with Doctor Isaac Franck, Senior Research Scholar at the Joseph and Rose Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Center for Bioethics Georgetown University (1974 [1979-1981]) regarding publications and discussions of topics including Spinoza, Judaism, Einstein, and ritual. Also correspondence on each other's articles; and regarding a book on Spinoza and Judaism by Franck which Konvitz encouraged Cornell University Press to publish. Correspondence with Doctor Charles Frankel, United States Assistant Secretary of State, regarding Konvitz's review of Frankel's book, The Neglected Aspect of Foreign Affairs. Also personal and routine correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 20 1946-1960
Correspondence with Justice Felix Frankfurter, United States Supreme Court, relating to substantive issues concerning the retirement of Horace Kallen; and writings by Konvitz including a review of Frankfurter's book, Law and Politics. Frankfurter commented that he has been interested in and profited from Konvitz's writings and that he also regretted that they had not previously become personally acquainted (November 30, 1950, November 1950-February 1952). Correspondence with Doctor Charles S. Johnson, President of Fisk University, regarding Konvitz's lecture to Institute of Race Relations on "The Crisis of Civil Liberties and Moral Judgment." Konvitz spoke publically against organizations of conservative, Protestant ministers who advance the idea that capitalism is an inherent part of Christianity and democracy. Correspondence with Professor Edward Fox, History Department of Cornell, in reference to a chapter on "Prophets" by Orlinsky. Correspondence with Justice Jerome Frank, United States Circuit Court of Appeals, regarding Konvitz's review of Frank's book, Courts on Trial (February 1950-January 1951).
Box 12 Folder 21 1956-1966
Routine correspondence wit Justice Thomas E. Fairchild, State of Wisconsin Supreme Court, including Konvitz's discussion of Rabbi Gilbert's paper at a 1963 Church-State Conference (October 16-November 4, 1963). Correspondence with George H. Fowler, member of the New York State Commission Against Discrimination (January 9, 1959). Correspondence with Doctor L.M. Fruchtbaum, member of the National Executive Committee of Freeland League for Jewish Territorial Colonization. Correspondence with others regarding routine and personal matters.
Box 12 Folder 22 1955-1989
Box 12 Folder 23 1946-1950
1946, 1949-1950
Box 12 Folder 24 1951-1953
Box 12 Folder 25 1963-1968
1963-1965, 1967-1968
Box 12 Folder 26 1951-1964
1951-1953, 1955-1957, 1961- 1964. Correspondence with Doctor Louis Finkelstein, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary of America. Finkelstein asked Konvitz to attend a preliminary meeting with Professor Mordecai Kaplan, Professor Erich Fromm, and himself to discuss a plan for the investigation of ethics in the Jewish tradition as it applies to modern life (April 11, 1957). Konvitz spoke on "The Solution to Practical and Moral Problems Through the Use of Reason: In Advancement of Civil Rights," on November 20, 1956 as part of a lecture series; Konvitz lectured at the Institute for Religious and Social Studies on July 2-3, 1956 in the Jewish Theological Seminary's Summer Session on "How Law Changes," (May 21, 1956). Also correspondence regarding Konvitz's lectures at the Seminary (1956, 1962) and his views on civil liberties and civil rights (May 4, 1956).
Box 12 Folder 27 1966-1978
1966-1969, 1971-1972, 1978. The faculty of the Seminary unanimously voted, and the Board of Directors unanimously approved, to award Konvitz the Honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the Seminary at its June 4, 1972 Commencement Exercises (March 23, 1972). Letter from Konvitz to Finkelstein expressing Konvitz's concern about the future of Dropsie College (November 14, 1966). Other correspondence with Finkelstein regarding routine publication, scholarly and personal matters.
Box 12 Folder 28 1952-1959
1952-1953, 1955, 1957, 1959. Doctor Konvitz participated in a meeting of scholars knowledgeable about Liberia, which was convened for September 19, 1957, by the Ford Foundation. The purpose of the meeting was to explore the possibility of expanding American knowledge ad academic resources relating to Liberia. Confidential reports and memorandum regarding the need for an interdisciplinary social and economic study of Liberia are included (August 9, 1957). Correspondence with Doctor Rose Goldsen, Department of Sociology at Cornell, alluding to a proposal to the Ford Foundation Behavioral Sciences Division "For an Interdisciplinary Research Seminar and Empirical Investigation of the Impact of Operating Relief Systems on Behavior, Attitudes, and Values of Social Groups." Konvitz and several other Cornell scholars agreed to participate in the proposed seminar and research.
Box 12 Folder 29 1954-1965
1954, 1956-1959, 1961, 1963-1965. Correspondence from Professor L.C. Green, Director of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and Dean of the Faculty of Law at University of Singapore, offering Konvitz a one-year appointment as a visiting professor (February 8, 1965). Correspondence with Doctor Chiam Raphael, British Treasury Chambers, and with Doctor S. Clement Leslie, Treasury Chambers, regarding Konvitz's efforts to have Leslie invited to Cornell University as a lecturer (October 2, 1958-March 9, 1959). Correspondence from other foreign scholars requesting routine information from Konvitz regarding publications and academic programs and positions.
Box 12 Folder 30 1947-1979
1947-1948, 1950, 1953, 1957, 1959-1961, 1965-1970, 1972-1974, 1977-1979. Correspondence with Judge Philip Forman, United States Court of Appeals, regarding personal matters. Forman provides detailed accounts of his activities, work and health. Konvitz's letters also contain similar information.
Box 12 Folder 31 1949
Copy of a letter to Chancellor Day, Cornell University, and a report on recommendations of the Fox Committee. The Committee was responsible for considering Cornell's role in identifying and clarifying the basic values of traditional American freedoms. It recommended that the University offer a course in Great Decisions (December 1, 1949).
Box 12 Folder 32 1947-1962
1947-1952, 1962. Personal correspondence with Professor Philip G. Frank, Harvard University and President of the Board of Trustees of the Institute for the Unity of Science. Doctor Konvitz was the Secretary-Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the Institute. Correspondence on financial matters, activities, and the incorporation of the Institute. Konvitz prepared the papers of incorporation and served on the Institute's initial Board of Trustees (January 28, 1947).
Box 12 Folder 33 1946-1947
Personal correspondence with Professor Charles Fairman, Stanford University, regarding biographies of Supreme Court justices. Konvitz commented that he has been interested in studying the work on the Supreme Court of Mr. Justice Harlan (January 17, 1947). Correspondence with Doctor I.N. Steinberg, Secretary-General of Freeland League for Jewish Territorial Colonization, regarding Konvitz's involvement in the work of the League. Konvitz contacted Professor F.F. Hill, Head of the Department of Agricultural Economics at Cornell, with reference to recommendations of personnel to serve on an Expert Commission to select, in Surinam, a suitable area and prepare the economic plans and financial estimates for settling Jews from Europe (July 18, 1947). Steinberg discussed the work of the Freeland League and the possibility of settling Jews in Surinam (July 17, 1947). Detailed correspondence between Konvitz and Steinberg relating to what action should be taken with respect to the German state after the War (January 28, 1947). Konvitz, in arguing in support of his review of a book by Victor Gollancz, emphasized the necessity of not "pushing Germany into the arms of Russia."
Box 12 Folder 34 1947-1979
1947-1958, 1961-1962, 1965-1966, 1971, 1979. Personal correspondence with Charles Frost and his son.
Box 12 Folder 35 1946-1959
1946-1947, 1950, 1952, 1953-1954, 1958-1959. Correspondence with Edward Fuhlbruegge, Director of the Division of Social Sciences at Rutgers University, relative to Rutgers University, the American Association of University Professors, mutual friends and other personal matters.
Box 12 Folder 36 1960-1979
1960-1967, 1974, 1978-1979, 1981. Personal correspondence.
Box 12 Folder 37 1951-1958
1951, 1958
Box 13 Folder 1 1953-1965
1953, 1955-1959, 1965. Correspondence with administrators at the Fund for the Republic. Doctor Konvitz was asked to participate at a May 5-9, 1958 seminar sponsored by the Fund's project, "Religion in a Democratic Society" (March 21, 1958). Correspondence in regard to the publication of Konvitz's book, Fundamental Liberties of a Free People, which he wrote with fellowship support from the Fund. Konvitz suggests that the Fund support the study of civil liberties in the field of labor relations. Correspondence with the Fund, with Congressman Clifford P. Case, with Vice President Wright, Provost Hill, Dean Catherwood, and Professor Adams relative to Konvitz's unsuccessful proposal for the establishment of a Bill of Rights Institute at Cornell University to be financed by the Fund (March-September 1953).
Box 13 Folder 2 1952-1978
1952-1960, 1963-1964, 1972-1973, 1976, 1978. Correspondence with Cornell University Press about Konvitz's book, Fundamental Liberties of a Free People. Letters from Chief Justice Earl Warren and Justice William O. Douglas thanking Konvitz for copies of his book. Douglas comments that he found the book to be extremely provocative and the best over-all summary and critique that he has read of the First Amendment problems and their treatment by the Court (March 27, 1958). Correspondence with Professor Walter Gellhorn, Department of Law at Columbia University, who nominated Konvitz's book the Sidney Hillman Award (January 13, 1958). Correspondence with Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas. Professor Konvitz mentions that he has been criticized for being too lenient toward Douglas and Justice Black and too critical toward Justice Frankfurter (December 4, 1957).
Box 13 Folder 3 1959-1965
Letter from Marvin Gelfand, Farleigh Dickinson University, asking Konvitz for comments on a "Preliminary Report of the Committee to Save Ellis Island," (February 25, 1960). Correspondence with Professor Eric Goldman, Department of History at Princeton University; Konvitz participated in the National Broadcasting Company (NBC) television program, Open Mind, on "The Living Constitution: Labor and the Corporation," December 11, 1960. Goldman was the program's moderator (November 29, 1960). Correspondence with Judge Sidney Goldmann, Appellate Division of the Superior Court of New Jersey (February 1959-March 1960). Personal correspondence with Paul Goodman, Institute for Policy Studies, on the possibility of the American Association of University Professors helping to ensure that intellectuals and artists are not misrepresented in media interviews (October 10, 1963). Correspondence with Dean Erwin N. Griswold, Harvard Law School, on issues of mutual interest including law case books and the nature and attitude of law school students.
Box 13 Folder 4 1948-1959
1948, 1950-1959. Correspondence with Susan Brandeis Gilbert and Jacob H. Gilbert, on the Brandeis Centennial celebration at Cornell on April 2, 1957. Correspondence with Robert A. Goldwin, American Foundation for Political Education, relating to Konvitz's Civil Rights in Immigration. Professor Konvitz explains why he did not consider the Fifth Amendment problem (June 15, 1954). Correspondence with Bertha Gruner. Konvitz mentioned that at various times he has urged upon the College of Arts and Sciences the establishment of a Middle East area research and teaching institute (February 13, 1950). Correspondence with Doctor George C. Guins. Konvitz comments that he has a strong interest in Soviet legal problems, in Marxism and particularly the Marxist position with respect to law and the state (May 5, 1958).
Box 13 Folder 5 1966-1980
Correspondence with Professor Marc Galanter, University of Wisconsin-Madison Law School, on Galanter's publication on the problem of affirmative action in India (October 20, 1978). Correspondence with Doctor Abe P. Gannes relating to activities of the Hebrew Culture Foundation. Correspondence with Dennis M. Gingold. Konvitz comments that disqualifying differences between citizens and aliens should be eliminated (April 26, 1973). Correspondence with Sidney Goldmann, former Superior Court of New Jersey Appellate Division Judge. Professor Konvitz mentions that at Cornell a campaign to raise three and a half million dollars on behalf of Jewish studies was identified with Johnathan Netanyahu. Konvitz also describes his memories of Trenton when he was a child (September 21, 1976). Konvitz comments that the field of legal history in the United States has been neglected and discusses previous suggestions he has made concerning the writing of a history of legal developments in New Jersey. Other personal correspondence with Goldmann. Correspondence with Doctor Eli Goldstein, President of the Herzliah-Jewish Teachers Seminary regarding the Seminary. Konvitz served as Acting Chairman of the Academic Advisory Council of the Seminary (June 1974-October 1975). Correspondence with Rabbi Israel Goldstein on personal matters (September 1973-June 1980). Correspondence with Rabbi Irwin Groner, Chairman of the Rabbinical Assembly Convention for 1976, in regard to Konvitz's address at the March 29, 1976 Convention (December 22, 1975). Correspondence with Professor Bertram M. Gross, Distinguished Professor of Urban Affairs and Planning at Hunter College, commenting on an article by Gross on post-industrial neo-Fascism. Correspondence with Herbert Gussman who, for several years, donated funds to Cornell University for the acquisition of books by Olin Library in Semitic languages and literatures. Other personal correspondence (June 1969-December 1980).
Box 13 Folder 6 1949-1956
1949-1951, 1952-1956. Personal correspondence with Ben Gallob in which the economic views of Hapoel Hamizrachi and Israel laws on religion are discussed. Also correspondence regarding The National Jewish Post where Gallob was employed as the managing editor until February 1951; and personal matters.
Box 13 Folder 7 1946-1959
Correspondence with Edward Gaulkin, Judge in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Appellate Division, regarding Congressman Kean of New Jersey, his activities for the Jewish Community, and his insights with regard to the role of the court system and judges. Konvitz describes the American Jewish Congress and his involvement in Congress affairs. Includes a copy of a letter from United States Congressman Robert W. Kean to Gaulkin. Kean comments that he has been concerned that the Taft-Hartley Amendment may be made an important issue in his campaign and discusses strategy to counter attacks on his position (June 9, 1950). Konvitz praises an article by Gaulkin on the lawyers' loyalty oath and comments that the article is an affirmation of the right or duty of civil disobedience as envisioned by Thoreau and is in the great tradition of liberalism (July 29, 1949). Other correspondence with Gaulkin. Gaulkin discusses the politics and situations of a prosecutor and New Jersey State Judge. Also personal correspondence.
Box 13 Folder 8 1960-1980
1960-1975, 1977-1980. Personal correspondence with Edward Gaulkin. Gaulkin discusses national and international political situations. Correspondence with Gaulkin's son, Charles, who works for the publication department of the United Nations on the United Nations Human Rights Commission and its investigation of the Israeli practices with respect to the Arab population in the occupied territory. Konvitz and Edward Gaulkin are close friends, and this is reflected in the nature of their correspondence.
Box 13 Folder 9 1964-1976
Correspondence with Professor Peter I. Rose, Smith College, regarding Konvitz's contribution to the volume.
Box 13 Folder 10 1956-1978
1956, 1958, 1960-1963, 1965, 1968, 1973, 1975, 1978. Correspondence with Arthur J. Goldberg, United States Ambassador at Large and former Secretary of Labor. Goldberg asks Konvitz to join him and several other individuals and organizations in signing a letter Goldberg wrote urging Kurt Waldheim, Secretary-General of the United Nations, to ensure that member states of the United Nations refrain from expelling or suspending Israel from the United Nations (August 15, 1975). Includes copies of Goldberg's letter to Waldheim (August 14, 1975) and of Waldheim's reply (September 8, 1975). Goldberg asks Konvitz to join him and others in signing an appeal that he wrote to Soviet Union leaders for the granting of amnesty on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, for Soviet Jews who are imprisoned for actions growing out of their desire to emigrate from the Soviet Union to join their families in Israel (January 26, 1973). Includes copy of Goldberg's letter to Soviet leaders. Konvitz comments on his interest in a national celebration of the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation. Konvitz mentions that it would be appropriate for the School of Industrial and Labor Relations to play a notable role in a national celebration. Konvitz suggests that the School might set up a lecture series, which might result in the publication of a volume (March 17, 1961). Goldberg is supportive of the idea and agrees with Professor Konvitz that a commemoration of the centennial should serve as an occasion for the celebration for the case of labor's freedom as well as that of civil rights (March 29, 1961). A copy of a letter from Professor Horace M. Kallen to Goldberg urging him to make the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation an important occasion in remembrance of the Civil War (March 21, 1961). Other correspondence between Konvitz and Goldberg is related to strategies for raising research funds (April 24, 191) and personal matters.
Box 13 Folder 11 1962-1979
1962-1969, 1978-1979. Correspondence with Morris Goldstein relating to Fanny Goldstein Memorial Fund and the Barnett P. Goldstein Memorial Scholarship. Also personal correspondence.
Box 13 Folder 12 1949-1954
Personal correspondence with Rabbi Robert Gordis, Chairman of the Board of Editors of "Judaism." Konvitz was a member of the Editorial Board. Konvitz explains that the Industrial and Labor Relations Review must be above partisanship and any class or personal interest. Doctor Konvitz comments that while he often rejects papers on the basis of his own judgment, he does not finally accept them unless they have been read and approved by a member and the chairman of the Editorial Board as well as himself. Detailed correspondence relating to the efforts of Konvitz and Gordis in securing funding from the American Jewish Congress for the establishment of the magazine Judaism. Detailed discussions about the establishment and publication of "Judaism." Also personal correspondence.
Box 13 Folder 13 1948-1951
1948, 1950-1951. Correspondence with Doctor Hirsch L. Gordon on reviews of the books by Konvitz's father and of Gordon's book Maggid of Caro.
Box 13 Folder 14 1967-1974
Correspondence with Professor Gotesky, Department of Philosophy, Northern Illinois University. In Konvitz's November 10, 1967 letter to Gotesky, Konvitz discusses reactions to the establishment of Cornell United Religious Work. In his own letter, Gotesky comments that he agrees with Konvitz that religious organizations should not be under hegemony of a university. Gotesky also comments that he agrees with Konvitz's recommendation that religious institutions should be run and supported by those who have a lasting interest in them. Gotesky recommends a plan for the dis-establishment of Cornell United Religious Work (October 28, 1969). Other very detailed correspondence from Gotesky on philosophical questions, particularly relating to Gotesky's attitudes and perceptions about world events, life, his work, himself, and Konvitz. Also correspondence on Horace Kallen and The Philosophy Forum for which Gotesky was Editor, and Konvitz a member of the Editorial Board. Scholarly and personal correspondence.
Box 13 Folder 15 1954-1959
Correspondence with Professor Rubin Gotesky, Department of Philosophy and Religion at the University of Georgia. Copy of a letter from Horace Kallen to Gotesky. Kallen explains how Gotesky and Konvitz diverge on their fundamental center of allegiance (October 4, 1954). Letter from Konvitz to Gotesky in which Konvitz comments on Gotesky's involvement in the Unitarian church in Athens (October 18, 1954). Other correspondence from Gotesky including detailed discussions of religion and race relations, institutional politics, and the fear of Communist faculty at the University of Georgia. Konvitz and Gotesky became friends as undergraduates in a philosophy course at New York University (June 7, 1955).
Box 13 Folder 16 1974-1980
Detailed personal correspondence from Gotesky
Box 13 Folder 17 1960-1969
[1960- ] 1960-1969. Correspondence from Gotesky. Gotesky discusses in detail his work, his attitudes toward life, scholarly issues, and literature. Correspondence between Konvitz and Gotesky regarding the latter's "Charter of Academic Rights and University Governance" and suggestion that the American Association of University Professors develop models of legislation in which the rights of faculty are protected (November 20, 1965). Konvitz comments that he does not believe that state legislatures are likely to be more sympathetic than college and university trustees to the role of faculty in university governance (November 24, 1965). Doctor Konvitz believes that the American Association of University Professors has been very influential with respect to academic freedom.
Box 13 Folder 18 1946-1954
[Before January 1954] 1946-1954. Correspondence with Gotesky. Konvitz mentions that anyone who has criticized his writings on Israel and Zionism has done so on the basis of any alleged misstatement of fact (December 7, 1949). Copy of a detailed letter from John Dewey to Gotesky commenting on Gotesky's essay on Liberalism and Crisis (November 28, 1948). Copy of a letter from Dewey to Gotesky commenting on Gotesky's review of Dewey's latest book (October 14, 1948). Other correspondence almost entirely from Gotesky consists of his replies to Konvitz's letters, detailing his views on social and political issues of the time.
Box 14 Folder 1 1946-1966
1946-1949, 1952, 1955, 1958, 1960, 1962, 1966. Correspondence with Herman A. Gray relating to the disposition of the archives and libraries of the American Association for Social Security and of Abe Apstein. Konvitz encouraged Gray to arrange for the materials to be donated to the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations. Other routine personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 2 1967-1980
1967, 1969, 1971, 1975, 1978-1980. Correspondence with Israel B. Green. Konvitz and Green discuss the concept of equity. Correspondence with other persons, including Abraham Harmon, the President of Hebrew University, and Greene's wife and daughter, on the establishment of the Israel B. Greene Foundation for Equity Studies at Hebrew University. Other personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 3 1960-1964
[1960- ] 1960-1961. 1964. Routine personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 4 1947-1959
1947-1950, 1952-1959. Correspondence with Greene including the mention of legal issues such as statutory interpretation and the Fifth Amendment. Also personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 5 1974
A copy of an honors thesis on "England, the Apocalypse, and the Return of the Jews."
Box 14 Folder 6 1971-1981
1971-1975, 1979-1981. Correspondence with Rabbi Howard R. Greenstein about lectures that he has attended that were given by Doctor Konvitz. Also routine personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 7 1949-1979
1949-1951, 1956, 1958, 1960, 1962-1964, 1969, 1971, 1971-1974, 1976-1979. Largely personal correspondence with Justice William B. Groat, Administrative Judge of the Supreme Court of New York State.
Box 14 Folder 8 1961-1964
1961, 1964. Correspondence with Charles E. Cuningham, Social Science Editor of Grolier Encyclopedia, regarding Professor Konvitz's article on Liberia for the Encyclopedia International.
Box 14 Folder 9 1946-1951
1946-1947, 1949, 1951. Correspondence with Doctor Feliks Gross, Institute and Regional Studies and Graduate School of Arts and Science at New York University. Gross describes in some detail aspects of scholarly problems in the fields of economics and international and labor relations which he was considering. Also personal correspondence.
Box 14 Folder 10 1949-1963
1949, 1952-1959, 1963. Correspondence with the Guggenheim Memorial Foundation. Konvitz unsuccessfully applied for a second fellowship to study Israeli civil liberties and Israeli labor movements and the human rights work of the Council of Europe (June 26, 1958).
Box 14 Folder 11 1949-1964
1949, 1954-1960, 1962-1964. Correspondence with Herbert Gussman on contributions to Cornell University Libraries for the acquisition and processing of Hebrew and Judaica books.
Box 14 Folder 12 1940-1961
Correspondence with Justice Philip Halpern, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of New York, relating to Halpern's requests for material on activities of the United Nations in the field of human rights. Konvitz comments that non-Americans always have difficulty understanding that in the United States there is no "minorities" problem, except for the Indian. Rather, the problems in the United States impinge on individual rights (September 14, 1954). Correspondence with United States Senator Thomas C. Hennings, Junior on a resolution introduced by Hennings to curb abuses of committee power in the Senate by introducing codes of fair procedure (January 26, 1955). Letter from J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of investigation, in reply to a request from Konvitz for a copy of Hoover's article, "How the FBI Tracks Reds and Spies" (November 26, 1952). Correspondence with United States Senator Hubert H. Humphrey, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Labor and Labor Management Relations. Humphrey requested that Konvitz testify before the Subcommittee on the subject of Communist domination of certain unions. Konvitz could not accept the invitation because it conflicted with his trip to Liberia (May 19, 1952). Correspondence with other persons regarding scholarly, academic, and personal matters.
Box 14 Folder 13 1947-1966
1947-1949, 1951-1952, 1955-1966. Correspondence with Professor Louis M. Hacker, Department of Economics at Columbia University. Konvitz asks Hacker to teach his American Ideals course in the spring of 1965 when Konvitz will be at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (February 3, 1964). Konvitz and Hacker were unable to agree on when the class would be scheduled (February 7, 1964). Routine personal correspondence with Paul M. Herzog, President of the American Arbitration Association (December 1961 and January 1958); and Doctor Jerome Holland, President of Hampton Institute. Konvitz mentions that David Fellman, the President of the American Association of University Professors, concurred with him that Konvitz should discuss with Holland some of the problems that the American Association of University Professors has had concerning some Black colleges and universities (April 4, 1964). Personal correspondence with James M. Nabrit, Junior, President of Howard University (July 1960); and with Doctor Edwin H. Wilson, Executive Director of the American Humanist Association, and editors of The Humanist. Correspondence with United States Senator Hubert Humphrey. Humphrey asks Konvitz for his advice on the appropriate line of Presidential succession (January 22, 1964). Routine correspondence with David L. Hurwood, Secretary of the Board of Governors of the Menorah Association, Incorporated. Konvitz was the Secretary of the Association's Menorah Faculty Council.
Box 14 Folder 14 1948-1980
1948, 1955-1960, 1962-1980. Correspondence with Professor William Haber, Department of Economics at the University of Michigan and international president of Obshestvo Remeslenofo zemledelcheskofo Truda (ORT), regarding routine activities concerning their involvement in Jewish organizations, mutual friends, and other personal matters. Also, some correspondence from Haber commenting on the political situation in Israel (April 19, 1978). In a letter from Haber to Konvitz, Haber describes his impressions of the situation for Jewish deported persons in Europe in 1948 (March 12, 1948). Personal correspondence with Mortimer Jacobson, President of Hadassah (August 22, 1966); and with Rose L. Halprin, former President of Hadassah (May 27, 1976). Also routine correspondence with Professor Oscar Handlin, Librarian of Harvard University Library (June 8, 1979). William H. Hastie, Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit (August 21, 1968). Correspondence with Kalman Sultanik, Chairman of the Herzl Press, regarding the possibility of Konvitz's taking the position of Chairman of the Editorial Board of Midstream (January 26, 1977). Correspondence with Doctor Stuart C. Haskins relating to their mutual interest in Ralph Waldo Emerson (October 1973-December 1977). Personal correspondence with Chaim Herzog, Israeli Ambassador to the United Nations (July 1977-November 1980). Isaac Herzog is a former student at Cornell. Correspondence with Professor J.A. Heschel, the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, regarding the statement expressing Jewish concern over developments in Vietnam that was written by Heschel and Doctor Leo Pfeffer. Heschel explains that the statement expresses Jewish religious and ethical beliefs and that its authors feel that it is important that prominent Jewish persons speak out as Americans and, specifically, as Jews (September 9, 1966). While Konvitz comments that he does not question the right of Jewish organizations to take positions on public matters with respect to individual action, he does know that his Jewish conscience is different fro that of others who are Christian. Doctor Konvitz remarks that "conscience is a God-given gift that makes all of us speak more clearly to Jews than to Christians." Letter from Vice-President Humphrey thanking Konvitz for his congratulations. Humphrey mentions that he is interested in the maximum application of the insight of the behavioral sciences toward the solution of many domestic and foreign problems (February 23, 1965). Humphrey mentions that he will make Konvitz's statement on Presidential succession available to the Subcommittee on Constitutional Amendments of the Committee on the Judiciary which is investigating the question (April 1, 1964). Personal correspondence with Doctor David Hyatt, President of the National Conference of Christians and Jews, Incorporated (July 1966-December 1977). Correspondence with others regarding routine and personal matters.
Box 14 Folder 15 1973-1978
Correspondence with Doctor Abraham Kaplan, Provost of the University of Haifa. Konvitz agrees to serve as a member of the Academic Advisory Board of the Academy for Jewish Studies Without Walls, sponsored by the American Jewish Committee and the University of Haifa (June 1, 1973).
Box 14 Folder 16 1968
Detailed letter from Martha Applegarth Hallane relative to Konvitz's review of a book by Matthew Josephson (January 26, 1968).
Box 14 Folder 17 1946-1954
1946-1947, 1949, 1951, 1953-1954. Personal correspondence with Benjamin Halpern, director of the Department of Culture and Education of the Jewish Agency for Palestine and former Managing Editor of Jewish Frontier
Box 14 Folder 18 1966-1967
Correspondence with Thomas M. Law, Director of the Division of Business of the Hampton Institute, regarding Konvitz's evaluation of his visit to Hampton on March 13-14, 1967; and routine documents about the Cornell-Hampton Cooperative Program.
Box 14 Folder 19 1947-1976
1947-1948 1957-1958, 1960, 1976. Correspondence with book review editors and the president of the Harvard Law Review in relation to book reviews by Konvitz and the possibility of Konvitz writing an article.
Box 14 Folder 20
Materials regarding John F. Hatchett. Documents concerning Hatchett and concerning his relationship to Cornell. ACCESS RESTRICTED. No date.
Box 14 Folder 21 1950-1980
1950-1952, 1955, 1957-1959, 1962, 1965-1967, 1969-1970, 1972- 1973, 1978-1980. Correspondence with Zvi H. Bar-Niv, President of the National Labor Court, relative to the establishment of the Institute of Labor and Social Security Studies at Hebrew University. Correspondence with Professor Jacob Katz, Rector of Hebrew University, about their mutual interest in Jewish rights in the Diaspora.
Box 14 Folder 22 1972
Correspondence with Doctor Gershon Winer, Hayim Greenberg Teachers Seminary, regarding the reorganization of the Seminary. Konvitz agrees to serve as Chairman of the Academic Council of the Hayim Greenberg Institute (February 29, 1972)
Box 14 Folder 23 1946-1953
1946, 1948-1949, 1951-1953. Personal correspondence with Eugene Hayman, a former Cornell student.
Box 14 Folder 24 1959-1960
Correspondence and memorandums relating to the Hebraic Studies Fund at Cornell University. Professor Konvitz helped to establish the Fund for contributions to be used to purchase Hebrew books by the Cornell library.
Box 14 Folder 25 1961-1970
1961-1962, 1964-1970. Detailed correspondence primarily with Doctor Samuel M. Blumenfield, Secretary of the Hebrew Culture Foundation and Director of the Department of Education and Culture of the Jewish Agency, regarding all aspects of the affairs of the Foundation. Doctor Konvitz has been the Chairman of the Foundation since 1962
Box 14 Folder 26 1962-1963
[1962- ] 1962-1963. Correspondence relating to the Hebrew Culture Foundation primarily with Doctor Blumenfield.
Box 14 Folder 27 1955-1962
1955, 1962. A copy of the Foundation's By- Laws which were written by Konvitz.
Box 15 Folder 1 1956-1961
Correspondence with Doctor Judah J. Shapiro, Secretary of the National Foundation regarding the Foundation's support for Jewish scholarship at Cornell.
Box 15 Folder 2 1954-1969
1954, 1962, [1965- 1969]. Detailed correspondence with Stuart M. Brown, Junior, Dean of Cornell's College of Arts and Sciences; James A. Perkins, President of Cornell; and Professors Isaac Rabinowitz and David Patterson, relative to the Hebrew Culture Foundation's grant in support of the teaching of modern Hebrew language and literature at Cornell; Patterson's position at Cornell; and the establishment of a Department of Semitic Languages and Literature.
Box 15 Folder 3 1968-1971
1970-1971, 1968-1971. Correspondence with various people but mostly with Doctor Abraham P. Gannes, Secretary of the Foundation, on all aspects of Foundation work.
Box 15 Folder 4 1971-1974
1972-1973 [1971-1973] 1974. Correspondence with Professor Jacob Neusuer, Department of Religious Studies at Brown University.
Box 15 Folder 5 1973-1977
1974-1975 [1973]-1977. Correspondence with people involved in activities of the Hebrew Culture Foundation
Box 15 Folder 6 1978-1980
1978 [1978-1979] 1980. Correspondence with persons involved in activities of the Hebrew Culture Foundation. Also reports, minutes, and memorandums.
Box 15 Folder 7 1965
Correspondence with Rose L. Halprin, Chairperson of the Jewish Agency - American Section and former President of Hadassah, relating to the Hebrew Culture Foundation.
Box 15 Folder 8 1962-1965
Correspondence between Konvitz and Doctor Samuel M. Blumenfield, Secretary of the Foundation, and several colleges and universities (including Columbia University, Fairleigh Dickinson University, Baltimore Hebrew College, the University of Chicago, Hofstra College, Indiana University, Kent State University, Long Island University, the New School for Social Research, New York University, the University of Pennsylvania, Rutgers University, the University of Texas, Washington University, and West Virginia University) regarding Foundation grants and the Hebrew programs of these institutions.
Box 15 Folder 9 1965-1966
Letter from Doctor Konvitz to Dean David A. Thomas, School of Business and Public Affairs at Cornell, on the possibility of a grant to the Hebrew Culture Foundation from the Merrill Trust.
Box 15 Folder 10 1963-1966
1963 [1965] 1966. Letter from Professor Stuart M. Brown, Junior, Dean of Cornell's College of Arts and Sciences, relative to the teaching of modern Hebrew language and literature at Cornell (October 7, 1965). Correspondence with Doctor James A. Perkins, President of Cornell. Konvitz informs Perkins of the Foundation's decision to support a position in modern Hebrew language and literature (October 26, 1965).
Box 15 Folder 11 1962
[1962- ] 1962. Correspondence with Louis E. Levinthal, former Chairman of the Hebrew Culture Foundation; and other correspondence relating to routine Foundation matters
Box 15 Folder 12 1963-1980
Memorandums and minutes of Board of Directors meetings for each year between 1963 and 1979 and correspondence on the activities and finances of the Foundation.
Box 15 Folder 13 1976-1979
1976-1979. Includes minutes of Board of Directors meetings, financial information, and copies of the report, "The Hebrew Culture Foundation 1955-1978," by Abraham P. Gannes (November 1977)
Box 15 Folder 14 1962-1963
[1962- ] 1962-1963. Correspondence with Doctor Emanuel Neuman, President of the Tarbuth Foundation, Incorporated
Box 15 Folder 15 1962-1965
[1962- ] 1962-1965. Correspondence with Judah J. Shapiro, Secretary of the National Foundation for Jewish Culture. In a letter from Shapiro, written on the behalf of Doctor Nahum Goldmann of the World Zionist Movement, Shapiro informs Konvitz that Goldmann wants Konvitz to serve on a United States and Canada committee and to attend the committee meetings in Geneva between August 23 and August 26, 1965, at the expense of the World Zionist Organization (May 14, 1965).
Box 15 Folder 16 1962-1965
Includes report of programs in Hebrew and Jewish studies
Box 15 Folder 17 1980-1981
Box 16 Folder 1 1966-1979
1966, 1968-1971, 1973-1979. Includes financial statements of the Foundation, a copy of the Foundation's certificate of incorporate, and other Foundation correspondence and material
Box 16 Folder 2 1966-1978
1966-1968, 1971-1972, 1977-1978. Correspondence with administrators. Konvitz was awarded the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters at the Hebrew Union College - Jewish Institute of Religion, America's Seminary of Reform Judaism, on June 5, 1966.
Box 16 Folder 3 1961-1962
Box 16 Folder 4 1946-1977
Correspondence with Rabbi Bernard Heller, President of Yeshiva Rabbi Joseph Konvitz, and director of the Jewish Cultural Property Division, under the American Military Government. Konvitz comments on the "home rule" proposal by Judge Hofstadter (January 19, 1951). Other correspondence relating to the Yeshiva Rabbi Joseph Konvitz and personal matters. Also a copy of the "Certificate of Incorporate of the Bernard Heller Foundation, Incorporated."
Box 16 Folder 5 1946-1977
Correspondence with Rabbi Bernard Heller, President of Yeshiva Rabbi Joseph Konvitz, and director of the Jewish Cultural Property Division, under the American Military Government. Konvitz comments on the "home rule" proposal by Judge Hofstadter (January 19, 1951). Other correspondence relating to the Yeshiva Rabbi Joseph Konvitz and personal matters. Also a copy of the "Certificate of Incorporate of the Bernard Heller Foundation, Incorporated."
Box 16 Folder 6 1946-1956
Detailed correspondence with Professor Will Herberg, Drew University, on issues relating to Jewish ethics and history, theology, and Israel. Also detailed correspondence about lectures, articles, and personal matters.
Box 16 Folder 7 1957-1972
1957-1964, 1968, 1972. Konvitz asked Herberg to consider coming to Cornell for the academic year 1959-1960 as a visiting professor, and lecturing in Professor Konvitz's American Ideals course while Konvitz is on sabbatical (January 30, 1958). Konvitz mentions that he is planning a course or seminar for the spring semester of 1960-1961 that will focus mainly on the relations between labor and religion (November 7, 1960). Other personal correspondence.
Box 16 Folder 8 1963-1978
1963-1964, 1967-1968, 1974-1975, 1977-1978. Correspondence with Professor Herbert Hill, Industrial Relations Research Institute at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and former National Labor Director of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, relative to Konvitz's comments on Hill's manuscripts and the arrangements for visits by Hill to lecture to Konvitz's and other professors' classes in the Industrial and Labor Relations and Law Schools.
Box 16 Folder 9 1967-1979
1967-1976, 1978-1979. Correspondence with Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg, President of the American Jewish Congress. Konvitz agrees to participate in a dialogue on Jewishness and the creative process as part of the April 1976 Bicentennial National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. Konvitz was a member of the Governing Council of the American Jewish Congress (April 2, 1974). Konvitz nominated Hertzberg to become a member of the Cornell Board of Trustees (February 20, 1974). Copy of a letter from William E. Simon, the Secretary of the United States Treasury, to Hertzberg on Simon's position and that of the Treasury Department on the Arab Boycott and other related issues (May 3, 1975). Also correspondence between Konvitz and Hertzberg on the Journal of Jewish Social Studies; the Conference on Jewish Social Studies; the American Jewish Congress; and their articles and other publications.
Box 16 Folder 10 1946-1949
Personal correspondence with Max J. Herzberg, Principal of Weequahic High School, Newark, New Jersey, and a member of the Executive Committee of the National Council of Teachers of English, regarding routine publication matters relating to an essay on "American Legal Writings" that Doctor Konvitz wrote for a volume Herzberg was editing on American literature. Also routine personal correspondence.
Box 16 Folder 11 1965
Letters from Rabbi Benjamin M. Kahn, National Director of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations; a copy of a news release and a memorandum to Hillel Directors from Kahn, relative to a grant from Professor and Mrs. Benjamin Siegel to Cornell to found a special Book Fund for the purchase of Hebrew and Yiddish language and literature books for Hillel Libraries. The grant was made as a result of Konvitz's initiative.
Box 16 Folder 12 1966-1968
1966, 1968. A letter to Doctor Konvitz from Rabbi Kahn and copies of correspondence between Kahn and the Siegels on the latter's contributions to the Hillel Foundation for the purchase of books.
Box 16 Folder 13 1965-1966
Letters from Rabbi Kahn. Professor Konvitz accepted nomination to membership on the B'nai B'rith Hillel Commission (January 3, 1966). Also minutes of the December 8, 1965 meeting of the Executive Committee of the National Hillel Commission.
Box 16 Folder 14 1969
Confidential memorandums from Rabbi Kahn to members of the Hillel Commission and routine materials regarding Hillel affairs and activities. Also the "B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation's Citation of Service" certificate to Doctor Konvitz.
Box 16 Folder 15 1969-1980
1969, 1974-1975, 1978-1980. Personal correspondence with Hillel Foundation officers including Doctor Alfred Jaspe, National Director
Box 16 Folder 16 1965-1968
[1966] 1965-1968. Correspondence with Hillel Foundation officers on Hillel matters
Box 16 Folder 17 1946-1954
1946-1951, 1954. Personal correspondence with Herman D. Hillman, National Housing Agency.
Box 16 Folder 18 1965-1979
1965-1968, 1971, 1973-1977, 1979. Letter from Sarah Morris, Executive Director of the American Histadrut Culture Exchange Institute, regarding Konvitz's agreement to chair a panel discussion on "Israel: The Next Decade" on November 4, 1973 at the Annual Convention of the National Committee for Labor Israel (October 3, 1973). Also included are minutes and memorandums of the Board of Directors, the Executive Committee, and other committees reports and other related materials. Konvitz was also a member of the Institute's Board of Trustees.
Box 16 Folder 19 1951-1965
1951-1953, 1955-1956, 1958, 1962, 1964-1965. Correspondence with Louis Hollander, Secretary-Treasurer of the New York State American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations and a Trustee of Cornell University, regarding personal matters and university affairs.
Box 16 Folder 20 1949
Personal correspondence with Marion G. Holley, one of Konvitz's former students
Box 16 Folder 21 1965-1989
1965-1969, 1971, 1973-1975, 1977-1989. Correspondence with Professor Sidney Hook, Department of Philosophy at New York University. Konvitz and Hook discuss scholarly and social issues in detail. This correspondence includes discussions regarding secular humanism (November 9, 1980); discrimination against hiring Jewish professors by prestigious American colleges and universities (March 12, 1979); student activism on American campuses; black activism at Cornell (January 19, 1969); the trial which Bertrand Russell, Sartre, and other Europeans were planning to stage in opposition to the war in Vietnam (August 19, 1966); and Hook's detailed criticisms of chapters of Konvitz's Expanding Liberties. Also includes comments on each other's publications, papers, and addresses. Includes related materials such as reprints and personal correspondence.
Box 16 Folder 22 1960-1964
[1960- ] 1960-1964. Correspondence with Hook on legal issues and publications. Konvitz and Hook discuss legal issues including expatriation cases, jurisprudence, constitutional liberties, preferred and strategic freedoms, Supreme Court justices, Congressional power to override Court rulings, and the statute of limitation on the charge of conspiring to organize a Communist party. Correspondence includes scholarly discussions of Konvitz's monograph, Aspects of Liberty (February 18, 1962) and Hook's The Paradoxes of Freedom (January 22, 1962). Also correspondence on the work and control of the New Leader magazine (January 6, 1961), and on personal matters.
Box 16 Folder 23 1946-1959
Scholarly and detailed correspondence with Professor Sidney Hook relating to segregation, discrimination, and principles of civil liberties (December 10, 1957; February 29, 1948; and March 19, 1948); the "United States Bill of Rights" (November 22, 1957); and the Executive Committee of the American Committee for Cultural Freedom (April 27, 1954). Correspondence on social and scholarly topics, including the publication of Professor Horace Kallen's Festschrift; and on personal matters.
Box 16 Folder 24 1950-1965
1950, 1958, 1962-1965
Box 16 Folder 25 1947-1949
1947, 1949. Personal correspondence with Doctor Bryn J. Hovde, President of the New School for Social Research.
Box 16 Folder 26 1948
Literary correspondence with the editors of the Hudson Review
Box 16 Folder 27 1967-1969
1967, 1969. Correspondence with Professor Irving Howe, City University of New York, relative to Howe's project to write a book on the development of secular Jewish life in the United States between 1880 and World War II - The Jewish Experience 1890-1950. Also correspondence from Howe regarding routine activities and work of the Jewish Labor Committee (July 22, 1969) and the Young People's Socialist League.
Box 16 Folder 28 1947-1953
1947-1949, 1951, 1953. Correspondence with Henry Hurwitz, editor of the Menorah Journal. Includes detailed correspondence about Doctor Konvitz's reviews for the Journal. Copy of a letter from Hurwitz to the editor of Commentary in response to a critical letter to Commentary by Konvitz, commenting on Hurwitz's article, "Towards a Noble Community," in The Menorah Journal of Autumn 1948 (September 14, 1949). Also personal correspondence.
Box 16 Folder 29 1949
Letter from Rabbi Ario S. Hyams, the Jewish Community Center, Teaneck, New Jersey. Hyams responds to Konvitz's Commentary article, "A Plea for Religious Freedom in Israel" (October 1, 1949)
Box 16 Folder 30 1961-1981
1961, 1963, 1966, 1968, 1971-1981. Correspondence with Edwin Young, Secretary-Treasurer of the Industrial Relations Research Association, on Konvitz's nomination for election to the Executive Board (May 23, 1955). Correspondence with G. Israel, Secretary-General of the Alliance Israelite Universelle, on the AIU's (?) history and its relations to its counterparts in Germany, England, and the United States (June 27, 1974). Personal correspondence with George S. Ives, Chairman of the National Mediation Board (December 31, 1974).
Box 16 Folder 31 1947-1959
1947-1948, 1950-1953, 1955-1959. Correspondence with J. Anthony Marcus, President of the Institute of Foreign Trades, regarding Konvitz's January 1, 1956 letter in the New York Times. Doctor Konvitz argues against governmental censorship of Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR) publications. Konvitz also comments that it is possible to fight against Communism without joining a "crusade" (January 9, 1956). Correspondence with Roger N. Baldwin.
Box 16 Folder 32 1956-1967
1956, 1958, 1961, 1963, 1966-1967. Correspondence with Saul L. Sherman, Executive Secretary of the American Fund for Free Jurists (February 7, 1966). Personal correspondence with Morris Iuschewitz, Secretary-Treasurer of the New York City Congress of Industrial Organizations Council, member of the New York City Board of Education, and Trustee of the New York State University.
Box 17 Folder 1 1946-1952
1946-1947, [1950] 1952. Correspondence with several people including Jack Barbash, staff Director of the United States senate Subcommittee on Labor Management Relations; Martin P. Catherwood, Dean of the Industrial and Labor Relations School; Jacob Seidenberg, Industrial and Labor Relations graduate research assistant; and R.W. Fleming, Director of the Industrial Relations Center at the University of Wisconsin, about Konvitz's direction of a study of the use of the injunction in labor disputes in the New York City metropolitan area since the adoption of the Little Norris-La Guardia Act; and about aspects of the broader study, by the United States Subcommittee on Labor-Management Relations of the Senate Committee on Labor and Public Welfare, of the use of the injunction in labor disputes by state courts. The correspondence, memorandums, and reports provide detailed information about Konvitz's project and other areas of the Subcommittee's study. Also correspondence between Dean Catherwood and United States Senator James E. Murray, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Labor-Management Relations, on the participation of the Industrial and Labor Relations School in the study (April 1950). In addition to a number of reports and a bibliography on labor injunctions, there is a copy of "A proposal for a Workshop in Group Relations in Union Administration and Collective Bargaining."
Box 17 Folder 2 1950-1951
Correspondence with various people including Jack Barbash, Dean Catherwood, and Jacob Seidenberg relative to the study of the use of the injunction in labor disputes by courts in certain areas of New York state. The project included a quantitative study of the court records of New York and Kings Counties with the purpose of uncovering all the labor injunctions which were litigated from 1935 to June 1950. Also, the project included a study of the impact of the injunctions on collective bargaining relationships, which was accomplished by interviewing prominent lawyers involved in labor practice and by conducting some case studies of situations in which the injunction had been used. The study was included in the Senate Report, "State Court Injunctions," Senate Document Number 7, Eighty-First Congress, Second Session. Jacob Seidenberg conducted the study under Konvitz's supervision. Other material related to the Subcommittee's injunction study.
Box 17 Folder 3 1951
Correspondence with Joseph Dye, Industrial and Labor Relations research assistant, relative to the study of labor injunction cases in Niagara and Erie Counties. Konvitz also wrote letters to several labor attorneys in these counties introducing Dye and asking them to grant Dye an interview in order to ascertain their views as to the efficiency of the Little Norris-La Guardia Act in New York State. Konvitz explained that Dye's study was being conducted independently of the United States Senate and for the Industrial and Labor Relations School's own use (July 1951).
Box 17 Folder 4 1970
Routine correspondence with persons at the Institute for the Future, and Konvitz's participation in the Institute surveys.
Box 17 Folder 5 1963-1964
Correspondence with Arthur I. Waskow, Peace Research Institute Fellow
Box 17 Folder 6 1947-1950
Personal correspondence from Oscar I. Janowsky, Chairman of the Provisional Academic Council of the Jewish Museum, asking Doctor Konvitz to join the Council, which is sponsored by the Jewish Theological Seminary of America (October 31, 1949). Correspondence with Doctor Louis Finkelstein, President of the Jewish Theological Seminary and President of the Institute for Religious and Social Studies, about Finkelstein's criticisms of Konvitz's paper, "Judaism and the Democratic Ideal," which Konvitz prepared for the volume, Judaism and the Jews (February 17, 1947). Correspondence with Professor R.M. MacIver, Department of Sociology at Columbia University, relative to Konvitz's lecture at the Institute on "The Cost of Discrimination to the United States: The Domestic Scene, Law" on December 9, 1947. Also personal correspondence with Finkelstein.
Box 17 Folder 7 1947-1965
[1947-1963] 1965. Correspondence with Professor Philip G. Frank, Harvard University and President of the Institute for the Unity of Science; other members of the Board of Trustees; and persons involved in the affairs and activities of the Institute.
Box 17 Folder 8 1947-1976
1947-1952, 1962-1963, 1965, 1967, 1969-1973, 1975- 1976. Correspondence with members of the Board of trustees of the Institute; and other persons regarding the Institute's financial affairs.
Box 17 Folder 9 1950-1971
1950, 1952, 1960, 1962-1971. Correspondence with various people regarding the activities and financial affairs of the Institute. Correspondence with Professor Charles Morris, University of Florida and President of the Institute, relative to its future. It was decided to merge the Institute with the Minnesota Center for Philosophy (December 1, 1966). Related correspondence and materials.
Box 17 Folder 10 1965-1968
Bank account statements and cancelled checks
Box 17 Folder 11 1970-1976
The Institute was legally dissolved on February 22, 1973 and its assets were turned over to the Philosophy of Science Association, East Lansing, Michigan, in June 1976. Correspondence and financial documents regarding the affairs and dissolution of the Institute.
Box 17 Folder 12 1970-1976
Correspondence and legal and financial documents relating to the dissolution of the Institute and the assignment of its assets to the Philosophy of Science Association.
Box 17 Folder 13 1947-1961
1947, 1950-1955, 1957, 1959-1961. Correspondence and financial documents relative to the financial affairs of the Institute.
Box 17 Folder 14 1946-1950
1946-1947, 1949-1950. Routine correspondence with Doctor John Collier, President of the Institute of Ethnic Affairs, Incorporated; and Doloris Coulter, editor, about Doctor Konvitz's publications.
Box 17 Folder 15 1948-1958
[1948-1949] 1951-1952, 1958. Correspondence with officers of the Institute on Church and State, Incorporated, on the preparation of a pamphlet on separation of church and state by Konvitz for the Institute. In a memo to Professors Kallen and Norton, and R. Lawrence Siegel, Konvitz explains that he treated only the question of broad principle in his pamphlet and that he intended it to strongly conflict with the positions of the Catholic Church (June 10, 1948). Siegel informs Konvitz that the Board of Directors of the Institute decided not to publish or distribute Konvitz's manuscript because its text and approach did not conform to their ideas (October 25, 1948).
Box 17 Folder 16 1972
Routine correspondence from the Ad Hoc Committee for Intellectual Freedom. Konvitz is a sponsor of the Committee.
Box 17 Folder 17 1957-1962
1957-1958, 1960-1962. Detailed correspondence with David S. Blanchard, Deputy Director of the International Labor Office, Washington Branch, in regard to the possibility of the International Labour Organization assisting in the establishment of an Institute or Department of Labor Studies at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. Professor Konvitz explains that he was commissioned by the University to attempt to devise a plan for the establishment of a labor studies department or institute devoted to teaching, research, and extension. Correspondence with David A. Morse, Director-General of the International Labour Organization, about internships with the International Labour Organization for students in the Industrial and Labor Relations School's International Labor Training Program. Konvitz and Morse arranged for a student to participate in an internship with the International Labour Organization Field Office in Mexico City in 1962. Other correspondence between Konvitz and Morse relative to arrangements for Professor Ronald Donovan to meet with Morse and other people at the International Labour Organization to discuss the International Labor Training Program; and the need for trained American trade union personnel in the international field; and the prospective role of Cornell in such an undertaking (February 1962). Also correspondence with Morse regarding routine personal matters.
Box 17 Folder 18 1965-1974
Correspondence with publishers, journals, law schools, and sponsors of conferences inviting Doctor Konvitz to make submissions. Letter from Lewis Mumford, thanking Konvitz for his "perceptive and penetrating" review in the December 19, 1970 Saturday Review of Mumford's book, The Myth and the Machine: The Pentagon of Power (December 21, 1970). Correspondence with Paul Kurtz, Editor of The Humanist. Konvitz responded to a request by Kurtz to answer three questions regarding campus turmoil, student power, violence, and how universities should react (January 22, 1969). The Humanist printed Professor Konvitz's answers in its May/June 1969 issue. Copy of a letter by Konvitz to the editor of The New York times in which Konvitz responds that he would not be affected by campus demonstrations against the war in Vietnam (October 14, 1969).
Box 18 Folder 1 1965
Letters from Doctor Norman Greenwald to Doctor Konvitz and Greenwalds memorandum about the establishment of an international college in Israel. Minutes of the founding meeting of the American College in Israel (May 31, 1965). Konvitz is listed as a founding member.
Box 18 Folder 2 1964-1973
1964 [1966-1973]. Correspondence with Zvi Bar-Niv, President of the National Labor Court; Professor Alexander M. Dushkin, Hebrew University; Rabbi Doctor A. Carlebach, Niv Hamidrashia magazine; Doctor Israel Goldstein, former President of the American Jewish Congress; Abraham Harman, President of the Hebrew University; Yitzhak Lear, Consul General of Israel in New York; Shabtai Rosenne, Ambassador to the Permanent Mission of Israel to the United Nations; Professor Jacob L. Talmon; Doctor I.E. Nebenzahl, State Comptroller of Israel; Michael Shiloh, Consul for Educational Affairs at the Consulate General of Israel in New York; Yehuda Ben-David, Director of the Instructional Center at the Prime Minister's Office; David Ben-Dov, Consul General of Israel at San Francisco; Teddy Kollek, Mayor of Jerusalem; and Doctor Nahum Goldman, President of the Jewish agency for Israel. Correspondence with these persons and other Israelis regard affairs of their offices and some personal matters. Also a form letter to Konvitz from Jacob K. Javits and Abraham A. Ribcoff, Co-General Chairmen of the American Committee for Israel's Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Celebration, asking Konvitz to serve on their Committee (March 7, 1973) (Some of the correspondence is in Hebrew).
Box 18 Folder 3 1954-1985
1954, 1957-1958, 1960-1965, [1969. 1985]. Correspondence with Doctor David Ben-Dov, Israeli Consul to the United States, about the arrangements for the visit of Ambassador Harman to Cornell on September 13, 1962; on the dismissal, on academic grounds, of an Israeli student (September 22, 1961); and on arrangements for Konvitz to guest lecture at Hebrew University (May 1961), and to study labor relations in Israel and, particularly, the Histadrut. Notes by Konvitz on the Histadrut regarding attitudes of workers and management toward workers on management councils. Letter to Doctor Konvitz from Zalman Shazar, President of Israel. Shazar mentions his visit to Cornell and his discussions with Konvitz, particularly on the problems of Jewish education. Shazar also mentions that he has lately been thinking of Konvitz in connection with the widespread debate on a number of articles by Hannah Ahrendt. Letters from Doctor Jacob I. Hartstein, Chairman of the Inter-University Committee on Israel. Konvitz became a member of the Committee (October 30 and September 17, 1962). (Some correspondence in Hebrew). Also routine personal letter from President Chaim Herzog, August 19, 1985.
Box 18 Folder 4 1970-1973
1970, 1972-1973. Routine administrative documents
Box 18 Folder 5 1960-1965
[1960-1962] 1965. Correspondence with Doctor David Ben-Dov, Education Attache of Israel to the United States, about the visit to the United States and lecture at Cornell University on February 8, 1962.
Box 18 Folder 6 1957
Correspondence with Doctor Norman Abrams of the Israeli Law Project at Harvard University (October 28, 1957)
Box 18 Folder 7 1969-1970
Box 18 Folder 8 1951-1956
1951, 1955-1956. Personal correspondence with Ithacans. Also correspondence relative to concerns of Ithaca's Jewish community.
Box 18 Folder 9 1946-1958
1946, 1948-1949, 1951-1953, 1955-1958. Correspondence with Irving M. Ives, United States Senator and former Dean of the Industrial and Labor Relations School. Letter from Ives informing Konvitz that an enclosed letter (not in the file) is the formal notification of Konvitz's appointment to the staff of the Industrial and Labor Relations School (July 26, 1946). Other correspondence with Ives relative to recommendations from Konvitz on behalf of other people and on personal matters.
Box 18 Folder 10 1946-1959
1946-1955, 1957, 1959. Correspondence with R. Jespersen regarding public schools or high schools teaching non-sectarian religion (February 4, 1947). Correspondence with Jacob Pat, Executive Secretary of the Jewish Labor Committee. Pat writes (in Hebrew) his recollections of Konvitz's grandfather (August 1959). Personal correspondence with Leonard B. Job, President of Ithaca College (May 4, 1955). Correspondence with Doctor Charles S. Johnson, President of Fisk University, relative to academic matters (1950-1955). Personal letters to George M. Johnson, member of the Federal Civil Rights Commission and Dean of Howard University Law School (January 20, 1947 and June 9, 1959). Correspondence from the Jewish Statistical Bureau. Includes a confidential report of official conferences in Washington on the "Present Status of Federal Census of Religious Groups - Census of Jews" (January 30, 1948). Also a copy of a statement by S. Ralph Lazrus, Chairman of the Jewish Statistical Bureau, regarding the affairs of the Bureau (September 4, 1947). Correspondence with Professor Howard Mumford Jones, Harvard University, about each other's scholarly works. Brief outlines of a book on the American Constitution and a book on the Bill of Rights that Konvitz proposed writing for the Home University Library. Jones presented Professor Konvitz's outlines to the Oxford University Press (May 22, 1947). Other personal correspondence.
Box 18 Folder 11 1950-1981
1950, 1954, 1957, 1960-1971, 1974-1981. Personal correspondence from Abner I. Jaffe, assistant Superintendent of the New York City Board of Education, on the Yeshiva of Flatbush, Brooklyn, New York (March 3, 1960). Correspondence with United States Senator Jacob Javits. Javits asks Konvitz to become an honorary committee member for a tribute to persons who have contributed most to American and world Jewry. Javits was the honorary chairman and the tribute was sponsored by the Jewish Braille Institute of America (October 22, 1974). Other routine correspondence with Javits. Correspondence from Jacob Sheinkman, President of the Jewish Labor Committee. Sheinkman, Chairman of the Eighty-Fifth Birthday Tribute to George Meany, asks Konvitz to become a member of the Sponsoring Committee of a project involving the writing of a publication interpreting Meany's role in the cause of human rights (May 4, 1979). Correspondence with Doctor H.J. Linfield, Executive Secretary of the Jewish Statistical Bureau. Confidential memorandums of the Bureau to the National Council for Statistics on Jews regarding the United States Census Bureau's proposal that it periodically compile socio-economic statistics on American religious groups. Konvitz comments that he is opposed to a question on religion in the United States Census, opposed to a question on religion in the United States Census, whether voluntary or mandatory, because he believes that such a question violates the religious clause of the First Amendment (June 10, 1966). Personal correspondence with Professor Howard Mumford Jones, Department of English at Harvard University (1965-1966, 1979). Other personal correspondence.
Box 18 Folder 12 1948-1955
1948-1950, 1952, 1955. Personal correspondence with a former student
Box 18 Folder 13 1947-1961
1947-1948, 1950, 1952, 1957, 1959-1961. Personal correspondence with Nathan Jacobs, Associate Justice of the New Jersey State Supreme Court.
Box 18 Folder 14 1953-1979
1953, 1955-1956, 1958-1966, 1977, 1979. Correspondence with Professor Oscar I. Janowsky, the City College, on publications and the survey of the Commission for the Study of Jewish Education in the United States. Konvitz replaced Janowsky as the Chairman of the Commission when Janowsky resigned. Also personal correspondence.
Box 18 Folder 15 1964-1980
1964-1967, 1969, 1971, 1973-1980. Correspondence with Doctor Abraham Burstein, Secretary of the Academy regarding affairs of the Academy. Doctor Konvitz drafted the by-laws for the academy (February 23, 1966). Konvitz addressed the Academy on "A New Constitutional Liberty" on June 2, 1964 (February 18, 1964). Konvitz was elected as a fellow of the Academy on January 28, 1964 (January 29, 1964). Konvitz was also elected as Second Vice-President of the Academy (March 3, 1967). Other correspondence regarding Academy affairs. Also copies of the by-laws and certificate of incorporation of the Academy and other routine related materials.
Box 18 Folder 16 1963-1970
1963-1968, 1970. Correspondence with Isadore Hamlin, Executive Director of the Jewish Agency - American Section, about the Agency's annual grants to the Hebrew Culture Foundation, of which Doctor Konvitz was chairman. Correspondence with Rose L. Halprin, Chairman of the Jewish Agency - American Section regarding an article by Professor W.T. Mallison Junior on "Jewish peoplehood, nationality, entity, etcetera." Halprin asks Konvitz for his advice on a rejoiner to Mallison's article, and on long-range strategy to challenge the position expressed by Mallison and the Council for Judaism (October 21, 1964). Konvitz agrees with Halprin and favorably responds to her suggestion that a scholarly document on this question be written. Konvitz recommends Professors Louis Henkin and Michael N. Cardozo to prepare the legal aspects of the paper and Professor Ben Halpern and Oscar Janowsky to prepare the paper's historical arguments (October 26, 1964). Copies of letters that Halprin wrote to Phillips Talbot, Assistant Secretary of State for Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs, about statements by the American Council for Judaism, taken from a reply by Talbot to a letter from the Council on the subject of "the juridicial basis of Jewish peoplehood" (May 15 and June 29, 1964). A few other Agency materials including an "Agreement for the Reconstruction of the Jewish Agency for Israel" (February 23, 1970).
Box 18 Folder 17 1954-1961
Correspondence with Doctor Samuel Blumenfield, Department of Education and Culture of the Jewish Agency for Israel. Professor Konvitz reviews projects (including an exchange of professors between American and Israeli colleges and universities, and support for graduate students to conduct field work and research in Israel) in which the Foundation should consider becoming involved (November 1, 1957). Other correspondence with Blumenfield about speaking engagements by Konvitz on the Agency's behalf and other routine matters.
Box 18 Folder 18 1967
Correspondence with Max Stern, President of the Jewish Center, relative to the Center's invitation to attend a dinner n honor of Rabbi Leo Jung, as a guest of the Center, because of Konvitz's friendship with Jung (March 8, 1967).
Box 18 Folder 19 1947-1964
1947-1949, 1954-1960, 1964. Correspondence with Samuel D. Freeman, Director of the Jewish Center Lecture Bureau of the National Jewish Welfare Board, about requests by various groups and organizations for Professor Konvitz to lecture
Box 18 Folder 20 1976-1980
Correspondence with Doctor Edward B. Shils and Professor A. Leo Levin, Presidents of the Society, regarding the affairs of the Society
Box 18 Folder 21 1955-1965
1955-1956, 1958, 1962-1965. Correspondence with Professor Oscar I. Janowsky on the chapter on inter-group problems which Konvitz wrote for Janowsky's book, The American Jew. Also other correspondence on books published by the Jewish Publication Society.
Box 18 Folder 22 1965-1977
1965-1966, 1969-1972, 1977. Correspondence with Lesser Zussman, Executive Director of the Jewish Publication Society, regarding routine matters with respect to new Ithaca memberships solicited by Konvitz. Related materials.
Box 18 Folder 23 1965-1975
Correspondence with Jerome J. Shestack, President of the Jewish Publication Society. Doctor Konvitz suggests that the Jewish Publication Society apply to the Charles E. Merrill Trust for a grant of $50,000. Correspondence with Doctor Chaim Potok, Editor of the Jewish Publication Society, relative to suggestions for publication projects. Correspondence with other officers at the Jewish Publication Society, including Doctor Solomon Grayzel, Editor; and Lesser Zussman, Executive Director.
Box 18 Folder 24 1963-1976
1963-1972, 1974, 1976. Detailed correspondence with Doctor Eli Goldstein, President of Jewish Teachers Seminary and People's University - Herzliah Hebrew Teachers Institute, about its proposed programs and the accreditation of the Institution (June-October, 1974). Correspondence with Professor Meir Ben-Horin, Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah, regarding the Horace M. Kallen lecture. Doctor Konvitz delivered the first Horace M. Kallen Annual Lecture (March 12, 1971). Konvitz delivered the address at the Institute's Commencement Exercises on March 25, 1969 (June 5, 1969). The text of the address (June 25, 1969) is included. Minutes and proposals of the Academic Advisory Council and of the National Board of Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah. Konvitz is a member of the Council.
Box 18 Folder 25 1954
Program of Rutgers University's "Convocation in Recognition of the Tercentenary of Jewish Culture in North America" on November 7, 1954. At the Convocation Konvitz received an honorary degree from Rutgers. Related articles and newspaper clippings.
Box 18 Folder 26 1954-1955
Correspondence with officers of the American Jewish Tercentenary regarding routine activities of the organization in relation to the Tercentenary celebration. Konvitz was appointed as the Chairman of the Ithaca Tercentenary Committee (October 27, 1954). Pamphlets, bulletins, articles, and other materials regarding the Tercentenary celebration.
Box 19 Folder 1 1952-1959
1952, 1953-1959. Correspondence with Doctor Louis regarding Finkelstein, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, about Finkelstein's offer of deanship and professorship to Doctor Konvitz. Konvitz explains that his reasons for refusing the offer are that he prefers to remain a teacher and scholar. Konvitz comments that a professorship at Cornell is better suited than is the dean/professorship offered by the Seminary, for his work and the style of life that is most congenial to it. Konvitz describes in detail his conception of a deanship which involves devotion to the operation of the institution (June 27, 1958). Also correspondence regarding lectures delivered by Konvitz at the Seminary (1956- 1958)
Box 19 Folder 2 1964
[Spring 1964]. In "Remarks by Milton R. Konvitz at Meeting of Evaluation Team with Board of Directors of the Seminary at the Jewish Museum" (March 10, 1964). Konvitz comments on the financial state of the Seminary and the status of its physical plant. Several reports and other documents describing the Seminary's library, educational programs, and finances.
Box 19 Folder 3 1963-1964
[Spring 1964] 1963-1964. Correspondence with Doctor S.D.S. Spragg, Dean of the University Council on Graduate Studies of the University of Rochester and a member of the evaluation team for the Seminary, regarding Spragg's report on graduate work at the Seminary. Konvitz agrees with Spragg's report, a copy of which is included (March 17, 1964).
Box 19 Folder 4 1966-1980
1966-1977, 1979-1980. Correspondence with Doctor Gerson O. Cohen, Chancellor of the Seminary, regarding lectures and other scholarly matters. Konvitz comments on a statement by Justice Thurgood Marshall regarding rule of law in ancient Israel with respect to homicide. Konvitz believes that a scholarly study should be undertaken (July 27, 1972). Personal correspondence with Doctor Louis Finkelstein, Chancellor of the Seminary. Doctor Cohen, and Professor Abraham J. Heschel. Other correspondence relative to the Seminary and a January 30, 1979 "Report of the Commission for the Study of the Ordination of Women as Rabbis."
Box 19 Folder 5 1960-1969
1960-1962, 1964-1965, 1969. Correspondence with Doctor Louis Finkelstein, Chancellor; Doctor Bernard Mandelbaum, President; Doctor Saul Liebeman, Rector; and Professor A.I. Heschel regarding mostly routine matters concerning the Seminary.
Box 19 Folder 6 1969
Copy of a speech by Tom Jones, a black Cornell student. Jones delivered the speech at Willard Straight Hall on June 29, 1969 on the events that preceded and reasons for the occupation of Willard Straight Hall. Jones discussed race relations and the attitudes of black students and of the Black Liberation Front at Cornell.
Box 19 Folder 7 1950-1962
1950-1959, 1961-1962. Correspondence with several people responsible for the establishment and publication of Judaism including Doctor Robert Gordis, Chairman of the Board of Editors; Will Herberg, Editor; Irving Miller, President of the American Jewish Congress; and Doctor David Petegorsky, Executive Director of the Congress. Detailed correspondence on arrangements for the establishment of the journal. Routine correspondence regarding Konvitz's own articles in Judaism. Minutes of the Board of Editors. Konvitz was a member of its Board and one of the three principal co-founders.
Box 19 Folder 8 1963-1965
Correspondence with Doctor Leo Jung, Rabbi at the New York City Jewish Center and Professor of Ethics at Yeshiva University. Includes scholarly discussions on the freedom of interpretation of Jewish legal texts (March 16, 1964). Also personal correspondence.
Box 19 Folder 9 1966-1973
Correspondence with Doctor Leo Jung, Rabbi at the Jewish Center relative to the scholarly and organizational work in which both Jung and Konvitz were involved. Personal correspondence and correspondence about their publications.
Box 19 Folder 10 1973-1982
Correspondence with Rabbi Leo Jung relative to Jung's and Konvitz's work and publications. Personal correspondence.
Box 19 Folder 11 1963-1980
1963, 1965-1969, 1971-1980. Correspondence with Doctor Max M. Kampelman, Vice-Chairman of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, on publication matters and comments on articles by Kampelman and Konvitz. Correspondence with Jacob Katzman, Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah, on the merger of Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah with Touro College (April-May 1978). At Katzman's request, Konvitz agreed to serve as the Temporary Chairman of the Academic Advisory Committee of Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah until Katzman could find a permanent replacement for Professor Horace Kallen (June 3, 1974). Other correspondence with Katzman regarding the affairs of Jewish Teachers Seminary - Herzliah, Professor Horace Kallen, and personal matters. Correspondence with Doctor William R. Keast, Chairman of the Commission on Academic Tenure in Higher Education, regarding academic tenure. Correspondence with United States Senator Edward M. Kennedy. Kennedy mailed Konvitz a copy of a complaint he filed on August 9, 1972, in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, in an effort to obtain a juridical determination of the scope of the President's pocket veto power under the Constitution. Kennedy had previously discussed this issue with Doctor Konvitz (August 11, 1972). Konvitz refers to an item on the editorial page of the November 21, 1968 Cornell Daily Sun reporting that a trial judge had received a letter from Senator Kennedy attesting to a Syracuse man's character who was indicted for carrying a gun to the Robert Kennedy funeral mass (November 25, 1968). Kennedy informs Konvitz that he never wrote a letter to the New York Court on behalf of the defendant and that the only letter involving the defendant that Kennedy wrote to him was identical to the one he sent to every person who submitted suggestions for a Robert Kennedy Memorial (February 19, 1969). Kennedy asks Professor Konvitz to comment on the constitutional questions involved in the President's action in using the pocket veto to disapprove a bill (May 28, 1971). Letter from Senator Robert Kennedy asking Konvitz for his thoughts in the fields covered by his major committee assignments, Labor and Public Welfare and Government (November 17, 1966). Personal correspondence with Professor Gail Kennedy, Department of Philosophy and Religion at Amherst College (no date). Correspondence with Doctor Clark Kerr, President of the University of California, about Konvitz's and Kerr's coincidental use of the term "multiversity" in the titles of their works (November 1963). Correspondence with Leon H. Keyserling, former Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisors, on his statement, Recession, Inflation, and How to Overcome Both, being distributed by the Coalition for a Democratic Majority. Konvitz agrees to associate himself with the publication (January 9, 1975).
Box 19 Folder 12 1955-1965
1955-1956, 1958-1959, 1961-1962, 1964-1965. Letter from United States Senator Kenneth B. Keating about Keating's proposal for two Vice-Presidents. Keating thanks Konvitz for bringing to his attention a copy of Konvitz's letter to Senator Humphrey expressing support for Keating's proposal. Keating disagrees with Konvitz on going back to the Secretary of State and the rest of the Cabinet after the second Vice- President in the line of succession, but mentions that this is a minor difference (January 20, 1964). A letter from Keating thanking Konvitz for a copy of his telegram to Senator Eastland regarding several bills under consideration by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee (May 15, 1959). Letter to authorize the Atomic Energy Commission to construct overhead power lines. Konvitz comments that he wishes to associate himself with the arguments and position of Professor Kusch against the proposal. Copy of a letter from Professor P. Kusch to Senator Jacob K. Javits on the proposed legislation to authorize the Atomic Energy Commission to construct overhead power lines in Woodside, California (June 2, 1965). Correspondence with Professor Mordecai M. Kaplan, Founder of the Jewish Reconstructionist Foundation, Incorporated, on requests for Konvitz to contribute to the Reconstructionist (February 18, 1955). Konvitz agreed to serve on the Commission on Basic Zionist Ideology (September 11, 1958).
Box 19 Folder 13 1945-1959
Personal correspondence with David J. Kallen, the son of Professor Horace M. Kallen (1947-1948, 1954, 1957). Correspondence with Paul Kaminsky, President of Max Udell Sons and Company (March 20, 1951). Personal correspondence with H. Eliot Kaplan, Deputy Comptroller of New York State. Correspondence with Jack M. Kaplan, President of Welch Grape Juice Company. Professor Konvitz comments that Kaplan's arrangement for turning over the Welch Company to the National Cooperative Association represents an outstanding contribution to the perpetuation of small businessmen in the United States (September 4, 1956). Personal correspondence with Julius Kass, Counsel to the Division of Labor Relations of New York City (September 24, 1946). Correspondence with Professor Walter Kaufmann, Department of Philosophy at Princeton University, discussing Emerson and Nietzche (1954-1956). Correspondence with United States Congressman Robert W. Kean. Konvitz responds in detail to a request from Kean for help with a speech on labor legislation and Social Security before the New Jersey State Building and Construction Trades Council. Klean mentions that he lifted some parts of Konvitz's letter bodily and used them in his speech (May 8, 1958). Correspondence with Robert W. Kenny, President of the National Lawyers Guild; and Earl B. Dikerson, President of the National Bar Association. Konvitz agrees to act as an individual sponsor of a national conference of lawyers to consider the legal aspects of federal intervention in lynching cases (November 29, 1946). Correspondence with Leon H. Keyserling, Vice Chairman of the President's Council of Economic Advisors. Keyserling asks Konvitz for his ideas on interrelated studies between the Council on Economic Advisors and certain specialized types of educational institutions (February 11, 1947). Personal correspondence with Theodore W. Kheel, Director of the New York City Labor Relations Division. Personal correspondence with Doctor Laurence A. Kimpton, Chancellor of the University of Chicago. Personal correspondence with Philip M. Klutznick, President of B'nai B'rith. Klutzick comments that Konvitz's address "Zionism: Homecoming or Homelessness" discusses what is perhaps the most crucial problem of adjustment facing Jewish life (February 5, 1957). Correspondence with Rabbi Simon G. Kramer, Chairman of the Committee on Religious and Educational Participation of the American Jewish Tercentenary Committee. Konvitz agrees to serve on Kramer's Committee. Personal letter from Abner J. Kupperman, National Executive Director of the Joint Defense Appeal of the American Jewish Committee and Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith (June 10, 1957). Correspondence with others regarding personal and routine matters.
Box 19 Folder 14 1946-1980
1946, 1949, 1951, 1954-1955, 1959, 1961-1963, 1965-1971, 1973-1977, 1980. Routine academic correspondence with Professor William J. Kilgore, Chairman of the Department of Philosophy at Baylor University. Correspondence with Fred H. King, a former student, relating to church-state relations. Kinoy, Arthur, of Rutgers School of Law. Routine Correspondence. Konvitz participated in the amici curiae brief submitted on Kinoy's behalf in a case arising out of a conviction for disorderly conduct in his representation of witnesses called before the House Committee on Un-American Activities (1967-1968). Correspondence with Philip M. Klutznick, President of the World Jewish Congress and a former United States delegate to the United Nations, relating to Klutznick's article in the April 30, 1979 Christian Science Monitor on the importance of a dialogue between leaders of Islam ad leaders of world Jewry (May 1, 1979). Also routine personal correspondence with Klutznick. Correspondence with Professor Israel Knox, Philosophy Department of New York University, relating to personal matters. In a letter of recommendation on behalf of Knox for a promotion to a full professorship Konvitz describes the practices of the Law School and the School of Industrial and Labor Relations in making an appointment to a tenure position and a promotion from associate to full professor (September 25, 1969). Correspondence with Myron Kolatch, Executive Editor of The New Leader's issue on the events at Columbia University (June 20, 1968). Copy of a May 24, 1968 letter from Hook to Kolatch requesting that his name as a regular contributor be dropped from the masterhead. Personal correspondence with Professor Robert Koretz, Law School of Syracuse University. Also routine correspondence regarding lecture engagements.
Box 19 Folder 15 1971-1980
1971-1978, 1980. Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen, a founder and former dean of the New School for Social Research. Includes an in-depth exchange between Kallen and Konvitz on a broad range of subjects, including education for and about Jews and the importance of the Diaspora to the survival of Israel (February 12, 1974), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and Henry Kissinger's role in the government and abilities (January-February 1974). Other rich personal and philosophical insights in Kallen's letters. Also personal correspondence with Rachel O. Kallen, Professor Kallen's wife, and with Professor Miriam Kallen, his sister. Correspondence with Doctor John Everett, President of the New School for Social Research, Alfred J. Morrow, and others regarding routine affairs concerning Konvitz's involvement in matters pertaining to the Kallens.
Box 19 Folder 16 1948-1954
Detailed correspondence with Kallen regarding the Marcus Singer Defense Fund, the National Lawyers Guild and World War II conscientious objectors. Kallen informs Konvitz that he has suggested to Simon Sobeloff, United States Solicitor General, that he seek Konvitz's advice regarding the problem of defending civil liberties. Kallen praises Sobeloff, commenting that he is among the few Jews whose stand is uncompromising and who is yet able to combine courage and tact with principle (April 30, 1954). Konvitz comments on a meeting between himself and Maxwell Rabb in the White House offices. Konvitz mentions that his one and a half hour long interview with Rabb was entirely devoted to a discussion of the grievances of the Republican Party and the Eisenhower administration against American Jews. Doctor Konvitz believes that he straightened Rabb out on one or two important points. One extremely important point was the charge that American Jews determine their political activities and loyalties solely by the demands of Israeli politics. Konvitz pointed out that this was not the case regarding either Senator Taft or Senator McCarthy. Konvitz made it clear to Rabb that Zionism alone did not determine the political allegiance of American Jews. Konvitz mentions that he also made it clear to Rabb that the Republican Party has failed to win the respect and devotion of not only the Jews, but also the blacks. Also discussed were Konvitz's Liberian project, relations with the Labor Department, and the importance of relations of the New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations with unions. Konvitz mentions that the President of the New School has asked him if he is interested in succeeding Frieda Wunderlich as Dean of Graduate Faculty. Also Shad Polier asked Konvitz to become chairman of Law and Social Action. Konvitz declines both offers (November 20, 1953). Kallen discusses Ames' transactionalism (August 27, 1953), McCarthy's campaign against Communism (July 25 and May 8, 1953), and the Rosenbergs' conviction (July 10, 1953). Konvitz mentions that he has agreed to become involved in some labor disputes as a National Enforcement Commissioner of the Economic Stabilization Agency (May 7, 1953). Konvitz briefly comments on Professor Martin Buber's April 8, 1952 visit to Cornell, which Doctor Konvitz had arranged (April 9, 1952). Kallen comments that Jewish studies in colleges and universities should not be segregated in such academic departments as Semitic Departments or relegated to a Theological School. Also discussed is a labor dispute at Cornell as well as the American Jewish Congress. Konvitz mentions that he spoke in Philadelphia on civil rights under the auspices of the Philadelphia Fellowship Commission. Konvitz comments that the talk turned into a debate between Morris L. Ernst and himself. Konvitz also mentions that he is wondering whether he should resign as an officer of the American Association for Jewish Education because his continued affiliation and sometimes unpopular opinions might hinder its work. Kallen comments on Konvitz's speech to the American Council for Judaism. Kallen supports Konvitz's position (May 2 and 4, April 20 and 29, 1949, and others). Other correspondence with Kallen in which a number of other topics are discussed in detail including the American Jewish Congress, the American Association for Jewish Education, Konvitz's work and publications, Kallen's work and publications, American Zionism, Jewish education, American liberalism, "Judaism," McCarthyism, the New School and publications. Discussion of other issues including disarmament, theology, Kallen's humanism, the National Lawyers Guild, Sidney Hook, transactionalism, Abba Eban, national politics, and the politics and problems of the various committees in which they are involved. Personal correspondence.
Box 19 Folder 17 1946-1953
[1946-1948] 1950, 1953. Copy of a letter from Kallen to Doctor Alvin Johnson, New School, supporting the proposal of the Dutch government to establish Surinam as a refuge for 30,000 Jews. He also comments on the importance of establishing the Jewish National Home in Palestine and the failure of the British government to act responsibly and in good faith (March 21, 1948). Copy of a letter from Kallen to Senator Irving Ives regarding the appointment of the Chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission. Kallen supports the nomination of David E. Lilienthal as the Chairman of the Commission (February 26, 1947). Konvitz mentions that because the Industrial and Labor Relations School is understaffed, although no one is supposed to have more than six hours of teaching, he will have nine hours of teaching in addition to the editorship of the Industrial and Labor Relations Review quarterly (February 5, 1947). Other correspondence with Kallen regarding topics including intelligence, separation of church and state, the New School, Palestine, Morris Cohen, Sidney Hook, the American Association for Jewish Education and publications. Personal correspondence.
Box 20 Folder 1 1929-1948
Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen. An exchange of letters on the reaction of the Christian world to the Palestine situation (February 9, 1948). Kallen comments on Konvitz's letter to Lessing Rosenwald. Kallen believes that Rosenwald's motivation is that of the crowd - purely emotional. Kallen asks Konvitz to join him on the executive board of the Institute on Church and State and to prepare a pamphlet for it (February 6, 1948). Copy of a letter from Kallen to Billikopf; Kallen explains in detail how he came to the idea of cultural pluralism while he was an undergraduate at Harvard University (December 30, 1947). Kallen comments on the final sessions of the Presidential Commission on higher education, on which he is a member (November 6, 1947). Other correspondence in which Kallen discusses such topics as the New School, democracy for communication in school systems, cultural pluralism, the American Association for Jewish Education, Palestine, and the behavior and attitude of the Christian world to Jews. Correspondence regarding publication and personal matters. A The Jewish Tribune article by Kallen on "The Ways of Job: The 'Chosen People' Under the Christian Government of God with Man, Still Remain Outlaws from the Fellowship of Mankind" (August 2, 1929). Also, a July 4, 1929 Forward review of Kallen's book Frontiers of Hope - Outlook for Palestine Jewry - Old Settlements and New.
Box 20 Folder 2 1949-1952
Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen, including discussion of the fight for civil liberties (May 23, 1950), the Council for Judaism (March 21, 1952), Jewish living (August 5, 1951), and the New Leader (March 4, 1950). Correspondence regarding reviews and publication and personal matters including details of their work and daily and profound concerns, ideas, and activities.
Box 20 Folder 3 1955-1963
Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen. Professor Konvitz comments on Cornell, its library, and academic administration (October 11, 1962). Kallen discusses Jewish education (January 31, 1962), his suggestion to the Civil War Centennial Commission regarding a celebration of the Emancipation Proclamation. Doctor Konvitz mentions that George Sabine and Henry Myers were his two closest friends in Ithaca (January 3, 1961). Konvitz mentions that for the first time he has permitted his name to be used by a political party. While he has kept partisanship out of his classroom lectures, he comments that he told his American Ideals students that he intended to vote for Kennedy (November 3, 1960). Kallen recommended Konvitz for the position of president of the New School (October 3, 1960). Konvitz mentions that he was asked to chair a commission to be established by the American Jewish League for Israel to discuss a Zionist program for American Jews (September 28, 1960). Kallen comments on the study of science (April 21, 1959) and on Hand's lecture on the Bill of Rights (January 30, 1959). Kallen advises Konvitz not to accept the position of Dean of the Jewish Theological Seminary because he can accomplish more for the Jewish community and the American Idea by continuing his position at Cornell (June 20, 1958 and June 11, 1958). Kallen discusses the arms race and compares the conditions of the Soviet citizens with those of people in the United States (November 11, 1957). Copy of a letter from Kallen to Sidney Hook discussing in detail and at length philosophical questions in relation to the Lamont case (July 11, 1957). Copies of correspondence between Kallen and T.S. Eliot (November 12, 1954). Kallen marked the copies "Confidential. For your information." The correspondence concerns Eliot's reaction to an address by Kallen at the National Administrative Committee of the American Jewish Congress. Eliot asks Kallen to clarify his expression "American Idea" and why he is concerned with Jewish culture and apparently not at all with Jews. Eliot also expresses his concern about Kallen's reference to a religion of America (November 26, 1954). Kallen explains his concept of the "American Idea" and culture in detail and at length (December 23, 1954). Other correspondence between Konvitz and Kallen in which the details of their daily lives, attitudes, and thoughts are exchanged. While aspects of Konvitz's work, ideas, and attitudes are expressed by himself, most of the letters are from Kallen and reflect on Konvitz and are about ?Kallen's own concerns, including such topics as world events, American Jewry, Zionism, Jewish education, the American Association for Jewish Education, the American Jewish Congress, the New School for Social Research, the policies of the New Leader, the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and Communism, Sidney Hook, and philosophical and personal understandings of such experiences and concepts as death. Also, comments on each other's works and publications. Personal correspondence.
Box 20 Folder 4 1963-1965
[1963- ] 1963-1965. Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen. Kallen comments on apartheid in the United States. Kallen comments on the personality and work of Sidney Hook (May 6, 1963). Correspondence between Kallen and Konvitz which discusses issues related to their daily activities, thoughts, attitudes, and concerns, including such topics as T.S. Eliot's relation with Jews, education as an "inalienable right", the New School, the American Association for Jewish Education, the American Jewish Education, Catholicism, the Pope, theological questions, intermarriage (January 12, 1964), death, freedom, academe, American government policies, Israel, politics, philosophy, publications and scholarly works, Hannah Arendt's writings on the Eichmann trials, criticism of their works and routine publication matters. Personal correspondence.
Box 20 Folder 5 1965-1969
1966 - 1965-1969. Correspondence with Horace M. Kallen. Kallen comments in depth about aspects of his daily activities, concerns, attitudes, and ideas. The issues he discusses include: American involvement in the Vietnam War; alternatives to being drafted; black protests nationally and at Cornell; American domestic and international politics, the international policies and actions of the Soviet Union; Israel and the Arab countries; religious freedom and separation of church and state in the United States and Israel; the inclusion of questions on religion in the United States Census (October 14, 1967); the tensions and problems in the Middle East; the role of unions of city employees (February 17, 1968); philosophical concepts including peace and liberty; the role of the United States Supreme Court in making history (January 3, 1966); parenting (September 10, 1967); interpretation differences between Jewish and Christian perspectives regarding labor (November 10, 1966); the personalities and works of persons including Leo Jung, Bertrand Russell, Sidney Hook (September 25, 1967), Martin Luther King (April 7, 1967), Grenville Clark (February 20, 1966), and Rubin Gotesky; the politics and activities of organizations including the American Association for Jewish Education, the American Jewish Congress, Long Island University, the New School for Social Research, the Jewish Academy of Arts and Sciences, National Community Relations Advisory Council and the American Friends of Religious Freedom in Israel; his own papers, manuscripts, and lectures; his own classes; criticisms of Konvitz's work; comments on "Judaism." Also correspondence between Doctor Konvitz and contributors to the Horace Kallen Fund at the New School; Kallen's salary came from the Fund. Personal correspondence from Professor Rubin Gotesky to Konvitz with references to Kallen. Personal correspondence between Konvitz and Kallen.
Box 20 Folder 6 1968-1971
1968 [1969-1971]. Correspondence between Professor Konvitz and Kallen. Kallen discusses all aspects of his daily life, beliefs, concerns, attitudes, and ideas. The topics Kallen discusses include: Zionism (March 21, 1971); the domestic and international problems facing Israel; the conflicts and tensions in the Middle East; the political situation in China; Vietnam and American involvement in the Vietnam War; the Near East; the distinction between American democratism and Soviet Communism; Konvitz explains his support for neutralization of Israel on the pattern of Switzerland as a means of achieving peace( February 12, 1972 and November 20, 1971); Nixon; American domestic and international affairs; the black protest movement and Black activism at Cornell; anti-Semitism as a function of Christianity (February 7, 1969) and in the world; the role of the clergy in the black movement and in Jewish education and leadership; Humanist Judaism; the youth rebellion; academe (February 11, 1972); American philosophy (September 21, 1971); the nature of war and peace (November 20, 1971); Hobbes' notions of the social contract; pacifism (November 22, 1971); relevance (February 25, 1971); cooperatives (November 12, 1971); the Lamont Case (August 15, 1971 and January 1, 1971); the principles, research, and instruction regarding consumerism and cooperatives of the Rochdale Institute (January 10, 1971); the American Association for Jewish Education; the American Jewish Congress; the New School for Social Research; the Jewish Academy of Arts and Sciences; Dropsie and the Jewish Teachers Seminary (June 30, 1971); the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics; the relationship between William James and Henry James (February 17 and 26, 1972); Sidney Hook and Morris Cohen (January 1, 1971); Leo Jung; Abe Katsh; works by Konvitz; and publication matters. Kallen nominated Konvitz for the Board of Directors of the Rochdale Institute (January 16, 1972). Copy of a letter from Konvitz to Kallen in which Konvitz explains his position with respect to the Zionist Organization of America and mentions that he expects to join the American Zionist Federation (March 24, 1971). Copy of a personal letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Kallen (July 28, 1971). Poem by Kallen about open mindedness (January 9, 1971). Personal correspondence from Kallen and correspondence between Konvitz and others regarding publication matters concerning Kallen's book.
Box 20 Folder 7 1971-1973
Correspondence with Professor Horace M. Kallen. Kallen discusses in depth all aspects of his daily life, thoughts, emotions, and ideas. The topics Kallen discusses include: black activism and academic freedom (November 4 and 23, 1973); desegregation and the generation gap (December 23, 1973); the Arab-Israeli conflict (December 6, 1972) and the Middle East; world events and American international and domestic policies; Kissinger; Nixon; Jewish education; the Jewish Teachers Seminary (June 30, 1973); the American Association for Jewish Education; the Rochdale Institute; the interchange between Judaism and Hellenism (May 29, 1973); the relationship between Henry James and William James (May 3, 1972); the philosophy of oceonic education (February 24, 1973); Alain Locke (October 26, 1973); Emerson (March 9, 1973); and William Birenbaum. Personal correspondence and miscellaneous related materials such as article reprints.
Box 20 Folder 8 1972-1973
Correspondence with publishers, Kallen, Alfred J. Marrow, and Professor Rubin Gotesky regarding matters relating to the publication of Kallen's books. Also, a copy of a letter from Kallen to Paul Kurtz and Edwin H. Wilson of The Humanist explaining his reasons for not signing the Humanist Manifesto II.
Box 21 Folder 1 1967
Correspondence with persons whom Konvitz solicited each year for contributions to the Horace Kallen Chair Fund. From the Fund, Kallen was paid his salary by the New School for Social Research from 1952 until his death in 1974. Correspondence with Alfred J. Marrow regarding Kallen's retirement from the New School (April 13, 1967)
Box 21 Folder 2 1962
Correspondence with Doctor Henry David, President of the New School for Social Research, regarding plans for a dinner in honor of Kallen's 80th birthday (August 11, 1962).
Box 21 Folder 3 1972-1974
Copies of Konvitz's remark about Kallen, and book reviews by Konvitz on works by Kallen. Articles by Kallen and newspaper clippings about him. A list of the pictures of people on the walls of Kallen's study.
Box 21 Folder 4 1975
Articles on cultural pluralism. An article about Kallen and a typed paper on Kallen by Konvitz. An article in Hebrew.
Box 21 Folder 5 1964
Copy of a transcript of an interview of Kallen on August 31, 1964 by Konvitz and Dorothy Oko.
Box 21 Folder 6 1948-1974
1974 [1948], 1949, 1952, 1955. Correspondence between Konvitz and Cornell University Press and other publishers regarding routine publication matters concerning Horace Kallen's books, Ideals and Experience and The Liberal Spirit. Copy of the Memorandum of Agreement establishing the Board of Trustees for the Kallen Publication Revolving Fund.
Box 21 Folder 7 1948-1965
1948-1961, 1963-1965. Correspondence between Konvitz and Cornell University Press regarding the Kallen Revolving Fund annual report and the sale of Horace Kallen's books, Ideals and Experience and The Liberal Spirit. Also correspondence between Professor Konvitz and Kallen regarding the fund and proposals for a Near Eastern Center at the New School for Social Research. Konvitz supports the proposal for the establishment of a Near Eastern Center at the New School that would be committed to the Near East generally but perhaps with a primary interest in Israel (July 29, 1950). Kallen comments on the importance of education dealing with the problem of war as a perennial condition of existence and of training to meet that condition (July 24, 1950).
Box 21 Folder 8 1947-1952
[1947-1948] 1950, 1952. Routine material and correspondence with various publishers regarding the preparation and publication of Freedom and Experience: Essays Presented to Horace M. Kallen, edited by Sidney Hook and Konvitz.
Box 21 Folder 9 1945-1952
1945-[1947], 1952. Correspondence with various contributors to Freedom and Experience and others regarding the preparation and essays for the festschrift. Also correspondence with various people regarding contributions to the Kallen chair and Kallen's 65th birthday celebration fund.
Box 21 Folder 10 1947
Routine correspondence with contributing authors to Freedom and Experience regarding the book's preparation. Correspondence with various people regarding contributions to Kallen's 65th birthday celebration fund.
Box 21 Folder 11 1946-1947
1946-[1947]. Routine correspondence with contributing authors to Freedom and Experience regarding the book's preparation. Correspondence with various people regarding contributions to Kallen's 65th birthday celebration fund. Copy of a letter from Horace Kallen to Earle F. Waldridge, Reference Assistant at New York University Square Library, in which Kallen lists his publications (May 22, 1946).
Box 21 Folder 12 1967-1975
1967-[1968-1974]-1975. Correspondence with various people regarding annual solicitation among friends of Professor Horace M. Kallen for contributions to the Horace Kallen Salary Fund. Since Kallen's retirement in 1951, Konvitz annually solicited contributions from approximately 22 of Kallen's friends for funds to supplement Kallen's reduced income. Konvitz raised annually enough funds so that Kallen could continue to teach and to receive an income that was at least equal to the one he had earned prior to his retirement. Konvitz continued to raise funds for Kallen's salary through 1974, and he made certain that Kallen's wife, Rachel, would continue to receive an annual income of about half of the amount that Kallen and she had received before his death. To the best of Konvitz's knowledge, the Kallens were never made aware of his campaign to supplement their income. Correspondence regarding the Horace M. Kallen Chair at the New School for Social Research. Correspondence between Konvitz and Kallen regarding Kallen's Memorandum about "Proposed Staff Categories and Salaries" for the Jewish Teachers Seminary. Konvitz responds in detail to Kallen's proposal (May 3, 1971). Kallen's Memorandum is included (April 28, 1971). Related materials.
Box 21 Folder 13 1951-1965
Correspondence with contributors to the Horace Kallen Salary Fund and related materials. Correspondence between Konvitz and Donald C. Ottis regarding Ottis' plan for writing an anthology of Kallen's selected writings. Doctor Konvitz suggests that Ottis limit the anthology to Kallen's thoughts on cultural pluralism because he believes that in perspective of intellectual history Kallen's contribution to this subject will be judged to have been his most important contribution (May 3, 1962).
Box 21 Folder 14 1947-1986
Attorney and Legal Counsel to Senator Hubert Humphrey. Correspondence on the discussion of Professor Konvitz being appointed to the Commission on Government Security; personal, literary, and routine correspondence
Box 21 Folder 15 1960
Box 21 Folder 16 1947
Box 21 Folder 17 1949-1953
Mordecai Kaplan, Chairman of the Jewish Reconstruction Foundation, Incorporated. Correspondence regarding the Reconstructionist. Konvitz served on its Editorial Board
Box 21 Folder 18 1957-1980
Correspondence relating to a publication about Doctor Konvitz's grandfather; need for a study of underlying principles of Jewish law; Konvitz's appointment to the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton during his sabbatical from Cornell University; literary matters, speaking engagements, substantial amount of personal and routine correspondence.
Box 21 Folder 19 1957-1980
Correspondence relating to a publication about Doctor Konvitz's grandfather; need for a study of underlying principles of Jewish law; Konvitz's appointment to the Institute of Advanced Studies at Princeton during his sabbatical from Cornell University; literary matters, speaking engagements, substantial amount of personal and routine correspondence.
Box 21 Folder 20 1946-1953
Box 21 Folder 21 1946-1980
Correspondence regarding Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Rutgers University; includes reports and speeches of Katsh during his presidency; Konvitz delivered Commencement Address at Dropsie and received honorary degree; very substantial amount of personal correspondence.
Box 21 Folder 22 1946-1980
Correspondence regarding Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Rutgers University; includes reports and speeches of Katsh during his presidency; Konvitz delivered Commencement Address at Dropsie and received honorary degree; very substantial amount of personal correspondence.
Box 21 Folder 23 1946-1980
Correspondence regarding Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Rutgers University; includes reports and speeches of Katsh during his presidency; Konvitz delivered Commencement Address at Dropsie and received honorary degree; very substantial amount of personal correspondence.
Box 21 Folder 24 1947-1956
Box 21 Folder 25 1946-1980
Personal correspondence primarily with Else and son after death of Felix
Box 21 Folder 26 1954-1980
Correspondence regarding the establishment of a memorial award by Doctor Konvitz and others to be awarded to student receiving highest scholastic rating in Konvitz's course. Development of American Ideals.
Box 21 Folder 27 1954-1980
Correspondence regarding the establishment of a memorial award by Doctor Konvitz and others to be awarded to student receiving highest scholastic rating in Konvitz's course. Development of American Ideals.
Box 21 Folder 28 1947- 1958
Box 21 Folder 29 1965
Box 21 Folder 30
Box 21 Folder 31 1947-1964
Box 21 Folder 32 1950
Box 21 Folder 33 1949-1969
Box 21 Folder 34 1946-1950
Konvitz was a contributing editor for Reconstructionist
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Box 22 Folder 76
Box 22 Folder 77 1969-1976
Includes correspondence regarding the following: appointment as Associate in the University Seminar on Israel and Jewish Studies at Columbia University, 1969-1976; Scholar-In-Residence, Temple Israel, 1972-1973; Professor Emeritus, New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations, 1973; Morris J. Kaplun International Prize, 1969; Fellow of the National Endowment for the Humanities, 1975-1976; Doctor of Humane Letters, Yeshiva University, 1972; Honorary Degree of Doctor of Laws from the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, 1972.
Box 22 Folder 78 1978-1980
Correspondence and working papers regarding a bibliography which was in the process of being prepared.
Box 22 Folder 79
Includes articles, news releases, etcetera written about Konvitz
Box 23 Folder 1
Includes correspondence, completed faculty information form, releases, articles, completed fellowship application form, bibliography, and photographs.
Box 23 Folder 2
Box 23 Folder 3 1963
Correspondence, program, notes on the Law Institute on Religious Freedom and Public Affairs; includes letter to Francis B. Burch from Konvitz relative to Burch's disagreement with a few remarks made by Professor Konvitz at the conference; Konvitz discusses the remarks which Burch found offensive
Box 23 Folder 4 1953-1974
Box 23 Folder 5 1971-1974
Includes proposal, correspondence, minutes in relation to the preparation and publication of the International Encyclopedia of Labor of which Konvitz was a participant from the United States
Box 23 Folder 6 1964-1980
Correspondence regarding New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations business; letters of congratulation; arrangements for speaking engagements; July 30, 1974 letter from President Corson upon Konvitz's retirement, "Cornell is a better place for your having been here;" several letters of congratulation on Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Dropsie University.
Box 23 Folder 7 1964-1980
Correspondence regarding New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations business; letters of congratulation; arrangements for speaking engagements; July 30, 1974 letter from President Corson upon Konvitz's retirement, "Cornell is a better place for your having been here;" several letters of congratulation on Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Dropsie University.
Box 23 Folder 8 1964-1980
Correspondence regarding New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations business; letters of congratulation; arrangements for speaking engagements; July 30, 1974 letter from President Corson upon Konvitz's retirement, "Cornell is a better place for your having been here;" several letters of congratulation on Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Dropsie University.
Box 23 Folder 9 1964-1980
Correspondence regarding New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations business; letters of congratulation; arrangements for speaking engagements; July 30, 1974 letter from President Corson upon Konvitz's retirement, "Cornell is a better place for your having been here;" several letters of congratulation on Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Dropsie University.
Box 23 Folder 10 1964-1980
Correspondence regarding New York State School of Industrial and Labor Relations business; letters of congratulation; arrangements for speaking engagements; July 30, 1974 letter from President Corson upon Konvitz's retirement, "Cornell is a better place for your having been here;" several letters of congratulation on Konvitz receiving honorary Doctor of Letters degree from Dropsie University.
Box 23 Folder 11 1969-1970
Visiting Professor at the Truman Center for Advancement, Hebrew University. Correspondence with Konvitz's secretary in Ithaca and routine correspondence.
Box 23 Folder 12 1967-1968
Visiting Professor at Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Much correspondence with Professor Konvitz's secretary in Ithaca as well as the Dean of Hebrew University regarding preparation for Konvitz's visit to deliver the Paley Lectures in American Civilization at Hebrew University.
Box 23 Folder 13 1969-1983
Box 23 Folder 14 1969-1983
Box 23 Folder 15 1969-1983
Box 23 Folder 16 1969-1983
Box 23 Folder 17 1955-1973
Correspondence regarding editorials about Liberia, Cornell United Religious Works, and letter to editor urging New Yorkers to vote for Jack B. Weinstein as Chief Judge of the Court of Appeals
Box 23 Folder 18 1969
Letters of congratulations to Konvitz on his being the recipient of the Morris J. Kaplun International Prize for distinguished research and scholarship established at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem; newspaper clipping; program; Konvitz's speech during the presentation.
Box 23 Folder 19
Box 23 Folder 20 1974
December 1974
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Box 23 Folder 82
Box 24 Folder 1
Box 24 Folder 2 1948-1953
Box 24 Folder 3 1949
Includes 5 page letter by Konvitz regarding his views on Hiss Trial, Judge Kaufman, and the lawyers involved.
Box 24 Folder 4 1947-1959
Correspondence from Val Lorwin and letter from Konvitz to Attorney Herbert Brownell, Junior, regarding the Lorwin Case (1954) plus routine and personal correspondence.
Box 24 Folder 5 1960-1989
Literary, routine, and personal correspondence including letter of September 12, 1989 by Corliss Lamont on John Dewey.
Box 24 Folder 6 1951
Konvitz was a member of advisory panel; routine correspondence
Box 24 Folder 7 1975-1976
Includes draft copy by Lall, "Organized Labor's Community Work," 46 pages; also "Impact of National Health Insurance on Union Health Plans," 55 pages; "Union Health Centers of New York City," 32 pages; and unrelated memorandums
Box 24 Folder 8 1947-1956
Box 24 Folder 9 1949-1955
Correspondence regarding Konvitz's contributions to the publication
Box 24 Folder 10 1964-1966
Box 24 Folder 11 1969-1976
Konvitz was faculty advisor to Council; includes program, by-laws, publication, correspondence, etcetera
Box 24 Folder 12 1950-1980
Box 24 Folder 13 1947-1954
Box 24 Folder 14 1967
File on dismissal of Leon from Cortland State College
Box 24 Folder 15 1948-1951
Box 24 Folder 16 1958-1963
Box 24 Folder 17 1947-1968
Box 24 Folder 18 1944-1953
Letter from doctor Konvitz (December 1950) giving his views on separation of church and state and routine literary correspondence
Box 24 Folder 19 1949-1963
Box 24 Folder 20 1947-1961
Box 24 Folder 21 1949
Box 24 Folder 22 1949-1975
Box 24 Folder 23 1947-1980
Box 24 Folder 24 1950-1959
Mrs. Lewis was Professor Konvitz's former secretary, Mr. Lewis, former student.
Box 24 Folder 25 1964-1980
Correspondence with Sol M. Linowitz regarding problems of obtaining competent teachers for a constitutional justice course which Linowitz suggested in an editorial in the Times and routine; with Val Lorwin regarding Konvitz's feelings about "the world and our country" (February 8, 1968) and personal; and other personal and routine.
Box 24 Folder 26 1965-1975
Correspondence with officials of Firestone Plantations Company on an Industrial Relations Conference in Liberia on the labor situation in Liberia, and on various aspects of the Labor Code (Company has office in Liberia)
Box 24 Folder 27 1968-1975
Project financial statements from finance and business office, Cornell University
Box 24 Folder 28 1969-1973
Correspondence with Koss, project staff in New York City, regarding various drafts of code: proof reading, correcting, etcetera
Box 24 Folder 29 1962-1966
Box 24 Folder 30 1962- 1967
Box 24 Folder 31 1971-1974
Correspondence regarding the Project; and personal, 8 page "Tribute to Late President Tubman (Liberia) by Chief Justice Pierre"; also "Address delivered by His Honor James A.A. Pierre, Chief Justice of Liberia on the occasion of the First Judicial Conference of Liberia," in which he discusses Professor Konvitz's project; financial problems regarding the project
Box 25 Folder 1 1975-1977
Box 25 Folder 2 1971-1974
Box 25 Folder 3 1963-1980
Box 25 Folder 4 1963-1980
Box 25 Folder 5 1963-1980
Box 25 Folder 6 1966-1976
Box 25 Folder 7 1947-1949
Box 25 Folder 8 1959-1961
Box 25 Folder 9 1958-1966
Box 25 Folder 10 1958-1966
Box 25 Folder 11 1965-1977
Box 25 Folder 12 1947-1959
Substantial correspondence between Konvitz and J.B. Matthews (New York City) (1953) on the alleged involvement of Professor Horace Kallen with Communist organizations. Also literary and personal correspondence.
Box 25 Folder 13 1960-1980
Substantial amount of correspondence with Representative Matthew F. McHugh relative to his thoughts on Israel situation, his election, and legislation
Box 25 Folder 14 1960-1980
Substantial amount of correspondence with Representative Matthew F. McHugh relative to his thoughts on Israel situation, his election, and legislation
Box 25 Folder 15 1975-1976
Box 25 Folder 16 1948-1978
Personal correspondence regarding Horace Kallen and plans honoring Kallen's retirement; plans for Kallen's birthday parties; editing of Kallen's book by Marrow; appeals for special H. Kallen Fund at the New School and other personal
Box 25 Folder 17 1961-1967
Letters of congratulation from Doctor Konvitz; three page letter from Konvitz refreshing Thurgood's recollection about Konvitz's Liberian Codification Project before he leaves to make a speech at the inauguration of President Tubman in Liberia
Box 25 Folder 18 1946-1976
Literary, legal, and personal correspondence; copies of 1949 and 1950 minutes of the american Jewish Congress Commission on Law and Social Action; January 26, 1948 letter asking Konvitz if he knows whether the War Department has been pushing Nazi scientists into American Universities, including Cornell University, and Doctor Konvitz's reply.
Box 25 Folder 19 1968-1969
Copies of memorandums on McPhelin and tenure; six page memorandum to the Committee on Academic Freedom and Tenure from Professor Richard I. Hofferbert on the present state of academic freedom at Cornell.
Box 25 Folder 20 1976-1980
Konvitz, Chairman, Committee on Scholarships and Fellowships. Includes correspondence, reports of the Committee, scattered minutes of Planning Committee.
Box 25 Folder 21 1976-1980
Konvitz, Chairman, Committee on Scholarships and Fellowships. Includes correspondence, reports of the Committee, scattered minutes of Planning Committee.
Box 25 Folder 22 1966-1980
Box 25 Folder 23 1946-1953
Box 25 Folder 24 1948-1952
Box 26 Folder 1 1957-1981
Professor Konvitz served on the editorial board. Includes correspondence on formation of a Midstream faculty group at Cornell; internal problems; minutes of the editorial board; eight page "Tribute to Emanuel Neumann on Publication of His Autobiography" by Konvitz; comments and observations of Midstream articles by Konvitz; considerable amount of general correspondence relative to the internal operations of the editorial board: decisions on articles for publication, book reviews, etcetera.
Box 26 Folder 2 1957-1981
Professor Konvitz served on the editorial board. Includes correspondence on formation of a Midstream faculty group at Cornell; internal problems; minutes of the editorial board; eight page "Tribute to Emanuel Neumann on Publication of His Autobiography" by Konvitz; comments and observations of Midstream articles by Konvitz; considerable amount of general correspondence relative to the internal operations of the editorial board: decisions on articles for publication, book reviews, etcetera.
Box 26 Folder 3 1957-1981
Professor Konvitz served on the editorial board. Includes correspondence on formation of a Midstream faculty group at Cornell; internal problems; minutes of the editorial board; eight page "Tribute to Emanuel Neumann on Publication of His Autobiography" by Konvitz; comments and observations of Midstream articles by Konvitz; considerable amount of general correspondence relative to the internal operations of the editorial board: decisions on articles for publication, book reviews, etcetera.
Box 26 Folder 4 1946- 1966
Box 26 Folder 5 1947-1948
Box 26 Folder 6 1947-1956
Most of the materials are in Yiddish
Box 26 Folder 7 1963-1966
Box 26 Folder 8 1949-1954
Box 26 Folder 9 1961-1962
Box 26 Folder 10 1946-1948
Box 26 Folder 11 1948-1974
Box 26 Folder 12 1946- 1955
Letter thanking Professor Konvitz for a copy of his book (1946); December 27, 1946 letter regarding amnesty for conscientious objectors in prisons including Jehovah's Witnesses; letter to Doctor Albert Einstein, September 15, 1947, from Muste regarding atomic war threat; regarding militarization in the United States; also requests for various financial contributions.
Box 26 Folder 13 1955-1956
Box 26 Folder 14 1946-1980
With Professor Ernest Nagel, Columbia University concerning New Leader article by Konvitz regarding Communism and other routine (1946-1954); Herbert R. Northrup relative to a critical review of Northrup's book by an Industrial and Labor Relations professor and routine literary (1946-1953); fifteen page address by Vernon E. Jordan, Junior, President, National Urban League, Incorporated, given at annual meeting, National Conference of Catholic Charities, 1979; and other personal and literary items.
Box 26 Folder 15 1946-1980
With Professor Ernest Nagel, Columbia University concerning New Leader article by Konvitz regarding Communism and other routine (1946-1954); Herbert R. Northrup relative to a critical review of Northrup's book by an Industrial and Labor Relations professor and routine literary (1946-1953); fifteen page address by Vernon E. Jordan, Junior, President, National Urban League, Incorporated, given at annual meeting, National Conference of Catholic Charities, 1979; and other personal and literary items.
Box 26 Folder 16 1944-1955
Box 26 Folder 17 1947-1979
Konvitz was a member of the Legal Committee. Correspondence with Walter White, Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of colored People, and other officials regarding the establishment of an International Court of Human rights; relative to George Schuyler who, it was alleged, deliberately falsified facts regarding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; with Thurgood Marshall, Special Counsel, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People regarding the South Carolina Democratic Party (1948) excluding blacks; discrimination in the National Guard, dining cars; with W.E.B. DuBois, Director, Department of Special Research with relation to the legal status of the Negroes; report to the United Nations on the rights of American Negroes; with Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary relative to his speaking engagement at Cornell University and other routine issues; with Jack Greenberg, Director Counsel, Legal Defense and Education Fund, Incorporated, regarding sit-in cases before the Supreme Court as well as other cases.
Box 26 Folder 18 1947-1979
Konvitz was a member of the Legal Committee. Correspondence with Walter White, Secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of colored People, and other officials regarding the establishment of an International Court of Human rights; relative to George Schuyler who, it was alleged, deliberately falsified facts regarding the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; with Thurgood Marshall, Special Counsel, National Association for the Advancement of Colored People regarding the South Carolina Democratic Party (1948) excluding blacks; discrimination in the National Guard, dining cars; with W.E.B. DuBois, Director, Department of Special Research with relation to the legal status of the Negroes; report to the United Nations on the rights of American Negroes; with Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary relative to his speaking engagement at Cornell University and other routine issues; with Jack Greenberg, Director Counsel, Legal Defense and Education Fund, Incorporated, regarding sit-in cases before the Supreme Court as well as other cases.
Box 26 Folder 19 1949-1953
Box 26 Folder 20 1948-1949
Box 26 Folder 21 1949-1979
Box 26 Folder 22 1949-1979
Box 26 Folder 23 1946-1978
Box 26 Folder 24 1946-1978
Box 26 Folder 25 1977-1980
Box 26 Folder 26 1977-1980
Box 26 Folder 27 1951-1953
Box 26 Folder 28 1976-1980
Box 26 Folder 29 1946-1959
Box 26 Folder 30 1949- 1979
Box 27 Folder 1 1956-1960
Includes reports by Konvitz and others relative to the compliance operations of the agency with suggestions and recommendations for improvement; publications and correspondence regarding the report.
Box 27 Folder 2 1958-1966
Box 27 Folder 3 1959-1977
Box 27 Folder 4 1962-1963
Box 27 Folder 5 1955-1960
Box 27 Folder 6 1946-1965
Topics covered include Palestine, the United Nations, an anti-lynching bill, American-Israel relations, exploiting Arab refugees, birth control, and civil rights.
Box 27 Folder 7 1956-1957
Correspondence relative to Doctor Konvitz's letters to the editor on Arab refugees and other subjects
Box 27 Folder 8 1964-1969
Clippings, program, correspondence about the Alumni Achievement award presented to Konvitz by Washington Square College Alumni Association of New York University (1964)
Box 27 Folder 9 1978
Konvitz was a participant in the Symposium, "From Religious Toleration to Religious Freedom." Includes correspondence and 20 page speech given by Konvitz.
Box 27 Folder 10 1969
Box 27 Folder 11 1957-1958
Letter inviting Doctor Konvitz to Conference of Presidential Committee on Government Contracts; and other expressing his appreciation for attending Minority Community Resources Conference.
Box 27 Folder 12 1946-1948
Box 27 Folder 13 1947-1980
Correspondence between Konvitz and Victor A. Olander, Secretary-Treasurer, Illinois State Federation of Labor (1947) on the civil rights of labor; with Donald Otis relative to the editing and publication of the Horace Kallen anthology; a letter to John M. Olin from Professor Konvitz (1961) thanking Olin for the funding for the John M. Olin Library and Olin's reply.
Box 27 Folder 14 1947-1980
Correspondence between Konvitz and Victor A. Olander, Secretary-Treasurer, Illinois State Federation of Labor (1947) on the civil rights of labor; with Donald Otis relative to the editing and publication of the Horace Kallen anthology; a letter to John M. Olin from Professor Konvitz (1961) thanking Olin for the funding for the John M. Olin Library and Olin's reply.
Box 27 Folder 15 1947-1971
Box 27 Folder 16 1956-1979
Box 27 Folder 17 1953-1965
Box 27 Folder 18 1953-1965
Box 27 Folder 19
no date
Box 27 Folder 20 1948-1981
Box 27 Folder 21 1948-1981
Box 27 Folder 22 1964
Box 27 Folder 23 1948-1980
Box 27 Folder 24 1969- 1979
Box 27 Folder 25 1963
Box 27 Folder 26 1966
Box 27 Folder 27 1949-1951
Box 27 Folder 28 1948-1951
Includes correspondence relative to the publication of Alex Pekelis's writings in which Konvitz was very much involved; book reviews, and photographs.
Box 27 Folder 29 1967-1979
Box 27 Folder 30 1955-1975
Includes some discussion of the Monthly Labor Review; plans for Selig Perlman's retirement and an issue of ILR Review (Industrial and Labor Relations Review) dedicated to Perlman
Box 27 Folder 31 1950-1958
Box 27 Folder 32 1975-1979
Box 27 Folder 33 1947-1976
Box 27 Folder 34 1949-1951
Box 27 Folder 35 1965-1966
Box 27 Folder 36 1962-1966
Box 27 Folder 37 1961
Box 28 Folder 1 1961
Box 28 Folder 2 1949
Box 28 Folder 3 1951-1956
Box 28 Folder 4
Correspondence relative to plans for Horace Kallen's eighty-fifth birthday celebration; includes articles by Pilch and personal correspondence between Konvitz and Pilch as well as literary correspondence. No date.
Box 28 Folder 5
Correspondence relative to plans for Horace Kallen's eighty-fifth birthday celebration; includes articles by Pilch and personal correspondence between Konvitz and Pilch as well as literary correspondence. No date.
Box 28 Folder 6
Correspondence relative to plans for Horace Kallen's eighty-fifth birthday celebration; includes articles by Pilch and personal correspondence between Konvitz and Pilch as well as literary correspondence. No date.
Box 28 Folder 7 1948-1958
Box 28 Folder 8 1947-1949
Box 28 Folder 9 1955-1974
Plans for Konvitz's sabbatical to be spent in Israel and other trips abroad; routine and personal. 9a. Prizes - Routine correspondence (1963)
Box 28 Folder 10 1968-1969
Includes mailings sent out by New York State Professors for Humphrey-Muskie clippings, invitation to Doctor Konvitz for dinner in honor of Vice-President Humphrey, letter from Humphrey (November 27, 1968) thanking Konvitz for his support during the campaign.
Box 28 Folder 11 1949-1950
Box 28 Folder 12 1963-1966
Box 28 Folder 13 1963-1966
Box 28 Folder 14 1969-1974
Box 28 Folder 15 1947-1980
Box 28 Folder 16 1947-1980
Box 28 Folder 17 1947-1980
Box 28 Folder 18 1947-1980
Box 28 Folder 19 1953-1974
Box 28 Folder 20 1970-1979
Box 28 Folder 21 1956-1965
Box 28 Folder 22 1966-1975
Box 28 Folder 23 1967-1989
Box 28 Folder 24 1975-1979
Box 29 Folder 1 1946-1955
Box 29 Folder 2 1969-1979
Box 29 Folder 3 1960
Box 29 Folder 4 1947-1955
Box 29 Folder 5 1962-1974
Box 29 Folder 6 1972-1978
Box 29 Folder 7 1976-1978
Box 29 Folder 8 1947-1980
Box 29 Folder 9 1947-1980
Box 29 Folder 10 1962-1975
Box 29 Folder 11 1948-1954
Letter to the editor, New York Times, by Rosenwald. Konvitz questions some points made regarding American-Jewish loyalty. Palestine issue; discusses the Israeli constitution; relative to the Chicago conference - Doctor Konvitz states his opinion of the conference in a six-page letter to Rosenwald giving frank impressions of the conference and routine and personal.
Box 29 Folder 12 1959-1980
Box 29 Folder 13 1959-1980
13a. Rosenzweig, Margaret (Director of Research, Liberian Project) and Simon. Correspondence regarding Liberian Project and events in Liberia; literary correspondence regarding setting up the Robert Chasen Memorial Poetry prize at Cornell University
Box 29 Folder 14 1969-1976
Box 29 Folder 15 1947-1970
Box 29 Folder 16 1947-1977
Box 29 Folder 17 1954-1955
Box 29 Folder 18 1954
Box 29 Folder 19 1951-1963
Box 29 Folder 20 1946-1959
Box 29 Folder 21 1944-1959
From Curtis Swabey, former teacher of Konvitz's, New York University; with Simon Sobeloff, United States Solicitor General, regarding information on various cases and personal correspondence; generally routine correspondence
Box 29 Folder 22 1950-1963
With Abram L. Sachar, President of Brandeis University, regarding personal and routine; with Arthur Schlesinger regarding literary and personal; with Rabbi Steven S. Schwarzchild, relative to a special issue of Judaism; and other routine and literary correspondence
Box 29 Folder 23 1955-1963
With Whitney Seymour, President, American Bar Association, relative to the exclusion of Negro lawyers from membership; with Jacob Sheinkman, Counsel, Amalgamated Clothing Workers, regarding civil rights legislation; and other routine, literary, and personal letters.
Box 29 Folder 24 1960-1964
Box 29 Folder 25 1962-1980
With Sarah Schmidt with regard to her dissertation on Horace Kallen; routine and personal correspondence
Box 29 Folder 26 1965-1980
With Jacob Sheinkman, Counsel of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers, and President of the Jewish Labor Committee, about the J.P. Stevens contract; and other personal and routine correspondence
Box 29 Folder 27 1964-1981
With Professor M.N. Srinivas, Institute for Social and Economic Change (India) - personal and literary correspondence. Other routine, personal, and literary correspondence.
Box 29 Folder 28 1951-1979
With Clyde W. Summers, University of Buffalo, regarding literary, teaching, and personal correspondence.
Box 30 Folder 1 1959-1960
Box 30 Folder 2 1946-1961
Box 30 Folder 3 1947-1955
Box 30 Folder 4 1961
Box 30 Folder 5 1960-1961
Box 30 Folder 6 1952-1967
Box 30 Folder 7 1946-1964
Box 30 Folder 8 1946-1964
Box 30 Folder 9 1945-1949
Box 30 Folder 10 1946
Box 30 Folder 11 1949
Box 30 Folder 12 1972
Box 30 Folder 13 1953-1979
Box 30 Folder 14 1953-1979
Box 30 Folder 15 1954-1975
Box 30 Folder 16 1947-1955
Box 30 Folder 17 1946-1960
Box 30 Folder 18 1954-1980
Box 30 Folder 19 1961-1971
Box 30 Folder 20 1948-1959
Box 30 Folder 21 1949-1953
Box 30 Folder 22 1950
Box 30 Folder 23 1947-1960
Box 30 Folder 24 1954-1955
Information on Professor Marcus Singer, Zoology Department, Cornell University, refusing to give the House Committee on Un-American Activities the names of other members of the Marxist Study Group while at Harvard. Correspondence on efforts to raise funds to assist Singer with his defense.
Box 30 Folder 25 1960-1961
Box 30 Folder 26 1971
Box 30 Folder 27 1973-1979
Box 30 Folder 28 1950-1979
ACCESS RESTRICTED
Box 30 Folder 29 1945-1954
Box 30 Folder 30 1945-1957
Box 30 Folder 31 1973
Correspondence, program, memorandums relative to the Freedom Assembly for Soviet Jews, June 17, 1973, held during a visit to the United States by Leonid I. Brezhnev. Konvitz served on organizing committee
Box 31 Folder 1 1954-1978
Box 31 Folder 2 1954-1978
Box 31 Folder 3 1954-1978
Box 31 Folder 4 1949-1950
Box 31 Folder 5 1968-1979
Box 31 Folder 6 1953-1962
Box 31 Folder 7 1953-1962
Box 31 Folder 8 1948-1950
Box 31 Folder 9 1949-1950
Box 31 Folder 10 1968-1979
Box 31 Folder 11 1968-1979
Box 31 Folder 12 1952-1967
Box 31 Folder 13 1960- 1962
Box 31 Folder 14 1966- 1973
Box 31 Folder 15 1966-1978
Box 31 Folder 16 1947-1979
Box 31 Folder 17 1947-1979
Box 31 Folder 18 1947-1979
Box 31 Folder 19 1967-1980
Box 31 Folder 20 1949
Box 31 Folder 21 1971-1972
Box 31 Folder 22 1947-1966
Box 31 Folder 23 1969-1980
Box 31 Folder 24 1955-1956
Box 31 Folder 25 1953-1955
Correspondence relative to Konvitz's appearance on Edward R. Murrow's program, November 12, 1953. Includes copies of the broadcast, correspondence relative to the arrangements and to its adaptation into a responsive reading for World Day of Prayer Service, and many letters complimenting Konvitz on the broadcast.
Box 31 Folder 26 1947-1973
Box 31 Folder 27 1947-1973
Box 31 Folder 28 1971-1980
Correspondence relative to the founding of the school in 1971 and Doctor Konvitz as a visiting lecturer; school bulletins; 11 page "Sketch of a Curriculum for a Law School at Touro College" (1972); and Konvitz's comments on the Law School and curriculum. Konvitz turns down offer to become first dean of the new law school.
Box 31 Folder 29 1948-1964
Box 31 Folder 30 1949-1982
Box 31 Folder 31 1949-1982
Box 31 Folder 32 1949-1982
Box 32 Folder 1 1961-1977
Box 32 Folder 2 1961-1977
Box 32 Folder 3 1966- 1979
Box 32 Folder 4 1967-1969
Box 32 Folder 5 1947-1950
Box 32 Folder 6 1968-1973
Box 32 Folder 7 1946-1977
Box 32 Folder 8 1946-1977
Box 32 Folder 9 1972- 1976
Box 32 Folder 10 1972- 1976
Box 32 Folder 11 1945-1956
Personal and literary correspondence; May 19, 1953 correspondence from Konvitz on the opinions of Chief Justice Warren in the school segregation cases.
Box 32 Folder 12 1954
Box 32 Folder 13 1946- 1964
Box 32 Folder 14 1946- 1964
Box 32 Folder 15 1946- 1964
Box 32 Folder 16 1947-1978
Personal Correspondence with Professor Edwin Witte regarding routine matters; correspondence with R.H. Wendell, Chicago and Western Indiana railroad Company (Manager, Employee Relations) on the employment of Negroes in his company; other literary and personal letters.
Box 32 Folder 17 1947-1978
Personal Correspondence with Professor Edwin Witte regarding routine matters; correspondence with R.H. Wendell, Chicago and Western Indiana railroad Company (Manager, Employee Relations) on the employment of Negroes in his company; other literary and personal letters.
Box 32 Folder 18 1947-1978
Personal Correspondence with Professor Edwin Witte regarding routine matters; correspondence with R.H. Wendell, Chicago and Western Indiana railroad Company (Manager, Employee Relations) on the employment of Negroes in his company; other literary and personal letters.
Box 32 Folder 19 1947-1978
Personal Correspondence with Professor Edwin Witte regarding routine matters; correspondence with R.H. Wendell, Chicago and Western Indiana railroad Company (Manager, Employee Relations) on the employment of Negroes in his company; other literary and personal letters.
Box 32 Folder 20 1951-1953
Box 32 Folder 21 1949-1957
Box 32 Folder 22 1949-1951
Box 32 Folder 23 1963- 1965
Box 33 Folder 1 1948-1960
Box 33 Folder 2 1948-1960
Box 33 Folder 3 1948-1960
Box 33 Folder 4 1947
Box 33 Folder 5 1948-1950
Box 33 Folder 6 1947-1951
Box 33 Folder 7 1952-1957
Box 33 Folder 8 1947-1957
Box 33 Folder 9 1947- 1952
Box 33 Folder 10 1961-1962
Box 33 Folder 11 1947-1948
Box 33 Folder 12 1947-1950
Box 33 Folder 13 1949-1976
Box 33 Folder 14 1969-1980
Box 33 Folder 15 1969-1980
Box 33 Folder 16 1969-1980
Box 33 Folder 17 1947-1985
17a. Wyzanski, Charles E. Junior (Judge). Letter to Konvitz congratulating him on an excellent letter in the New York Times describing Abraham Epstein and I.M. Rubinow. Discusses the drafting of the Social Security Act. 1985
Box 33 Folder 18 1962-1980
Box 33 Folder 19 1962-1980
Box 33 Folder 20 1948-1980
Box 33 Folder 21 1948-1980
Box 33 Folder 22 1949-1989
Correspondence regarding Konvitz receiving Mordecai ben David Award at the Thirty-Fourth Commencement (1965) and Doctor of Human Letters in 1972. Letter (1976) from President Norman Lamm commenting on Konvitz being offered the Deanship of Cardozo Law School and regretting his refusal to take the position; other routine and personal correspondence.
Box 33 Folder 23 1953-1980
Box 33 Folder 24 1953-1980
Box 33 Folder 25 1954-1959
Box 33 Folder 26 1971-1977
Box 33 Folder 27 1973-1980
Box 33 Folder 28 1946-1967
Box 33 Folder 29 1949-1958
Box 33 Folder 30 1961-1965
Box 33 Folder 31 1960-1969
1960's
This series consists of Professor Knoviltz's voluminous reference files arranged alphabetically by subject and thereunder in rough chronological order. The files consist largely of newspaper and periodical clippings, newsletters, and legal documents (which are not described individually). Correspndence which Professor Konvitz chsse to file under subject rather than by the name of the author, as well as minutes, speeches, draft manuscripts, transcrits, pre-1940 pamphlets, and other significant primary source documents, are noted individually in the listing below.
Box 34 Folder 1
Box 34 Folder 2
Box 34 Folder 3
Box 34 Folder 4
Box 34 Folder 5
Box 34 Folder 6
Box 34 Folder 7
Box 34 Folder 8
Box 34 Folder 9
Box 34 Folder 10
Box 34 Folder 11
Box 34 Folder 12
Box 34 Folder 13
Box 34 Folder 14
Box 34 Folder 15
Box 34 Folder 16
Box 34 Folder 17
Box 34 Folder 18
Box 34 Folder 19
Box 34 Folder 20
Box 34 Folder 21
Box 34 Folder 22
Box 34 Folder 23
Box 34 Folder 24
Box 34 Folder 25
Box 35 Folder 1
Box 35 Folder 2
Box 35 Folder 3
Box 35 Folder 4
Box 35 Folder 5
Box 35 Folder 6
Box 35 Folder 7
Box 35 Folder 8
Box 35 Folder 9
Box 35 Folder 10
Box 35 Folder 11
Box 35 Folder 12
Box 35 Folder 13
Box 35 Folder 14
Box 35 Folder 15
Box 35 Folder 16
Box 35 Folder 17
Box 35 Folder 18
Box 35 Folder 19
Box 35 Folder 20
Box 35 Folder 21
Box 35 Folder 22
Box 35 Folder 23
Box 35 Folder 24
Box 35 Folder 25
Box 35 Folder 26
Box 36 Folder 1
Box 36 Folder 2
Box 36 Folder 3
Box 36 Folder 4
Box 36 Folder 5
Box 36 Folder 6
Box 36 Folder 7
Box 36 Folder 8
Box 36 Folder 9
Box 36 Folder 10
Box 36 Folder 11
Box 36 Folder 12
Box 36 Folder 13
Box 36 Folder 14
Box 36 Folder 15
Box 36 Folder 16
Box 36 Folder 17
Box 36 Folder 18
Box 36 Folder 19
Box 36 Folder 20
Box 36 Folder 21
Box 36 Folder 22
Box 36 Folder 23
Box 36 Folder 24
Box 37 Folder 1
Box 37 Folder 2
Box 37 Folder 3
Box 37 Folder 4
Box 37 Folder 5
Box 37 Folder 6
Box 37 Folder 7
Box 37 Folder 8
Box 37 Folder 9
Box 37 Folder 10
Box 37 Folder 11
Box 37 Folder 12
Box 37 Folder 13
Box 37 Folder 14
Box 37 Folder 15
Box 37 Folder 16
Box 37 Folder 17
Box 38 Folder 1
Box 38 Folder 2
Box 38 Folder 3
Box 38 Folder 4
Box 38 Folder 5
Box 38 Folder 6
Box 38 Folder 7
Box 38 Folder 8
Box 38 Folder 9
Box 38 Folder 10
Box 38 Folder 11
Box 38 Folder 12
Box 38 Folder 13
Box 38 Folder 14
Box 38 Folder 15
Box 38 Folder 16
Box 38 Folder 17
Box 38 Folder 18
Box 38 Folder 19
Box 38 Folder 20
Box 38 Folder 21
Box 38 Folder 22
Box 38 Folder 23
Box 38 Folder 24
Box 38 Folder 25
Box 38 Folder 26
Box 38 Folder 27
Box 38 Folder 28
Box 38 Folder 29
Box 39 Folder 1
Box 39 Folder 2
Box 39 Folder 3
Box 39 Folder 4
Box 39 Folder 5
Box 39 Folder 6
Box 39 Folder 7
Box 39 Folder 8
Box 39 Folder 9
Box 39 Folder 10
Box 39 Folder 11
Box 39 Folder 12
Box 39 Folder 13
Box 39 Folder 14
Box 39 Folder 15
Box 39 Folder 16
16a. Aliens
Box 39 Folder 17
Box 39 Folder 18
Box 39 Folder 19
Box 39 Folder 20
Box 39 Folder 21
Box 39 Folder 22
Box 39 Folder 23
Box 39 Folder 24
Box 40 Folder 1
Box 40 Folder 2
Box 40 Folder 3
Box 40 Folder 4 1980
Executive Committee, Governing Council, November 13, 1980 minutes; Executive Committee, Governing Council, June 23, 1980 minutes
Box 40 Folder 5
Box 40 Folder 6
Box 40 Folder 7
Box 40 Folder 8
Box 40 Folder 9
Box 40 Folder 10
Box 40 Folder 11
Box 40 Folder 12
Box 40 Folder 13 1964-1978
Minutes: Executive Committee, Academic Freedom Committee, Board of Directors, National Planning Committee (primarily 1976); memorandum to: Board from: Alan Reitman, regarding Proposal by George Slaff to rescind the 1939 Board expulsion of Elizabeth Gurley Flynn; memorandum to: Members of the National Advisory Council, from: Roger Baldwin, Arthur Schlessinger, Melvyn Douglas, and Luther H. Evans, regarding: Proposal to rescind the 1939 Board expulsion of Elizabeth Gurley Flynn; memorandum to: Board of Directors, from: Paul R. Meyer, regarding: Attempt to review 1940 action of prior Board on expulsion of Elizabeth Gurley Flynn
Box 40 Folder 14 1980-1985
Minutes: American Civil Liberties Union Foundation Board, June 20, 1980; Board of Directors, June 21-22, 1985; Executive Committee, June 20, 1980 and August 23, 1980
Box 41 Folder 1 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 2 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 3 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 4 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 5 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 6 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 7 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 8 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 9 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 10 1980-1983
Inter-office memoranda on the following subjects: annual Equal Employment Opportunities report; report of Special Committee on Arrest Records; Academic Freedom Committee report on Policy 64; American Civil Liberties Union policy statements on the following subjects: acceptance of government funds; medical experimentation on institutionalized human subjects; warrantless searches; grand jury policy; Communications Media Committee repot on libel, privacy, and the media; Women's Rights Project; public information and education activities; statement on police use of deadly force; privacy rights of employees of private employers; insanity in criminal cases; use of public property for religious purposes; American Civil Liberties Union use of unionized services; private pressure groups; policy statements on American support for specific programs of foreign countries which violate human rights; Reagan Administration budget cuts; internal union democracy; racial discrimination; and fair representation by refugee care; abortion and school prayer; privileged communication; the grand jury and institution of formal criminal proceedings; compulsory education; use of private property for religious purposes; mental illness, and American Civil Liberties Union policy on civil commitment. Also Affirmative Action Report and minutes of Executive Council Meetings.
Box 41 Folder 11 1980-1981
Minutes: 1980 General Counsel Meeting; 1981 General Counsel Meetings; 1981 Executive Committee Meeting.
Box 41 Folder 12 1980-1982
Excerpt from April 12-13, 1980 Board Minutes; Board of Directors minutes for meetings November-December 1981, October 10-11, 1981, and June 20-21, 1981; American Civil Liberties Union Foundation Board minutes for meetings June 19, 1981 and August 15, 1981; American Civil Liberties Union Foundation Board meeting minutes June 11, 1982 and October 8, 1982; Board of Directors meeting minutes October 9-10, 1982, June 12-13, 1982, April 3-4, 1982, and January 23-24, 1982.
Box 41 Folder 13
Box 41 Folder 14
Box 41 Folder 15
Box 41 Folder 16